"Where you can find almost anything with A Click A Pick!"
Go to content
Donald J. Trump After the White House

The Trump Presidency is over, it started with lie and 30,000 lies later, it ended with lies, over 400,000 Americans dead many who would not have die if not for Trump’s lies. Trump's first lie was about the size of his inauguration claiming it was bigger than Obama it was not. Here are some but not all of his lies. He lied about contacts his campaign had with Russians. He lied about his attempt to force the Ukraine to help him dig up dirt on Biden so he could win the 2020 election. Trump’s lies about the coronavirus caused the deaths of 400,000 Americans maybe more. Trump attempted multiple coups, cause sedition, incited insurrection and the sacking of the capitol of the United States of America. Trump ended his presidency with a lie about the election claiming he won more votes than Biden did he did not. That lie lead to sedition, insurrection and the sacking of the capitol of the United States of America. This page is Tracking Donald J. Trump after his time in the White House.

Analysis by Marshall Cohen

Washington (CNN) Former President Donald Trump flouted the limits of presidential power unlike any of his recent predecessors, leaving behind a legacy of unmatched abuses that range from violations of longstanding norms to potentially criminal behavior. It was hard to keep track amid the daily deluge of controversial tweets and distractions that were a hallmark of the Trump presidency. And some of the most egregious abuses of power weren't clear at the time but came into focus after exhaustive investigations. To chronicle Trump's most consequential abuses of power, CNN spoke with a politically diverse group of constitutional scholars, presidential historians and experts on democratic institutions. While these 16 experts did not agree on everything, there was consensus that Trump's pattern of abusing his powers for personal or political gain reached an alarming level that hasn't been seen in modern history, and will have long-lasting consequences for the future of American democracy. Here is a breakdown of Trump's 10 most significant abuses of power. more...

Hours after the United States voted, the president declared the election a fraud — a lie that unleashed a movement that would shatter democratic norms and upend the peaceful transfer of power.
By Jim Rutenberg, Jo Becker, Eric Lipton, Maggie Haberman, Jonathan Martin, Matthew Rosenberg and Michael S. Schmidt

By Thursday the 12th of November, President Donald J. Trump’s election lawyers were concluding that the reality he faced was the inverse of the narrative he was promoting in his comments and on Twitter. There was no substantial evidence of election fraud, and there were nowhere near enough “irregularities” to reverse the outcome in the courts. Mr. Trump did not, could not, win the election, not by “a lot” or even a little. His presidency would soon be over. Allegations of Democratic malfeasance had disintegrated in embarrassing fashion. A supposed suitcase of illegal ballots in Detroit proved to be a box of camera equipment. “Dead voters” were turning up alive in television and newspaper interviews. The week was coming to a particularly demoralizing close: In Arizona, the Trump lawyers were preparing to withdraw their main lawsuit as the state tally showed Joseph R. Biden Jr. leading by more than 10,000 votes, against the 191 ballots they had identified for challenge. more...


By Oscar Quine

Federico G. Klein, a former mid-level aide at the State Department, is the first member of the Trump administration to face criminal charges in connection with the January 6 storming of the capital. Klein was arrested in Virginia for charges including unlawful entry, violent and disorderly conduct, obstructing Congress and law enforcement, and assaulting an officer with a dangerous weapon, Samantha Shero, a spokesperson for the Bureau's Washington Field Office, confirmed Thursday. In videos, Klein is seen wearing a red "Make America Great Again" cap while assaulting officers with a stolen riot shield. According to a court document filed by the FBI, Klein was still employed by the State Department and possessed a Top Secret security clearance at the time of the alleged offence. more...

Federico Klein, a former State Department aide, was picked up Thursday on charges stemming from the Jan. 6 takeover of Congress.
By JOSH GERSTEIN

The FBI on Thursday arrested Federico Klein, a former State Department aide, on charges related to the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6, marking the first known instance of an appointee of President Donald Trump facing criminal prosecution in connection with the attempt to block Congress from certifying President Joe Biden’s victory. Klein, 42, was taken into custody in Virginia, said Samantha Shero, a spokesperson for the FBI’s Washington Field Office. An FBI lookout bulletin issued two weeks after the Capitol assault included a photo of Klein, prompting two tipsters to contact the FBI and finger him as the man in that picture, according to an affidavit filed in federal court in Washington. The affidavit says video from police body-worn cameras on Jan. 6 shows Klein jamming a riot shield into doors at the Capitol as police were trying to secure them to keep the mob out. Klein was also heard on video trying to encourage others to clash with the police, the complaint says. more...

By Christina Zhao

Fears of another Capitol attack have ramped up in the days and hours leading up to March 4, the next significant date in the QAnon calendar. Despite countless failed Q predictions, supporters of former President Donald Trump and the proliferating conspiracy theory believe that Thursday will be the day that the ex-president will be inaugurated again.

On Wednesday, the United States Capitol Police (USCP) announced that they had uncovered threats by militia groups to breach the Capitol building on March 4. The "possible plot" appeared to be connected to the QAnon theory that Trump would return to office on that date, when presidents were inaugurated pre-1933.

"The United States Capitol Police Department is aware of and prepared for any potential threats towards members of Congress or towards the Capitol complex," authorities said in a statement. "We have obtained intelligence that shows a possible plot to breach the Capitol by an identified militia group on Thursday, March 4." more...

The Infowars host, who profits from pandering to Trump’s base, was filmed in an expletive-laden tirade against him in 2019.
By Josephine Harvey

Conspiracy theorist and far-right talk radio host Alex Jones, who has promoted Donald Trump to his audience extensively for years, is heard in a newly leaked video expressing disgust at the former president in 2019. “It’s the truth, and I’m just going to say it. That I wish I never would have fucking met Trump,” Jones says in the footage. “I wish it never would have happened. And it’s not the attacks I’ve been through. I’m so sick of fucking Donald Trump, man. God, I’m fucking sick of him. And I’m not doing this because, like, I’m kissing his fucking ass, you know. It’s, like, I’m sick of it.” Filmmaker Caolan Robertson, who shot a propaganda film called “You Can’t Watch This” with the Infowars host, leaked the footage to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Hatewatch initiative, which monitors far-right extremism in the U.S. more...

By Sophie Lewis

Hydroxychloroquine should not be used to prevent or treat COVID-19, the World Health Organization (WHO) advised this week. The anti-inflammatory drug was once touted by former President Donald Trump, who said he was taking the treatment to prevent contracting coronavirus last spring. A panel of WHO experts found that the drug has no meaningful effect on deaths or hospitalizations due to coronavirus. They added that it may even increase the risk of adverse effects. With high certainty, "the guideline development panel made a strong recommendation against the use of hydroxychloroquine for individuals who do not have covid-19," the panel wrote in the peer-reviewed medical journal The BMJ on Tuesday. more...

President Joe Biden publicly received both doses of the Pfizer vaccine in an effort to boost confidence about its safety and efficacy.
By Dartunorro Clark and Monica Alba

Former President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump quietly received the Covid-19 vaccine at the White House in January, a Trump advisor told NBC News on Monday. It is not clear which type of vaccine they received and they were not disclosed at the time by the Trump White House. This news was first reported by The New York Times. Trump, who spent months publicly downplaying the virus' impact and eschewing mask-wearing, announced in October that he had tested positive for Covid-19. The first lady also tested positive, but they both later recovered. more...

