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Donald J. Trump After the White House Page 3

The Trump Presidency is over, it started with lie and 30,000 lies later, it ended with lies, over 400,000 Americans dead many who would not have die if not for Trump’s lies. Trump's first lie was about the size of his inauguration claiming it was bigger than Obama it was not. Here are some but not all of his lies. He lied about contacts his campaign had with Russians. He lied about his attempt to force the Ukraine to help him dig up dirt on Biden so he could win the 2020 election. Trump’s lies about the coronavirus caused the deaths of 400,000 Americans maybe more. Trump attempted multiple coups, cause sedition, incited insurrection and the sacking of the capitol of the United States of America. Trump ended his presidency with a lie about the election claiming he won more votes than Biden did he did not. That lie lead to sedition, insurrection and the sacking of the capitol of the United States of America. This page is Tracking Donald J. Trump after his time in the White House.

Learn more about some of the legal issues of Donald J. Trump (aka Don the Con, aka Don the Snake, aka Two face Donnie, aka The Don, aka Criminal Don). Here you can find a short list of the lawsuits against Donald J. Trump.


On January 6, 2021, the United States Capitol was sacked in a riot and violent attack against the 117th United States Congress in an attempted coup d’état. With help from his allies, Fox News, right-wing media and some in the Republican Party; Donald J. Trump incited insurrection, sedition, attempted a coup d’etat and caused the sacking of the United States Capitol. Donald J. Trump’s coup attempt involved some House members, some Senate members, and Mike Pence overturning the election certification process with the hope that Trump could steal the election and steal the presidency. more...

By Jack Dutton

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) launched another scathing attack on former President Donald Trump, accusing him of dividing the United States into a "dark and dangerous place" by continuously claiming the November election results were fraudulent. In a statement entered into a congressional record that was released on Thursday, the Utah lawmaker said Trump's denial of the election results was "one of the most reprehensible acts" possible and warned that the perpetuation of this "big lie" threatens the American people. Romney was one of seven Republicans who joined all 50 Democrats in the upper chamber to vote for convicting Trump at his second impeachment trial. Although a majority was obtained, it fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict him. more...

Rachel Maddow reports on the distinguished background of attorney Mark Pomerantz, whose work as a mob lawyer helped define RICO prosecutions, and who has been made a special assistant district attorney by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, dedicated to the investigation of Donald Trump's business dealings. Aired on 02/19/2021. video...

The United States formally rejoins the Paris Agreement today, after former President Trump withdrew from the treaty. President Biden has called climate change the "number one issue facing humanity," CBS News climate and energy reporter Cara Korte joins "CBSN AM" to talk about the significance of the world's second-biggest carbon emitter rejoining the global effort to address the climate crisis. video...

By Jonathan Easley and Juliegrace Brufke

Allies of former President Trump say he’s determined to make life miserable for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). Trump’s political machine, which has $60 million in a super PAC and an unmatched grass-roots fundraising apparatus, is vowing to go aggressively after GOP lawmakers in primaries in the wake of an unprecedented feud between the nation’s two most powerful Republicans. Trump was prepared to give McConnell a pass, sources in his orbit stated, after he gave a blistering post-impeachment floor speech saying the former president was “practically and morally” responsible for the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol that led to five deaths and the evacuation of Congress. more...

By Alex Gangitano

The war between former President Trump and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is likely to turn into a battle over money as Republican donors will be forced to choose between Trump-backed and GOP-establishment candidates. The fundraising rift could prove detrimental to Republicans, who are seeking to flip both the House and Senate in the 2022 midterm elections. Trump blasted McConnell this week after the Senate GOP leader said Trump was responsible for the Jan. 6 riot. Trump vowed to back primary opponents who are more aligned with his base, setting up a battle over the future of the Republican party. Many Republican donors are avoiding taking sides publicly for now, but strategists see signs of things to come in 2022 and 2024. more...