By David Zurawik | Baltimore Sun

One hour into his rambling, grievance-filled speech to the Conservative Political Action Conference on Sunday night, former President Donald Trump had his big moment. He had already said multiple times that he won the 2020 presidential election but that it was stolen from him. Now, however, he uttered the magical, dumbed-down catchphrase that his audience wanted to hear. “The election was rigged,” he shouted, and the crowd rose to its feet to give him a standing ovation. And then as he posed and beamed amid the applause like the late fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, the audience started to chant: “You won. You won. You won.” more...

Opinion by Scott Jennings

(CNN) Donald Trump's return to the national stage at the Conservative Political Action Convention (CPAC) was about what I expected: In a two-track speech where he was intermittently bored by a teleprompter and amused by his own adlibs, he teased a third presidential run, came home to his animating issue, immigration (which was inexplicably absent from his 2020 reelection campaign) and continued the farce that he actually won last November. He even ran through a "hit list" of Republicans to be ousted from the party. Of note was Trump shooting down the idea of a third party, which is actually a good impulse. Republicans cannot win with a fractured party, nor can they win if it gets any smaller. I don't understand the quest by some Republicans to shrink the party. The GOP just lost the White House by nearly 7 million votes and hasn't won the national popular vote in a presidential election with someone other than a Bush since 1984. Republicans lost the White House and don't control either house of Congress in Washington, despite the relative equilibrium in the congress. more...

By Maeve Reston, CNN

(CNN) Former President Donald Trump repeated his election lies on stage at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida, Sunday, looking to reclaim his role as the Republican Party's kingmaker in the 2022 midterm elections and positioning himself for a 2024 presidential run. "It is far from being over," Trump said. "We will be victorious and America will be stronger and greater than ever before." Repeating his false claims that he won the November election, which President Joe Biden won resoundingly with 306 to Trump's 232 electoral votes, Trump teased a White House run in four years: "I may even decide to beat them for a third time," the one-term former President said in his first public remarks since leaving the White House. more...

By Erik Larson

Donald Trump’s niece is balking at the former president’s claim that she waited too long to file her multi-million dollar fraud suit against him, saying she would have sued sooner if he hadn’t covered his tracks so well. Mary Trump on Friday asked a judge to deny Donald Trump’s motion to dismiss the suit, which she filed in September against her uncle and his siblings, Robert Trump and Maryanne Trump Barry. She claims they conspired to skim tens of millions of dollars off her stake in the family business for decades after her father died and left them as her fiduciaries. The suit by the daughter of Donald Trump’s late older brother, Fred Trump Jr., is one of several serious legal threats the former president faces as a private citizen. If the case in New York state court in Manhattan survives, he could be deposed under oath by the end of the year or early 2022. more...

*** No matter what Republicans and right wing media say it was not Antifa is was Trump supporters, white supremacist and Qanon who arrack the United States Capitol. ***

By Marshall Cohen, CNN

(CNN) Nearly a dozen Trump supporters charged in connection with the US Capitol insurrection have said that Antifa and other left-wing groups weren't involved in the attack, debunking a false-flag conspiracy theory that is gaining popularity in the pro-Trump orbit. The baseless claim that left-wing infiltrators were responsible for the violent attack has been promoted by former President Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers, several GOP lawmakers and at least one speaker at the Conservative Political Action Conference Friday morning. Many of the alleged rioters facing charges also embraced this conspiracy. But according to a CNN review of court documents, nearly a dozen defendants have explicitly pushed back, saying that they and other Trump supporters deserve the credit for storming the Capitol -- not Antifa. "There's a lot of memes and posts flying around saying that the people who were fighting last night were all Antifa provocateurs etc.," defendant Jose Padilla allegedly posted to Facebook one day after the January 6 attack. "I just want to say that as a first hand observer of every point of last night, that it was not Antifa. They were Patriots who were trying to Restore the Republic." more...

Mike Redmond

While today’s Republicans are predominantly Evangelical Christians, they clearly missed the part in The Bible about building false idols. In a move that truly captures the apocalyptic vibes of his presidency, Bloomberg’s William Turton captured footage of a golden statue of Donald Trump being wheeled around CPAC on Thursday, and people are having a blast dunking on the graven image. Shortly after the footage hit Twitter, “Golden Calf” started trending as religious leaders and others pointed out the awkward (and hypocritical) Biblical implications of turning Trump into a golden idol, which is a big no-no, according to Christian scripture. And, yet, that’s definitely a gilded Trump wearing American flag shorts. more...

By Nicole Lyn Pesce

Comments like ‘the GOP worship a golden crook’ spread across Twitter faster than you can say ‘Moses’. This is pure Twitter gold. The 2021 Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, kicked off in Orlando, Fla., this week with someone wheeling in a golden statue of Donald Trump. And the inevitable comparisons to the Old Testament story of the Israelites worshiping a false idol in the form of a golden calf spread across social media faster than you can say “Moses.” In fact, “golden calf” and related terms like “Moses” and “CPAC” were soon trending on Friday morning. more...

By Sonia Moghe and Kara Scannell, CNN

(CNN) Donald Trump Jr. was deposed as part of the Washington, DC, attorney general's lawsuit alleging the misuse of Trump inaugural funds, according to a new court filing, the latest investigation in which the former President's children have surfaced.
In a court document dated Tuesday, DC Attorney General Karl Racine's office revealed the former President's son was deposed on February 11. The filing states that Trump's deposition "raised further questions about the nature" of a hotel invoice Racine's office has been investigating. The attorney general's office alleges that the Trump Organization signed a contract with the Loews Madison hotel for $49,358.92 for a block of rooms during the 2017 inauguration, and that the invoice was later forwarded to the Presidential Inaugural Committee, which then paid the bill, according to the filing. more...

The ex-president sure sounds like a guy who’s committed all manner of tax fraud.
By Bess Levin

Every U.S. president since Jimmy Carter has released their tax returns with the exception, of course, of Donald Trump. After lying about being unable to share them due to a “routine audit” and claiming that he would do so just as soon as he got the green light, Trump proceeded to spend the next four-plus years doing everything in his power to ensure such information never saw the light of day—almost as though he had something to hide! So you can imagine his reaction when the Supreme Court decided on Monday to reject his last-ditch attempt to shield his returns, which certainly sounds like that of a guy who’s committed all manner of tax fraud and is concerned about the possibility of spending a good chunk of his twilight years in prison. more...

The former president is stuck with a money-losing monument to his administration’s graft, and so is Washington.
By Zach Everson

For three years, the lobby of the Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C., was the hedonistic center of the MAGA-verse. The room glittered with chandeliers and the flashes of sabers slicing open Champagne bottles (prefaced by the ringing of a bell to draw eyeballs to the spectacle). Trumpworld luminaries like Corey Lewandowski and Sebastian Gorka schmoozed bar-side with established D.C. power brokers. Republican politicians on their way to backroom fundraisers stopped for selfies with star-struck customers swigging $9 Bud Lights. Proud Boys chatted up top presidential advisers. Once, pictures from the hotel lobby showed Trump Cabinet members, foreign leaders, compliant GOP lawmakers, CEOs, lobbyists, Hill staffers, and the MAGA faithful. more...

By Teo Armus

The only Democrat on Georgia’s state election board on Sunday called on Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger (R) to investigate possible civil and criminal violations committed by President Trump during a phone call over the weekend in which the president pressured Raffensperger to “find” enough votes to overturn his defeat. David J. Worley, an Atlanta lawyer, said a transcript of the hour-long call, a recording of which was obtained by The Washington Post, amounted to “probable cause” to believe that Trump had violated Georgia election code. “It’s a crime to solicit election fraud, and asking the secretary to change the votes is a textbook definition of election fraud,” he said in an interview with The Post on Sunday. more...

The Daily Beast has learned that investigators have been asking questions in recent days about Trump’s eldest son as they expand their criminal probe into Trump’s business empire.
Asawin Suebsaeng, Lachlan Cartwright

For months, some of Donald Trump’s top advisers have assured him that he has virtually nothing to fear from the Manhattan district attorney’s tax investigation, which they view as merely “fishing” for information. But investigators with the D.A.'s office have been expanding their criminal probe into Trump’s business empire, asking questions and grilling witnesses—as recently as in the past few days—not only about Trump but particularly about his eldest son, Don Jr., and Allen Weisselberg, one of the former president’s most trusted officers, The Daily Beast has learned. This latest round of interest in Trump Jr. and Weisselberg’s activities, as well as other new developments, underscore the resources and the gravity that New York prosecutors are devoting to the investigation, just as Trump continues to publicly decry the probe as another example of Democrats picking on him. more...

Grace Dean

Luxury fashion retailer Gucci won't be leaving Manhattan's Trump Tower any time soon. That's according to a report in the The New York Times detailing a deal from 2020 in which Gucci, the Trump Tower's biggest commercial tenant, renegotiated and extended its lease in the building at 721-725 Fifth Avenue. The paper cited two people with knowledge of the deal. The 20-year lease the company took in 2006 was due to expire in 2026. Gucci got a reduction in rent after agreeing to expand its lease beyond this date, the sources said. Gucci declined to comment to the Times, and The Trump Organization did not respond to the paper's request for comment. Gucci had asked the Trump Organization to sign confidentiality agreements regarding the terms of the lease, one person who had seen the lease told the publication. more...

Mike McIntire

When New York prosecutors finally get to examine the federal tax returns of former President Donald Trump, they will discover a veritable how-to guide for getting rich while losing millions of dollars and paying little to no income taxes. Whether they find evidence of crimes, however, will also depend on other information not found in the actual returns. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday cleared the way for the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr., to obtain eight years of Trump’s federal income tax returns and other records from his accountants. The decision capped a long-running legal battle over prosecutors’ access to the information. more...

Dan Mangan

New York Attorney General Letitia James said Monday that her office is continuing to actively investigate the Trump Organization’s alleged inflation and deflation of property values to evade tax liability in the state and receive other financial benefits. James also said that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to allow the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to obtain eight years of former President Donald Trump’s income tax returns and other financial records as part of a criminal investigation would not affect her own ongoing civil probe. That ruling, issued Monday, “doesn’t change the tenor of our lawsuit,” James said in an interview for The New York Times’ DealBook DC Policy Project. “We will continue our investigation and upon completion we will announce our findings,” James said. more...

Jeanine Santucci USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — As the Senate Judiciary Committee weighed Merrick Garland's confirmation as attorney general Monday, the fate of former President Donald Trump also looms for the Biden Justice Department. Federal judge Garland, who last served in the Justice Department during the Clinton administration and was blocked as Barack Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court, will likely face pointed questions about Trump during his confirmation hearing. Trump, meanwhile, has lost any "presidential immunity" in a number of legal issues as he returns to life as a private citizen — not only stemming from his speech on Jan. 6 preceding the Capitol assault, but also regarding his business dealings and defamation cases for comments he made about women who accused him of sexual assault. more...

Daniels sued Trump for defamation after he dismissed her claims of being threatened to keep quiet about the tryst as a "total con job."
By The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal from porn star Stormy Daniels, who sought to revive a defamation lawsuit she filed against former President Donald Trump. The justices did not comment in leaving in place a lower court ruling dismissing the case. Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, alleges she had an affair with Trump in 2006 and was paid $130,000 as part of a nondisclosure agreement days before the 2016 presidential election. She sued him for defamation after he dismissed her claims of being threatened to keep quiet about the tryst as a “total con job.” A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit in 2018 and ordered Daniels to pay nearly $300,000 in attorneys’ fees. more...

By John Kruzel

The Supreme Court on Monday rebuffed a bid by former President Trump to shield his tax returns and other financial records from a New York grand jury subpoena. The justices issued the order in the long-running dispute between Trump and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. (D) without comment or noted dissents. “The work continues,” Vance tweeted in response. The Supreme Court on Monday rebuffed a bid by former President Trump to shield his tax returns and other financial records from a New York grand jury subpoena. The justices issued the order in the long-running dispute between Trump and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. (D) without comment or noted dissents. “The work continues,” Vance tweeted in response. The court’s order comes in response to an emergency request Trump filed in October to the Supreme Court after losing several rounds in the lower courts. Vance's office has sought Trump's records since 2019, when a New York grand jury issued a subpoena to Trump's accounting firm, Mazars USA, for eight years of the former president's personal and business tax returns and other financial records. more...

By Jason Lemon

Arkansas GOP Governor Asa Hutchinson said Sunday that he would not support Donald Trump if the former president sought a second term in the White House in 2024, arguing that this would "hurt" Republicans. Hutchinson, who easily won reelection in 2018, will not be able seek reelection in 2022 due to term limits in Arkansas. The Republican governor is one of a number of prominent GOP lawmakers to come out against Trump in the wake of the January 6 riot against the U.S. Capitol carried out by the then president's supporters. During an interview with CNN on Sunday morning, Hutchinson said that Trump "will only define our party if we let him define our party." more...

By April Siese

Two ice skating rinks in Central Park that are operated by the Trump Organization will remain open for the remainder of the season, CBS New York reports. The rinks were originally set to close Sunday at 4 p.m. because New York City is cutting ties with the Trump Organization due to the Capitol riot. "New York City kids deserve all the time on the ice they can get this year," Bill Neidhardt, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's press secretary, said in a statement. "The Wollman and Lasker rinks will stay open under current management for the few weeks left in this season. But make no mistake, we will not be doing business with the Trump Organization going forward. Inciting an insurrection will never be forgotten or forgiven." more...

Declan Walsh

NAIROBI, Kenya — Erik Prince, the former head of the security contractor Blackwater Worldwide and a prominent supporter of former President Donald Trump, violated a United Nations arms embargo on Libya by sending weapons to a militia commander who was attempting to overthrow the internationally backed government, according to U.N. investigators. A confidential U.N. report obtained by The New York Times and delivered by investigators to the Security Council on Thursday reveals how Prince deployed a force of foreign mercenaries, armed with attack aircraft, gunboats and cyberwarfare capabilities, to eastern Libya at the height of a major battle in 2019. As part of the operation, which the report said cost $80 million, the mercenaries also planned to form a hit squad that could track down and kill selected Libyan commanders. more...

By Katelyn Polantz, CNN

(CNN) A leader in an alleged Oath Keepers conspiracy in the US Capitol insurrection claims she was given a VIP pass to the pro-Trump rally on January 6, had met with Secret Service agents and was providing security for legislators and others, including in their march to the Capitol, according to a new court filing. Attorneys for Ohio Oath Keeper Jessica Watkins detail how the efforts among paramilitants who are now accused of conspiracy on January 6 were closer to the apparatus around then-President Donald Trump and his rally than was previously known. By sharing the new details in the filing Saturday, the defense attorney for Watkins, a former Army ranger who served in Afghanistan, argues for her release from jail on bond and other restrictions as she awaits trial. more...