By Daniella Diaz and Manu Raju, CNN

Washington (CNN) Rep. Steve Scalise, the No. 2 House Republican, privately met with former President Donald Trump in Florida earlier this week, the latest example of the splintering views among leading congressional Republicans on the role Trump plays in the party going forward. "He's in Florida this week on political travel and had meetings at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday and touched base with President Trump while he was there," Scalise's spokeswoman Lauren Fine told CNN. Politico first reported the meeting.
The visit comes at a time when the GOP is split over Trump's legacy in the party as it moves forward in the Biden era. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy also visited with Trump at Mar-a-Lago a few weeks ago and most House Republicans -- with the notable exception of GOP conference chair Liz Cheney -- view Trump as a force in the party. But Trump's support is less pronounced in the Senate, where GOP leader Mitch McConnell and John Thune, the No. 2 Senate Republican who faces reelection in South Dakota next year, have both worked to distance themselves from the former President in recent weeks. more...

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and the NAACP are using the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 in a lawsuit against former President Donald Trump and others.
By Char Adams

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and the NAACP are suing former President Donald Trump and his longtime ally Rudy Giuliani for allegedly conspiring with a pair of hate groups to storm the U.S. Capitol and block the Electoral College count in January. And they’re using a 150-year-old law as the basis of the suit. Thompson and the NAACP, the nation's oldest civil rights organization, allege in the suit, obtained by NBC News, that Trump, Giuliani, the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers used “intimidation, harassment, and threats,” to stop the vote count and caused the Jan. 6 Capitol riot in the process. This, they said, violated the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871. “I guess it tells you something when you can use a Ku Klux Klan law from the 1870s,” said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University. “It’s part of a series of laws enacted after the Civil War. Everything old is, unfortunately, new again." more...

Lucas Ropek

A ransomware gang claims to have stolen over 100 gigabytes of data from Jones Day, a prominent global law firm that recently stirred backlash for its entanglement in the 2020 presidential election. The hacker group CL0P has posted a large tranche of stolen files to a dark web “leak site,” claiming it snatched them from the law firm during a recent cyberattack. Such sites will typically be used by hackers to goad a victim into paying a ransom. CL0P’s site is publicly available we have independently verified its existence. Databreaches.net initially reported the breach yesterday. According to reporting from the Wall Street Journal, CL0P claims to have reached out to the law firm about the hack in an apparent bid to initiate ransom negotiations: more...

The civil rights group brought the suit on behalf of Representative Bennie Thompson of Mississippi, with other Democrats in Congress expected to join as plaintiffs.
By Annie Karni

WASHINGTON — The N.A.A.C.P. on Tuesday morning filed a federal lawsuit against former President Donald J. Trump and his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, claiming that they violated a 19th century statute when they tried to prevent the certification of the election on Jan. 6. The civil rights organization brought the suit on behalf of Representative Bennie Thompson, Democrat of Mississippi. Other Democrats in Congress — including Representatives Hank Johnson of Georgia and Bonnie Watson Coleman of New Jersey — are expected to join as plaintiffs in the coming weeks, according to the N.A.A.C.P.

The lawsuit contends that Mr. Trump and Mr. Giuliani violated the Ku Klux Klan Act, an 1871 statute that includes protections against violent conspiracies that interfered with Congress’s constitutional duties; the suit also names the Proud Boys, the far-right nationalist group, and the Oath Keepers militia group. The legal action accuses Mr. Trump, Mr. Giuliani and the two groups of conspiring to incite a violent riot at the Capitol, with the goal of preventing Congress from certifying the election. more...

By: Associated Press

The lawsuit from Mississippi’s Rep. Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, is part of an expected wave of litigation over the Jan. 6 riot and is believed to be the first filed by a member of Congress. It seeks unspecified punitive and compensatory damages. The case also names as defendants the Republican former president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and groups including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, extremist organizations that had members charged by the Justice Department with taking part in the siege.

Lawyers for Trump have denied that he incited the riot. A Trump adviser didn’t immediately comment about the lawsuit on Tuesday, and a lawyer for Giuliani did not immediately return an email seeking comment. The suit, filed in federal court in Washington under a Reconstruction-era law known as the Ku Klux Klan Act, comes three days after Trump was acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial that centered on allegations that he incited the riot, in which five people died. That acquittal is likely to open the door to fresh legal scrutiny over Trump’s actions before and during the siege. more...

By COLLEEN LONG

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s acquittal at his second impeachment trial may not be the final word on whether he’s to blame for the deadly Capitol riot. The next step for the former president could be the courts. Now a private citizen, Trump is stripped of his protection from legal liability that the presidency gave him. That change in status is something that even Republicans who voted on Saturday to acquit of inciting the Jan. 6 attack are stressing as they urge Americans to move on from impeachment. “President Trump is still liable for everything he did while he was in office, as an ordinary citizen, unless the statute of limitations has run,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said after that vote. He insisted that the courts were a more appropriate venue to hold Trump accountable than a Senate trial. “He didn’t get away with anything yet,” McConnell said. “Yet.” The insurrection at the Capitol, in which five people died, is just one of the legal cases shadowing Trump in the months after he was voted out of office. He also faces legal exposure in Georgia over an alleged pressure campaign on state election officials, and in Manhattan over hush-money payments and business deals. more...

Wall Street Journal says prosecutors interested in loans relating to four Manhattan properties
Police officers stand guard in front of Trump Tower in New York.
Edward Helmore

While there was good news for Donald Trump in Washington on Saturday, as his second impeachment trial ended in acquittal, troubling news came out of his native New York. The Wall Street Journal reported that prosecutors in the city are investigating about $280m in loans to the Trump Organization, related to four buildings in Manhattan: Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue; a skyscraper at 40 Wall St; a hotel and residential building on Columbus Circle near Central Park; and an apartment building on the Upper East Side. The investigations appear to be an extension of a previously acknowledged move by Manhattan’s Democratic district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr, over what prosecutors have called “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization”. Trump has described the New York investigation, triggered by an alleged $130,000 hush-money payment to the adult film star Stormy Daniels over an alleged sexual liaison, as “a continuation of the worst witch-hunt in American history”. more...

The word "traitor" was spray-painted on the front of the attorney's driveway.
By Bill Hutchinson

Vandals targeted the home of one of former President Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers, spray-painting the word "TRAITOR" in red on his driveway in suburban Philadelphia, police said. The vandalism occurred around 8 p.m. on Friday at attorney Michael van der Veen's residence in West Whiteland Township, Pennsylvania, about 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia, according to police. No arrests have been made, Detective Scott Pezick of the West Whiteland Township Police Department told ABC News on Sunday afternoon. Pezick said private security has since been hired by the homeowner to protect the residence, and police presence has been beefed up in van der Veen's neighborhood. more...

Our View: Of the 100 Senate jurors who heard Donald Trump’s impeachment case, over 15 senators were more co-conspirators than independent judges.
The Editorial Board | USA TODAY

The fact that the Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump of inciting insurrection is a stain on America’s most prestigious legislative body. The facts were plain. But more than a stain, the Senate has a sickness as well. Of the 100 jurors who heard Trump’s impeachment case, at least 16 were more co-conspirators in Trump’s efforts to overturn a free and fair election than they were independent judges. Eight voted last month to overturn Joe Biden’s election victory — the precise outcome the Trump-inspired insurrectionists sought when they left his rally and marched to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Republican Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Josh Hawley of Missouri, Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi, John Neely Kennedy of Louisiana, Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming, Roger Marshall of Kansas, Rick Scott of Florida and Tommy Tuberville of Alabama attempted to derail America’s centuries-old experiment in democracy. more...

Democrats won the impeachment witness fight when Trump’s team agreed to enter evidence of the call showing his dereliction of duty in the Capitol attack.
Norman Eisen and Katherine Reisner

Despite the shameful failure of 43 senators to honor their oaths, the outcome of the Senate impeachment trial offered hope for the cause of accountability for former President Donald Trump and others who backed the Big Lie that gave us the Jan. 6 insurrection: that the 2020 election was stolen. The denouement was by far the largest number of Republicans ever to cross party lines to convict a president of their own party in an impeachment trial. Seven did so, as opposed to the single such vote in Trump's prior impeachment.

When the trial resumed Saturday morning, it was expected that there would be no witnesses. Then a bipartisan 55-45 vote opened the door to the testimony from at least one person — Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Washington. She had information about a phone conversation in the middle of the insurrection in which Trump seemed to welcome the violent chaos — revealing his impeachable intent to incite the mob. Negotiations then led to a compromise: a “stipulation,” or agreement by both sides, that her statement about Trump’s bad intent would be admitted into the record. more...

Tim O'Donnell

These days, it can often feel like former President Donald Trump is off the grid, but he made himself known Saturday shortly after he was acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial for the second time in just over a year. In a statement, Trump thanked his legal team and the lawmakers who voted not guilty, while blasting Democrats, whom he accused of getting a "free pass to denigrate the rule of law." The impeachment effort, Trump claimed, was "another phase" of what he considers "the greatest witch hunt" in American history. more...