Trump’s critics – and the donors backing them – are scrambling fast to try to prise control away from the pro-Trump majority
Peter Stone

Some four dozen Republican donors were on a fundraising conference call on 5 February with Liz Cheney, the congresswoman and only Republican House leader to vote for Donald Trump’s impeachment for his role in the mob attack on the Capitol on 6 January. Many of the donors on the Cheney call are expected to donate the maximum amount of $5,800 to her 2022 re-election campaign before the end of the first quarter of this year, to ward off a primary challenge to her which Trump loyalists like congressman Matt Gaetz are encouraging, said Michael Epstein, a leading Maryland Republican donor. “We want to show a really big cycle for her to scare off competition,” Epstein said in an interview. “We want people who make judgments based on what’s right.” more...

By Dominick Mastrangelo

Nearly half of Republicans say they would abandon the party as it is currently structured and join a new party if former President Trump was its leader, according to a new poll released Sunday. A Suffolk University-USA Today poll found that 46 percent of Republicans said they would abandon the GOP and join the Trump party if the former president decided to create one. Only 27 percent said they would stay with the GOP, with the remainder indicating they would be undecided.  "We feel like Republicans don't fight enough for us, and we all see Donald Trump fighting for us as hard as he can, every single day," a Republican and small-business owner from Milwaukee told the newspaper. "But then you have establishment Republicans who just agree with establishment Democrats and everything, and they don't ever push back." Trump has not indicated the details of his political future. But after his acquittal in his second impeachment trial, Trump issued a scathing rebuke of Republican leadership, specifically Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) more...

By Jim Acosta, CNN

(CNN) Former President Donald Trump will speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida, next Sunday, according to a source familiar with the matter. The source, who is familiar with the former President's speech, told CNN on Saturday that "he'll be talking about the future of the Republican Party and the conservative movement." "Also look for the 45th President to take on President Biden's disastrous amnesty and border policies," the source added. The speaking engagement would mark Trump's first public appearance following his departure from the White House last month and comes as senior Republicans are split over how to treat the former President, with his loyalists paying him visits recently in Florida. more...

Cocooned in Mar-a-Lago, the newly acquitted ex-president is stepping up his political activities.
By GABBY ORR and MERIDITH MCGRAW

There’s no longer a chief of staff to screen his calls and he keeps no predictable working hours. So an unspoken rule has governed Donald Trump’s calendar since he left Washington last month: To sit down with the former president, you must belong to his posh Palm Beach club or know how to contact him directly. But even that won’t always do it. For weeks now, Trump has rejected meetings with everyone from former South Carolina governor and 2024 hopeful Nikki Haley to House and Senate GOP candidates vying for his ear — preferring to spend his days leisurely calling friends, binging cable news, golfing with a rotating cast of partners and basking in standing ovations whenever he arrives for dinner on Mar-a-Lago’s outdoor patio. One person close to the ex-president said he’s become “unreachable” to anyone outside his limited circle of loyal aides, longtime friends and die-hard political allies. more...

By Jack Dutton

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT) launched another scathing attack on former President Donald Trump, accusing him of dividing the United States into a "dark and dangerous place" by continuously claiming the November election results were fraudulent. In a statement entered into a congressional record that was released on Thursday, the Utah lawmaker said Trump's denial of the election results was "one of the most reprehensible acts" possible and warned that the perpetuation of this "big lie" threatens the American people. Romney was one of seven Republicans who joined all 50 Democrats in the upper chamber to vote for convicting Trump at his second impeachment trial. Although a majority was obtained, it fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict him. more...

Rachel Maddow reports on the distinguished background of attorney Mark Pomerantz, whose work as a mob lawyer helped define RICO prosecutions, and who has been made a special assistant district attorney by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, dedicated to the investigation of Donald Trump's business dealings. Aired on 02/19/2021. video...

The United States formally rejoins the Paris Agreement today, after former President Trump withdrew from the treaty. President Biden has called climate change the "number one issue facing humanity," CBS News climate and energy reporter Cara Korte joins "CBSN AM" to talk about the significance of the world's second-biggest carbon emitter rejoining the global effort to address the climate crisis. video...

By Jonathan Easley and Juliegrace Brufke

Allies of former President Trump say he’s determined to make life miserable for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). Trump’s political machine, which has $60 million in a super PAC and an unmatched grass-roots fundraising apparatus, is vowing to go aggressively after GOP lawmakers in primaries in the wake of an unprecedented feud between the nation’s two most powerful Republicans. Trump was prepared to give McConnell a pass, sources in his orbit stated, after he gave a blistering post-impeachment floor speech saying the former president was “practically and morally” responsible for the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol that led to five deaths and the evacuation of Congress. more...

By Alex Gangitano

The war between former President Trump and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is likely to turn into a battle over money as Republican donors will be forced to choose between Trump-backed and GOP-establishment candidates. The fundraising rift could prove detrimental to Republicans, who are seeking to flip both the House and Senate in the 2022 midterm elections. Trump blasted McConnell this week after the Senate GOP leader said Trump was responsible for the Jan. 6 riot. Trump vowed to back primary opponents who are more aligned with his base, setting up a battle over the future of the Republican party. Many Republican donors are avoiding taking sides publicly for now, but strategists see signs of things to come in 2022 and 2024. more...

By Daniella Diaz and Manu Raju, CNN

Washington (CNN) Rep. Steve Scalise, the No. 2 House Republican, privately met with former President Donald Trump in Florida earlier this week, the latest example of the splintering views among leading congressional Republicans on the role Trump plays in the party going forward. "He's in Florida this week on political travel and had meetings at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday and touched base with President Trump while he was there," Scalise's spokeswoman Lauren Fine told CNN. Politico first reported the meeting.
The visit comes at a time when the GOP is split over Trump's legacy in the party as it moves forward in the Biden era. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy also visited with Trump at Mar-a-Lago a few weeks ago and most House Republicans -- with the notable exception of GOP conference chair Liz Cheney -- view Trump as a force in the party. But Trump's support is less pronounced in the Senate, where GOP leader Mitch McConnell and John Thune, the No. 2 Senate Republican who faces reelection in South Dakota next year, have both worked to distance themselves from the former President in recent weeks. more...

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and the NAACP are using the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 in a lawsuit against former President Donald Trump and others.
By Char Adams

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and the NAACP are suing former President Donald Trump and his longtime ally Rudy Giuliani for allegedly conspiring with a pair of hate groups to storm the U.S. Capitol and block the Electoral College count in January. And they’re using a 150-year-old law as the basis of the suit. Thompson and the NAACP, the nation's oldest civil rights organization, allege in the suit, obtained by NBC News, that Trump, Giuliani, the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers used “intimidation, harassment, and threats,” to stop the vote count and caused the Jan. 6 Capitol riot in the process. This, they said, violated the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871. “I guess it tells you something when you can use a Ku Klux Klan law from the 1870s,” said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University. “It’s part of a series of laws enacted after the Civil War. Everything old is, unfortunately, new again." more...

Lucas Ropek

A ransomware gang claims to have stolen over 100 gigabytes of data from Jones Day, a prominent global law firm that recently stirred backlash for its entanglement in the 2020 presidential election. The hacker group CL0P has posted a large tranche of stolen files to a dark web “leak site,” claiming it snatched them from the law firm during a recent cyberattack. Such sites will typically be used by hackers to goad a victim into paying a ransom. CL0P’s site is publicly available we have independently verified its existence. Databreaches.net initially reported the breach yesterday. According to reporting from the Wall Street Journal, CL0P claims to have reached out to the law firm about the hack in an apparent bid to initiate ransom negotiations: more...