Senate minority leader says Trump ‘practically and morally responsible’ for Capitol riot, but votes not guilty regardless
Amanda Holpuch

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said on Saturday that Donald Trump was “practically and morally responsible” for the insurrection at the US Capitol on 6 January – minutes after voting to acquit the former president in his impeachment trial for that very same act. McConnell, like the Senators who voted in favor of impeachment, was deeply critical of Trump’s conduct leading up to the attack. “They [the mob] did this because they’d been fed wild falsehoods by the most powerful man on Earth because he was angry he lost an election,” McConnell said. But McConnell argued the Senate could not convict Trump because he had left office before the Senate trial began – a timeline McConnell orchestrated as Senate majority leader after refusing Democrats’ requests to call the Senate into an emergency session in January. The House impeached Trump for a second time in his final days in office, but McConnell delayed starting the Senate trial until after Joe Biden was sworn in. McConnell said the Senate was not meant to serve as a “moral tribunal” and said Trump could still be open to criminal prosecution. more...

*** History will not be kind to Trump and the Republican Party. Once again, Republicans have violated their oath of office and voted once again to protect Trump. Republicans have shown repeatedly that the only care about law and order and our constitution when they are using it as a weapon against the democrats. ***

Domenico Montanaro

The U.S. Senate on Saturday acquitted former President Donald Trump on an impeachment charge of inciting an insurrection. The acquittal comes more than a month after a mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol as lawmakers were counting the electoral results that certified Trump's loss. Five people died in the riot, including a police officer. Two other officers later killed themselves. A majority of senators voted to convict Trump — 57 to 43, including seven Republicans. But two-thirds, or 67 votes, was needed to convict. It was the second time Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial. The seven GOP senators who voted to convict Trump on Saturday were: Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Trump is the first president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House twice, and the first to be tried for impeachment after leaving office. more...

The Associated Press

Donald Trump was acquitted Saturday of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic second impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions -- and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43 in favor of conviction, short of the required two-thirds majority. Seven Republicans broke from their party and joined all Democrats to vote in favor of finding Trump guilty. The Republicans voting to find Trump guilty were Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania. Minnesota Sens. Tina Smith and Amy Klobuchar joined all their Democratic colleagues in supporting conviction. “The facts and the evidence were overwhelming — former President Donald Trump lied for months to his supporters, summoned them to Washington, and incited a violent insurrection against our government and our democracy,” Smith said in a written statement issued after the vote. “I voted to convict because no reasonable person could believe this would have happened without his betrayal.” more...

There’s no doubt who must be held responsible for attacking the Capitol and trying to overturn the results of the election.
By The New York Times Editorial Board

If you fail to hold him accountable, it can happen again. This is the heart of the prosecution’s argument in the ongoing impeachment trial of Donald Trump. It is a plea for the senators charged with rendering a verdict not to limit their concerns solely to the events of Jan. 6, when a mob of Trump supporters sacked the U.S. Capitol, but also to act with an eye toward safeguarding the nation’s future. To excuse Mr. Trump’s attack on American democracy would invite more such attempts, by him and by other aspiring autocrats. The stakes could not be higher. A vote for impunity is an act of complicity. It is unfortunate that the country finds itself at this place at this moment, American pitted against American. But there is no more urgent task than recentering the nation’s political life as peaceful and committed to the rule of law. more...

Joshua Zitser

Former first lady Melania Trump has been "bitter and chilly" toward her husband since they left Washington DC, according to CNN. She is disappointed by how she departed the White House, the media outlet reported. At the time of leaving office, the former first lady was exceptionally unpopular. She had the worst favorability ratings for any modern first lady at the time of her departure from the White House, according to polling conducted by SSRS for CNN. more...

CNN political analyst and renowned Watergate reporter, Carl Bernstein, calls former President Donald Trump "the most evil force in the White House that we have ever seen." video...

By Celine Castronuovo

Former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley issued stunning remarks breaking with former President Trump, telling Politico in an interview published Friday that she believes he “let us down.” “We need to acknowledge he let us down,” Haley, who served in her ambassador role under Trump, said. “He went down a path he shouldn’t have, and we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.” Haley’s remarks are her strongest yet against the former president in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which was spurred by Trump’s repeated unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud that altered the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. more...