The civil rights group brought the suit on behalf of Representative Bennie Thompson of Mississippi, with other Democrats in Congress expected to join as plaintiffs.
By Annie Karni

WASHINGTON — The N.A.A.C.P. on Tuesday morning filed a federal lawsuit against former President Donald J. Trump and his personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, claiming that they violated a 19th century statute when they tried to prevent the certification of the election on Jan. 6. The civil rights organization brought the suit on behalf of Representative Bennie Thompson, Democrat of Mississippi. Other Democrats in Congress — including Representatives Hank Johnson of Georgia and Bonnie Watson Coleman of New Jersey — are expected to join as plaintiffs in the coming weeks, according to the N.A.A.C.P.

The lawsuit contends that Mr. Trump and Mr. Giuliani violated the Ku Klux Klan Act, an 1871 statute that includes protections against violent conspiracies that interfered with Congress’s constitutional duties; the suit also names the Proud Boys, the far-right nationalist group, and the Oath Keepers militia group. The legal action accuses Mr. Trump, Mr. Giuliani and the two groups of conspiring to incite a violent riot at the Capitol, with the goal of preventing Congress from certifying the election. more...

By: Associated Press

The lawsuit from Mississippi’s Rep. Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, is part of an expected wave of litigation over the Jan. 6 riot and is believed to be the first filed by a member of Congress. It seeks unspecified punitive and compensatory damages. The case also names as defendants the Republican former president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and groups including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, extremist organizations that had members charged by the Justice Department with taking part in the siege.

Lawyers for Trump have denied that he incited the riot. A Trump adviser didn’t immediately comment about the lawsuit on Tuesday, and a lawyer for Giuliani did not immediately return an email seeking comment. The suit, filed in federal court in Washington under a Reconstruction-era law known as the Ku Klux Klan Act, comes three days after Trump was acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial that centered on allegations that he incited the riot, in which five people died. That acquittal is likely to open the door to fresh legal scrutiny over Trump’s actions before and during the siege. more...

By COLLEEN LONG

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump’s acquittal at his second impeachment trial may not be the final word on whether he’s to blame for the deadly Capitol riot. The next step for the former president could be the courts. Now a private citizen, Trump is stripped of his protection from legal liability that the presidency gave him. That change in status is something that even Republicans who voted on Saturday to acquit of inciting the Jan. 6 attack are stressing as they urge Americans to move on from impeachment. “President Trump is still liable for everything he did while he was in office, as an ordinary citizen, unless the statute of limitations has run,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said after that vote. He insisted that the courts were a more appropriate venue to hold Trump accountable than a Senate trial. “He didn’t get away with anything yet,” McConnell said. “Yet.” The insurrection at the Capitol, in which five people died, is just one of the legal cases shadowing Trump in the months after he was voted out of office. He also faces legal exposure in Georgia over an alleged pressure campaign on state election officials, and in Manhattan over hush-money payments and business deals. more...

Wall Street Journal says prosecutors interested in loans relating to four Manhattan properties
Police officers stand guard in front of Trump Tower in New York.
Edward Helmore

While there was good news for Donald Trump in Washington on Saturday, as his second impeachment trial ended in acquittal, troubling news came out of his native New York. The Wall Street Journal reported that prosecutors in the city are investigating about $280m in loans to the Trump Organization, related to four buildings in Manhattan: Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue; a skyscraper at 40 Wall St; a hotel and residential building on Columbus Circle near Central Park; and an apartment building on the Upper East Side. The investigations appear to be an extension of a previously acknowledged move by Manhattan’s Democratic district attorney, Cyrus Vance Jr, over what prosecutors have called “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization”. Trump has described the New York investigation, triggered by an alleged $130,000 hush-money payment to the adult film star Stormy Daniels over an alleged sexual liaison, as “a continuation of the worst witch-hunt in American history”. more...

The word "traitor" was spray-painted on the front of the attorney's driveway.
By Bill Hutchinson

Vandals targeted the home of one of former President Donald Trump's impeachment lawyers, spray-painting the word "TRAITOR" in red on his driveway in suburban Philadelphia, police said. The vandalism occurred around 8 p.m. on Friday at attorney Michael van der Veen's residence in West Whiteland Township, Pennsylvania, about 30 miles southwest of Philadelphia, according to police. No arrests have been made, Detective Scott Pezick of the West Whiteland Township Police Department told ABC News on Sunday afternoon. Pezick said private security has since been hired by the homeowner to protect the residence, and police presence has been beefed up in van der Veen's neighborhood. more...

Our View: Of the 100 Senate jurors who heard Donald Trump’s impeachment case, over 15 senators were more co-conspirators than independent judges.
The Editorial Board | USA TODAY

The fact that the Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump of inciting insurrection is a stain on America’s most prestigious legislative body. The facts were plain. But more than a stain, the Senate has a sickness as well. Of the 100 jurors who heard Trump’s impeachment case, at least 16 were more co-conspirators in Trump’s efforts to overturn a free and fair election than they were independent judges. Eight voted last month to overturn Joe Biden’s election victory — the precise outcome the Trump-inspired insurrectionists sought when they left his rally and marched to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Republican Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Josh Hawley of Missouri, Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi, John Neely Kennedy of Louisiana, Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming, Roger Marshall of Kansas, Rick Scott of Florida and Tommy Tuberville of Alabama attempted to derail America’s centuries-old experiment in democracy. more...

Democrats won the impeachment witness fight when Trump’s team agreed to enter evidence of the call showing his dereliction of duty in the Capitol attack.
Norman Eisen and Katherine Reisner

Despite the shameful failure of 43 senators to honor their oaths, the outcome of the Senate impeachment trial offered hope for the cause of accountability for former President Donald Trump and others who backed the Big Lie that gave us the Jan. 6 insurrection: that the 2020 election was stolen. The denouement was by far the largest number of Republicans ever to cross party lines to convict a president of their own party in an impeachment trial. Seven did so, as opposed to the single such vote in Trump's prior impeachment.

When the trial resumed Saturday morning, it was expected that there would be no witnesses. Then a bipartisan 55-45 vote opened the door to the testimony from at least one person — Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Washington. She had information about a phone conversation in the middle of the insurrection in which Trump seemed to welcome the violent chaos — revealing his impeachable intent to incite the mob. Negotiations then led to a compromise: a “stipulation,” or agreement by both sides, that her statement about Trump’s bad intent would be admitted into the record. more...

Tim O'Donnell

These days, it can often feel like former President Donald Trump is off the grid, but he made himself known Saturday shortly after he was acquitted in a Senate impeachment trial for the second time in just over a year. In a statement, Trump thanked his legal team and the lawmakers who voted not guilty, while blasting Democrats, whom he accused of getting a "free pass to denigrate the rule of law." The impeachment effort, Trump claimed, was "another phase" of what he considers "the greatest witch hunt" in American history. more...

Senate minority leader says Trump ‘practically and morally responsible’ for Capitol riot, but votes not guilty regardless
Amanda Holpuch

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell said on Saturday that Donald Trump was “practically and morally responsible” for the insurrection at the US Capitol on 6 January – minutes after voting to acquit the former president in his impeachment trial for that very same act. McConnell, like the Senators who voted in favor of impeachment, was deeply critical of Trump’s conduct leading up to the attack. “They [the mob] did this because they’d been fed wild falsehoods by the most powerful man on Earth because he was angry he lost an election,” McConnell said. But McConnell argued the Senate could not convict Trump because he had left office before the Senate trial began – a timeline McConnell orchestrated as Senate majority leader after refusing Democrats’ requests to call the Senate into an emergency session in January. The House impeached Trump for a second time in his final days in office, but McConnell delayed starting the Senate trial until after Joe Biden was sworn in. McConnell said the Senate was not meant to serve as a “moral tribunal” and said Trump could still be open to criminal prosecution. more...

*** History will not be kind to Trump and the Republican Party. Once again, Republicans have violated their oath of office and voted once again to protect Trump. Republicans have shown repeatedly that the only care about law and order and our constitution when they are using it as a weapon against the democrats. ***

Domenico Montanaro

The U.S. Senate on Saturday acquitted former President Donald Trump on an impeachment charge of inciting an insurrection. The acquittal comes more than a month after a mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol as lawmakers were counting the electoral results that certified Trump's loss. Five people died in the riot, including a police officer. Two other officers later killed themselves. A majority of senators voted to convict Trump — 57 to 43, including seven Republicans. But two-thirds, or 67 votes, was needed to convict. It was the second time Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial. The seven GOP senators who voted to convict Trump on Saturday were: Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Trump is the first president in U.S. history to be impeached by the House twice, and the first to be tried for impeachment after leaving office. more...

The Associated Press

Donald Trump was acquitted Saturday of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic second impeachment trial that spared him the first-ever conviction of a U.S. president but exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions -- and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43 in favor of conviction, short of the required two-thirds majority. Seven Republicans broke from their party and joined all Democrats to vote in favor of finding Trump guilty. The Republicans voting to find Trump guilty were Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania. Minnesota Sens. Tina Smith and Amy Klobuchar joined all their Democratic colleagues in supporting conviction. “The facts and the evidence were overwhelming — former President Donald Trump lied for months to his supporters, summoned them to Washington, and incited a violent insurrection against our government and our democracy,” Smith said in a written statement issued after the vote. “I voted to convict because no reasonable person could believe this would have happened without his betrayal.” more...

There’s no doubt who must be held responsible for attacking the Capitol and trying to overturn the results of the election.
By The New York Times Editorial Board

If you fail to hold him accountable, it can happen again. This is the heart of the prosecution’s argument in the ongoing impeachment trial of Donald Trump. It is a plea for the senators charged with rendering a verdict not to limit their concerns solely to the events of Jan. 6, when a mob of Trump supporters sacked the U.S. Capitol, but also to act with an eye toward safeguarding the nation’s future. To excuse Mr. Trump’s attack on American democracy would invite more such attempts, by him and by other aspiring autocrats. The stakes could not be higher. A vote for impunity is an act of complicity. It is unfortunate that the country finds itself at this place at this moment, American pitted against American. But there is no more urgent task than recentering the nation’s political life as peaceful and committed to the rule of law. more...

Joshua Zitser

Former first lady Melania Trump has been "bitter and chilly" toward her husband since they left Washington DC, according to CNN. She is disappointed by how she departed the White House, the media outlet reported. At the time of leaving office, the former first lady was exceptionally unpopular. She had the worst favorability ratings for any modern first lady at the time of her departure from the White House, according to polling conducted by SSRS for CNN. more...

CNN political analyst and renowned Watergate reporter, Carl Bernstein, calls former President Donald Trump "the most evil force in the White House that we have ever seen." video...

By Celine Castronuovo

Former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley issued stunning remarks breaking with former President Trump, telling Politico in an interview published Friday that she believes he “let us down.” “We need to acknowledge he let us down,” Haley, who served in her ambassador role under Trump, said. “He went down a path he shouldn’t have, and we shouldn’t have followed him, and we shouldn’t have listened to him. And we can’t let that ever happen again.” Haley’s remarks are her strongest yet against the former president in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which was spurred by Trump’s repeated unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud that altered the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. more...

Opinion by Frida Ghitis

(CNN) One reason to put an impeached president on trial after he has left office is to deliver a clear, decisive verdict that the defendant's actions were abhorrent and should never happen again. But there are other reasons, and some have to do with our time -- with what happens now. On the third day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, House impeachment managers made the urgent case that Trump is not only directly responsible for the events of January 6, when his followers attacked the US Capitol, but that failure to find him guilty leaves the country at risk from another Trump-led insurgency. If convicted, the US Senate could then vote to bar Trump from running again. "I'm not afraid of Donald Trump running again in four years and winning," said Rep. Ted Lieu, a House impeachment manager. "I'm afraid he's going to run again and lose, because he can do this again." more...

Trump’s attempt to pressure Georgia officials could lead to felony charges.
By Ian Millhiser

Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis took office just over a month ago, and she’s already taking aim at someone who, until very recently, was the most powerful man in the country. On Wednesday, Willis sent letters to four of Georgia’s top officials informing them that her office has “opened an investigation into attempts to influence the administration of the 2020 Georgia General Election.” Though the letters do not mention former President Donald Trump by name, the New York Times reports that they are “related to his intervention in Georgia’s election.” In an additional sign that Trump is the subject of this probe, the letters note that “at this stage, we have no reason to believe that any Georgia official is a target of this investigation.” In early January, Trump called Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, and suggested that Raffensperger should “find 11,780 votes” for Trump in a state that President Joe Biden won by 11,779 votes. more...

Analysis by Daniel Dale, CNN

Washington (CNN) Former President Donald Trump has never publicly admitted that he was rejected by American voters. But now his lawyer has. On the floor of the US Senate. Bruce Castor Jr.'s performance at the outset of Trump's second impeachment trial will likely be remembered more for his aimless rambling than anything else. But Castor's Tuesday monologue was also noteworthy for something he said while attempting to get to a rare point. Castor argued that the real reason Trump was impeached again is that his opponents in the House Democratic majority do not want to see him run in the 2024 election. (If two-thirds of senators present vote to convict Trump, a simple majority of senators could then decide to ban Trump from holding future office.) Castor said the decision on who serves as the next president should be left up to the American people. And Castor said: "The people are smart enough ... to pick a new administration if they don't like the old one. And they just did." Then, soon after, Castor added that this is commonplace: "The people get tired of an administration they don't want. And they know how to change it. And they just did." Castor's assertion about what the people "just did" is obvious to anyone who is willing to acknowledge reality. Except Trump has tried hard to create an alternative reality. more...

Georgia prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump's January 2 phone call to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger asking him to find enough votes to surpass Joe Biden and overturn the presidential election result in that state. video...

“When you’re removed from the platform, you’re removed from the platform,” the company said.
By Haley Messenger

Twitter will uphold its ban on former President Donald Trump, even if he were to run for office again, according to the company's chief financial officer. “When you’re removed from the platform, you’re removed from the platform,” Twitter CFO Ned Segal told CNBC in an interview on Wednesday morning. “Our policies are designed to make sure that people are not inciting violence,” Segal said. “He was removed when he was president and there’d be no difference for anybody who’s a public official once they’ve been removed from the service.” Segal also pushed back against claims that users may have fled to other social media platforms in response to Trump’s removal. “We added 40 million people to our DAU [daily active user count] last year, and 5 million last quarter,” Segal said. “In January, we added more DAU than the average of the last four Januarys, so hopefully that gives people a sense for the momentum we’ve got from all the hard work we’ve done on the service.” more...