Opinion by Frida Ghitis

(CNN) One reason to put an impeached president on trial after he has left office is to deliver a clear, decisive verdict that the defendant's actions were abhorrent and should never happen again. But there are other reasons, and some have to do with our time -- with what happens now. On the third day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, House impeachment managers made the urgent case that Trump is not only directly responsible for the events of January 6, when his followers attacked the US Capitol, but that failure to find him guilty leaves the country at risk from another Trump-led insurgency. If convicted, the US Senate could then vote to bar Trump from running again. "I'm not afraid of Donald Trump running again in four years and winning," said Rep. Ted Lieu, a House impeachment manager. "I'm afraid he's going to run again and lose, because he can do this again." more...

Trump’s attempt to pressure Georgia officials could lead to felony charges.
By Ian Millhiser

Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis took office just over a month ago, and she’s already taking aim at someone who, until very recently, was the most powerful man in the country. On Wednesday, Willis sent letters to four of Georgia’s top officials informing them that her office has “opened an investigation into attempts to influence the administration of the 2020 Georgia General Election.” Though the letters do not mention former President Donald Trump by name, the New York Times reports that they are “related to his intervention in Georgia’s election.” In an additional sign that Trump is the subject of this probe, the letters note that “at this stage, we have no reason to believe that any Georgia official is a target of this investigation.” In early January, Trump called Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, and suggested that Raffensperger should “find 11,780 votes” for Trump in a state that President Joe Biden won by 11,779 votes. more...

Analysis by Daniel Dale, CNN

Washington (CNN) Former President Donald Trump has never publicly admitted that he was rejected by American voters. But now his lawyer has. On the floor of the US Senate. Bruce Castor Jr.'s performance at the outset of Trump's second impeachment trial will likely be remembered more for his aimless rambling than anything else. But Castor's Tuesday monologue was also noteworthy for something he said while attempting to get to a rare point. Castor argued that the real reason Trump was impeached again is that his opponents in the House Democratic majority do not want to see him run in the 2024 election. (If two-thirds of senators present vote to convict Trump, a simple majority of senators could then decide to ban Trump from holding future office.) Castor said the decision on who serves as the next president should be left up to the American people. And Castor said: "The people are smart enough ... to pick a new administration if they don't like the old one. And they just did." Then, soon after, Castor added that this is commonplace: "The people get tired of an administration they don't want. And they know how to change it. And they just did." Castor's assertion about what the people "just did" is obvious to anyone who is willing to acknowledge reality. Except Trump has tried hard to create an alternative reality. more...

Georgia prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump's January 2 phone call to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger asking him to find enough votes to surpass Joe Biden and overturn the presidential election result in that state. video...

“When you’re removed from the platform, you’re removed from the platform,” the company said.
By Haley Messenger

Twitter will uphold its ban on former President Donald Trump, even if he were to run for office again, according to the company's chief financial officer. “When you’re removed from the platform, you’re removed from the platform,” Twitter CFO Ned Segal told CNBC in an interview on Wednesday morning. “Our policies are designed to make sure that people are not inciting violence,” Segal said. “He was removed when he was president and there’d be no difference for anybody who’s a public official once they’ve been removed from the service.” Segal also pushed back against claims that users may have fled to other social media platforms in response to Trump’s removal. “We added 40 million people to our DAU [daily active user count] last year, and 5 million last quarter,” Segal said. “In January, we added more DAU than the average of the last four Januarys, so hopefully that gives people a sense for the momentum we’ve got from all the hard work we’ve done on the service.” more...

Palm Beach town council gave short shrift to a request from neighbors to ban the former president from residing at his resort
Guardian staff and agency

His impeachment trial was happening a thousand miles away but the “mayor of Mar-a-Lago” was also facing another inquisition. Is Donald Trump allowed to reside at his private resort in Florida, where he flew off to from the White House on 20 January, on Air Force One without even attending Joe Biden’s inauguration? The Palm Beach town council spent close to seven hours on Tuesday considering issues important to the wealthy island community: the availability of the coronavirus vaccine. more...

The former president was frustrated with the meandering arguments. Some close to his defense team quit watching.
By GABBY ORR and MERIDITH MCGRAW

For former President Donald Trump, the opening day of his second impeachment trial did not go as planned or to his liking. Cocooned at his Mar-a-Lago estate, Trump watched as his defense attorneys responded to an emotional presentation by House impeachment managers with a series of dry, technical and at times meandering arguments about due process and the constitutionality of the proceedings. As they droned on, he grew increasingly frustrated with the sharp contrast between their muted response and the prosecution’s opening salvo, according to two people familiar with his thinking. more...

David Jackson USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The gavel-to-gavel television coverage of his impeachment trial this week returned former President Donald Trump to the place he loves best: the political spotlight. The historic second impeachment trial, which began Tuesday, focuses on accusations that he incited a violent insurrection Jan. 6 with his actions and words before the assault on the Capitol by pro-Trump rioters seeking to overturn the presidential election. Democrats, and some Republicans, say his actions should bar him from future office and render his support radioactive. Supporters call the trial a election-style attack that will likely help Trump politically, at least among Republican voters. Both arguments underscore Trump's own words, in a tweet, right before the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol: "Remember this day forever!" Most people expect Trump to be acquitted, but the Senate trial isn't just about the verdict. more...

What was said between the two leaders is a great mystery, one that advisers to the current president say is imperative to find out.
By NATASHA BERTRAND and DANIEL LIPPMAN

Few Trump-era mysteries are as intriguing as what the 45th president said to Vladimir Putin in at least a dozen rambling, off-the-cuff calls and meetings over four years. Understanding what was said between the two could help illuminate whether Trump ever revealed sensitive information or struck any deals with the Kremlin leader that could take the new administration by surprise. Now that President Joe Biden is in the White House, he can see for himself. “They don’t need our approval to see those [records],” a former Trump White House official said, referring to the new Biden national security team. “Biden owns all the call materials. There is only one president at a time.” The Biden White House did not comment on whether it had seen the content of the calls. But so far, at least, the National Security Council has not registered any complaints with their ability to access relevant call records from the previous administration. more...

Michael Cohen, former President Donald Trump's lawyer, who served jail time for campaign finance violations, tax fraud and bank fraud, speaks with Stormy Daniels on his podcast, "Mea Culpa," and apologizes. video...

By Amy Gardner

Last year, Philadelphia lawyer Michael T. van der Veen filed a lawsuit against then-President Donald Trump accusing him of making “repeated claims” that mail voting is ripe with fraud “despite having no evidence in support of these claims.” This week, van der Veen is adopting a different posture as part of the team of attorneys defending Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election result in his Senate impeachment trial. How a longtime personal-injury lawyer found himself at the center of that trial, which opened Tuesday, may say more about his client than his own legal career. Trump struggled to find lawyers to take on his case, parting ways with several who were unwilling to claim that the 2020 election was stolen, as the president is said to have wanted them to do. more...

The account is one of the last remaining Twitter handles affiliated with the former president and his aides that is accessible on the platform.
By QUINT FORGEY

As President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trail commenced on Tuesday, the Twitter account that formerly belonged to his reelection campaign's rapid response team posted commentary on the proceedings and criticism of congressional Democrats. One tweet from the "Trump War Room" account issued on Tuesday afternoon targeted Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who is presiding over Trump's trial in his capacity as president pro tempore of the Senate. "Imagine having a 'trial' where the 'judge' had already voted to convict the defendant?" the tweet read. "That's what happens in banana republics, third world dictatorships and now the United States Senate. SAD!" The "Trump War Room" account is one of the last remaining Twitter accounts affiliated with Trump and his aides that is accessible on the platform. more...

The Parler social network, popular among right-wing commenters, has been offline since January.
Stephen Shankland | CNET

Parler offered the Trump Organization a 40% ownership stake in the company if then-President Donald Trump posted comments exclusively to the conservative social network, Buzzfeed News reported Friday. Negotiations started last summer and were revived in November after Trump lost the presidential election. In June 2020, members of Trump's campaign met with senior management of Parler, Buzzfeed reported, but the White House legal counsel stopped the talks. When talks resumed, Parler proposed that Trump post to Parler four hours before posting to other social networks. Trump wasn't part of the negotiations, Buzzfeed reported, and no deal was struck. more...