Palm Beach town council gave short shrift to a request from neighbors to ban the former president from residing at his resort
Guardian staff and agency

His impeachment trial was happening a thousand miles away but the “mayor of Mar-a-Lago” was also facing another inquisition. Is Donald Trump allowed to reside at his private resort in Florida, where he flew off to from the White House on 20 January, on Air Force One without even attending Joe Biden’s inauguration? The Palm Beach town council spent close to seven hours on Tuesday considering issues important to the wealthy island community: the availability of the coronavirus vaccine. more...

The former president was frustrated with the meandering arguments. Some close to his defense team quit watching.
By GABBY ORR and MERIDITH MCGRAW

For former President Donald Trump, the opening day of his second impeachment trial did not go as planned or to his liking. Cocooned at his Mar-a-Lago estate, Trump watched as his defense attorneys responded to an emotional presentation by House impeachment managers with a series of dry, technical and at times meandering arguments about due process and the constitutionality of the proceedings. As they droned on, he grew increasingly frustrated with the sharp contrast between their muted response and the prosecution’s opening salvo, according to two people familiar with his thinking. more...

David Jackson USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The gavel-to-gavel television coverage of his impeachment trial this week returned former President Donald Trump to the place he loves best: the political spotlight. The historic second impeachment trial, which began Tuesday, focuses on accusations that he incited a violent insurrection Jan. 6 with his actions and words before the assault on the Capitol by pro-Trump rioters seeking to overturn the presidential election. Democrats, and some Republicans, say his actions should bar him from future office and render his support radioactive. Supporters call the trial a election-style attack that will likely help Trump politically, at least among Republican voters. Both arguments underscore Trump's own words, in a tweet, right before the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol: "Remember this day forever!" Most people expect Trump to be acquitted, but the Senate trial isn't just about the verdict. more...

What was said between the two leaders is a great mystery, one that advisers to the current president say is imperative to find out.
By NATASHA BERTRAND and DANIEL LIPPMAN

Few Trump-era mysteries are as intriguing as what the 45th president said to Vladimir Putin in at least a dozen rambling, off-the-cuff calls and meetings over four years. Understanding what was said between the two could help illuminate whether Trump ever revealed sensitive information or struck any deals with the Kremlin leader that could take the new administration by surprise. Now that President Joe Biden is in the White House, he can see for himself. “They don’t need our approval to see those [records],” a former Trump White House official said, referring to the new Biden national security team. “Biden owns all the call materials. There is only one president at a time.” The Biden White House did not comment on whether it had seen the content of the calls. But so far, at least, the National Security Council has not registered any complaints with their ability to access relevant call records from the previous administration. more...

Michael Cohen, former President Donald Trump's lawyer, who served jail time for campaign finance violations, tax fraud and bank fraud, speaks with Stormy Daniels on his podcast, "Mea Culpa," and apologizes. video...

By Amy Gardner

Last year, Philadelphia lawyer Michael T. van der Veen filed a lawsuit against then-President Donald Trump accusing him of making “repeated claims” that mail voting is ripe with fraud “despite having no evidence in support of these claims.” This week, van der Veen is adopting a different posture as part of the team of attorneys defending Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election result in his Senate impeachment trial. How a longtime personal-injury lawyer found himself at the center of that trial, which opened Tuesday, may say more about his client than his own legal career. Trump struggled to find lawyers to take on his case, parting ways with several who were unwilling to claim that the 2020 election was stolen, as the president is said to have wanted them to do. more...

The account is one of the last remaining Twitter handles affiliated with the former president and his aides that is accessible on the platform.
By QUINT FORGEY

As President Donald Trump's second Senate impeachment trail commenced on Tuesday, the Twitter account that formerly belonged to his reelection campaign's rapid response team posted commentary on the proceedings and criticism of congressional Democrats. One tweet from the "Trump War Room" account issued on Tuesday afternoon targeted Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), who is presiding over Trump's trial in his capacity as president pro tempore of the Senate. "Imagine having a 'trial' where the 'judge' had already voted to convict the defendant?" the tweet read. "That's what happens in banana republics, third world dictatorships and now the United States Senate. SAD!" The "Trump War Room" account is one of the last remaining Twitter accounts affiliated with Trump and his aides that is accessible on the platform. more...

The Parler social network, popular among right-wing commenters, has been offline since January.
Stephen Shankland | CNET

Parler offered the Trump Organization a 40% ownership stake in the company if then-President Donald Trump posted comments exclusively to the conservative social network, Buzzfeed News reported Friday. Negotiations started last summer and were revived in November after Trump lost the presidential election. In June 2020, members of Trump's campaign met with senior management of Parler, Buzzfeed reported, but the White House legal counsel stopped the talks. When talks resumed, Parler proposed that Trump post to Parler four hours before posting to other social networks. Trump wasn't part of the negotiations, Buzzfeed reported, and no deal was struck. more...

By Jeremy Herb and Manu Raju, CNN

(CNN) The House impeachment managers on Thursday requested Donald Trump testify at his upcoming Senate impeachment trial, in a dramatic move to try to get the former President on the record about his conduct surrounding the January 6 riots at the Capitol. But Trump's legal team quickly responded by rejecting the invitation in a terse response to the House impeachment team, putting the decision back on the Democrats over whether to try to compel Trump's testimony with a subpoena. Lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin sent a letter to Trump's attorney Thursday requesting that Trump testify before or during the upcoming impeachment trial, which begins on Tuesday, arguing that his testimony was needed after he disputed the House's allegations that he incited the insurrection at the Capitol. more...

Published Thu, Feb 4 20214:21 PM ESTUpdated Thu, Feb 4 20214:28 PM EST
Dan Mangan, Sarah Whitten

Donald Trump quits — SAG! He still can’t tweet, but the former president was quick to dash off a sharp resignation letter to a union representing actors, broadcasters and performing artists, after the group threatened to remove him. Trump on Thursday penned the snippy note to say he was quitting SAG-AFTRA after the union took steps to potentially revoke his membership for having incited the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. “Who cares!” Trump wrote to SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Cateris, who publicly released the missive soon after getting it. more...

By Veronica Stracqualursi and Jim Acosta, CNN

Washington (CNN) Former President Donald Trump lost reelection over voters' dissatisfaction with his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic, his own pollster said in a post-campaign report, disputing the key argument Trump has repeatedly made that he lost because of voter fraud, despite a lack of evidence. Voters felt President Joe Biden was "better to handle coronavirus" than Trump, according to a post-2020 election analysis of publicly available survey data from Trump's campaign pollster, Tony Fabrizio. The pandemic "was the most important issue" among voters in 10 key states and that Biden carried those voters "nearly 3 to 1," Fabrizio says in a 27-page analysis which rests on average results from the National Election Pool exit polls conducted for CNN and other media as well as AP's VoteCast. "While (Trump) dominated among voters focused on the economy, Biden won Coronavirus voters, which was a bigger share of the electorate," said the report, which was dated December 2020. It came to light on Monday night after Politico first reported on it. The 10 states Fabrizio focused on were Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas. Biden and Trump each won five. Though his job approval was mixed in those 10 states, Trump "earned negative marks on handling of Coronavirus," the report said. more...