By Jeremy Herb and Manu Raju, CNN

(CNN) The House impeachment managers on Thursday requested Donald Trump testify at his upcoming Senate impeachment trial, in a dramatic move to try to get the former President on the record about his conduct surrounding the January 6 riots at the Capitol. But Trump's legal team quickly responded by rejecting the invitation in a terse response to the House impeachment team, putting the decision back on the Democrats over whether to try to compel Trump's testimony with a subpoena. Lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin sent a letter to Trump's attorney Thursday requesting that Trump testify before or during the upcoming impeachment trial, which begins on Tuesday, arguing that his testimony was needed after he disputed the House's allegations that he incited the insurrection at the Capitol. more...

Published Thu, Feb 4 20214:21 PM ESTUpdated Thu, Feb 4 20214:28 PM EST
Dan Mangan, Sarah Whitten

Donald Trump quits — SAG! He still can’t tweet, but the former president was quick to dash off a sharp resignation letter to a union representing actors, broadcasters and performing artists, after the group threatened to remove him. Trump on Thursday penned the snippy note to say he was quitting SAG-AFTRA after the union took steps to potentially revoke his membership for having incited the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. “Who cares!” Trump wrote to SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Cateris, who publicly released the missive soon after getting it. more...

By Veronica Stracqualursi and Jim Acosta, CNN

Washington (CNN) Former President Donald Trump lost reelection over voters' dissatisfaction with his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic, his own pollster said in a post-campaign report, disputing the key argument Trump has repeatedly made that he lost because of voter fraud, despite a lack of evidence. Voters felt President Joe Biden was "better to handle coronavirus" than Trump, according to a post-2020 election analysis of publicly available survey data from Trump's campaign pollster, Tony Fabrizio. The pandemic "was the most important issue" among voters in 10 key states and that Biden carried those voters "nearly 3 to 1," Fabrizio says in a 27-page analysis which rests on average results from the National Election Pool exit polls conducted for CNN and other media as well as AP's VoteCast. "While (Trump) dominated among voters focused on the economy, Biden won Coronavirus voters, which was a bigger share of the electorate," said the report, which was dated December 2020. It came to light on Monday night after Politico first reported on it. The 10 states Fabrizio focused on were Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas. Biden and Trump each won five. Though his job approval was mixed in those 10 states, Trump "earned negative marks on handling of Coronavirus," the report said. more...

Abigail Rosenthal

The longshot lawsuit Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton brought to the Supreme Court to challenge and invalidate election results in four swing states wasn't drafted by Paxton, but by former President Donald Trump's lawyers, a detailed report from the New York Times revealed. A report from the New York Times examining the 77 days Trump spent attempting to challenge the 2020 presidential election results reveals that a team of lawyers close to Trump's campaign drafted the lawsuit Paxton brought to the Supreme Court after Paxton was the only attorney general willing to do so. Paxton brought the lawsuit to the Supreme Court in December, where it was quickly rejected after the justices said Texas couldn't challenge other states' election results, the Houston Chronicle's Taylor Goldenstein previously reported. The lawsuit Trump deemed "the big one" sought to turn over election results in Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states President Joe Biden won, alleging that those states made last-minute changes to election policies that were unconstitutional. more...

By John Kruzel

Former President Trump left office as numerous lawsuits against him and his administration still hung in the balance, a result that legal experts say was part of a calculated strategy to run out the clock and avoid accountability while in the White House. By dragging his feet in court, Trump evaded subpoenas for his tax returns and dodged a final ruling on whether his continued business dealings violated the Constitution’s ban on profiting off the presidency. His administration also upended the legal process, experts say, by treating emergency requests to the Supreme Court as a standard litigation move, often with success. “The administration foot-dragged and played the courts in very different ways in these cases," said Steven Schwinn, a law professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "But the bottom line was always the same: drag these disputes out in court and effectively achieve their policy goals.” Some legal actions focused on Trump, like efforts to obtain his tax returns, are expected to continue post-presidency. But experts say that while he was in office, Trump's drain-the-clock strategy allowed him to avoid accountability and carry out policies before their lawfulness was ultimately resolved, leaving key questions about executive power unanswered as President Biden took office Jan. 20. “The goal was to stretch this out until after the election,” said Norm Ornstein, a scholar at the center-right American Enterprise Institute. more...

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