Abigail Rosenthal

The longshot lawsuit Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton brought to the Supreme Court to challenge and invalidate election results in four swing states wasn't drafted by Paxton, but by former President Donald Trump's lawyers, a detailed report from the New York Times revealed. A report from the New York Times examining the 77 days Trump spent attempting to challenge the 2020 presidential election results reveals that a team of lawyers close to Trump's campaign drafted the lawsuit Paxton brought to the Supreme Court after Paxton was the only attorney general willing to do so. Paxton brought the lawsuit to the Supreme Court in December, where it was quickly rejected after the justices said Texas couldn't challenge other states' election results, the Houston Chronicle's Taylor Goldenstein previously reported. The lawsuit Trump deemed "the big one" sought to turn over election results in Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states President Joe Biden won, alleging that those states made last-minute changes to election policies that were unconstitutional. more...

By John Kruzel

Former President Trump left office as numerous lawsuits against him and his administration still hung in the balance, a result that legal experts say was part of a calculated strategy to run out the clock and avoid accountability while in the White House. By dragging his feet in court, Trump evaded subpoenas for his tax returns and dodged a final ruling on whether his continued business dealings violated the Constitution’s ban on profiting off the presidency. His administration also upended the legal process, experts say, by treating emergency requests to the Supreme Court as a standard litigation move, often with success. “The administration foot-dragged and played the courts in very different ways in these cases," said Steven Schwinn, a law professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "But the bottom line was always the same: drag these disputes out in court and effectively achieve their policy goals.” Some legal actions focused on Trump, like efforts to obtain his tax returns, are expected to continue post-presidency. But experts say that while he was in office, Trump's drain-the-clock strategy allowed him to avoid accountability and carry out policies before their lawfulness was ultimately resolved, leaving key questions about executive power unanswered as President Biden took office Jan. 20. “The goal was to stretch this out until after the election,” said Norm Ornstein, a scholar at the center-right American Enterprise Institute. more...

Trump and allies filed scores of lawsuits, tried to convince state legislatures to take action, organized protests and held hearings.. None of it worked.
William Cummings, Joey Garrison and Jim Sergent, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump spent much of the 2020 presidential campaign insisting that he could only lose if the election was rigged against him, and he has spent nearly every day since his defeat claiming his dire predictions of fraud had come to pass. But just as he cried foul before a single vote was cast – something he also did in 2016 – Trump has maintained he was robbed of victory without any credible evidence to support that belief. Despite assurances from his own departments of Justice and Homeland Security that no serious fraud occurred, Trump has raged against the election result and mounted a relentless campaign to reverse President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win. more...

Kevin Breuninger

Lawyers for Donald Trump on Tuesday denied that the former president incited a mob of his supporters to storm the U.S. Capitol, or that he tried to stop Congress from confirming President Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. The arguments in a 14-page filing from Trump’s legal team came one week before his unprecedented second impeachment trial is set to begin in the Senate. Trump was impeached in the House last month on one article of inciting an insurrection. Earlier Tuesday, nine Democratic House impeachment managers shared an 80-page trial brief laying out their case for convicting Trump in the Senate and barring him from ever holding federal office again. Those impeachment managers argued that Trump was “personally responsible” for inciting the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, which left five dead and forced an evacuation by a joint session of Congress, derailing their efforts to confirm Biden’s election win. more...

Alayna Treene

Disagreements over legal strategy weren't the only reason Donald Trump's defense team collapsed just days before his second impeachment trial, Axios has learned. What we're hearing: The notoriously stingy former president and his lead lawyer, Butch Bowers, wrangled over compensation during a series of tense phone calls, sources familiar with their conversations said. The argument came even though Trump has raised over $170 million from the public that could be used on his legal defenses. The two initially agreed Bowers would be paid $250,000 for his individual services, a figure that "delighted" Trump, one of the sources said. However, Trump didn't realize Bowers hadn't included additional expenses — including more lawyers, researchers and other legal fees that would be accrued on the job. He was said to be livid when Bowers came back to him with a total budget of $3 million. Trump called the South Carolina attorney and eventually negotiated him down to $1 million. more...

By Amy Gardner and Karoun Demirjian

House Democrats made their case to convict former president Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol in a sweeping impeachment brief filed with the Senate on Tuesday that accused Trump of whipping his supporters into a “frenzy” and described him as “singularly responsible” for the mayhem that ensued. In the brief, the nine House impeachment managers argue that Trump is not protected by the First Amendment’s freedom of speech provision, which was never intended, they wrote, to allow a president to “provoke lawless action if he loses at the polls.” “If provoking an insurrectionary riot against a Joint Session of Congress after losing an election is not an impeachable offense, it is hard to imagine what would be,” the brief states. Democrats also rejected the claim embraced by many Republicans that it is unconstitutional to convict a president after he has left office — an argument that Trump’s lawyers are expected to make in his defense. more...

By Adam Brewster

Former President Trump's new political action committee brought in more than $30 million during the final weeks of 2020, giving him a large war chest to continue to wield his political influence, even though he is no longer in office. Save America, a leadership PAC created after the general election, entered 2021 with more than $31 million cash on hand, according to an Federal Election Commission filing. The bulk of that money, $30.4 million, was transferred from the Trump Make America Great Again committee. The cash in Save America is just a fraction of what Mr. Trump and Republicans hold in various political committee accounts. His presidential campaign committee still has $10.7 million in the bank. Mr. Trump's joint fundraising committees with the Republican National Committee, Trump Make America Great Again Committee and Trump Victory, have about $63 million cash on hand — although the former president isn't entitled to all of that money. more...

Federal law enforcement shifted resources last year in response to Donald Trump’s insistence that the radical left endangered the country. Meanwhile, right-wing extremism was building ominously.
By Adam Goldman, Katie Benner and Zolan Kanno-Youngs

WASHINGTON — As racial justice protests erupted nationwide last year, President Donald J. Trump, struggling to find a winning campaign theme, hit on a message that he stressed over and over: The real domestic threat to the United States emanated from the radical left, even though law enforcement authorities had long since concluded it came from the far right. It was a message that was quickly embraced and amplified by his attorney general and his top homeland security officials, who translated it into a shift in criminal justice and national security priorities even as Mr. Trump was beginning to openly stoke the outrage that months later would culminate in the storming of the Capitol by right-wing extremists. Mr. Trump’s efforts to focus his administration on the antifa movement and leftist groups did not stop the Justice Department and the F.B.I. from pursuing cases of right-wing extremism. They broke up a kidnapping plot, for example, targeting Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, a Democrat. more...

The 27-page report pins Trump's loss on voter perception that he was untrustworthy and disapproval of his pandemic performance.
By ALEX ISENSTADT

Former President Donald Trump has blamed the election results on unfounded claims of fraud and malfeasance. But at the top levels of his campaign, a detailed autopsy report that circulated among his political aides paints a far different — and more critical — portrait of what led to his defeat. The post-mortem, a copy of which was obtained by POLITICO, says the former president suffered from voter perception that he wasn’t honest or trustworthy and that he was crushed by disapproval of his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. And while Trump spread baseless accusations of ballot-stuffing in heavily Black cities, the report notes that he was done in by hemorrhaging support from white voters. The 27-page report, which was written by Trump chief pollster Tony Fabrizio, shows how Trump advisers were privately reckoning with his loss even as the former president and many of his supporters engaged in a conspiracy theory-fueled effort to overturn the election. The autopsy was completed in December 2020 and distributed to Trump’s top political advisers just before President Joe Biden’s Jan. 20 inauguration. more...

Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large

(CNN) Less than 24 hours after CNN broke the news that Donald Trump's legal team quit just a week before his second impeachment trial is set to begin, the ex-president sent out a press release announcing his new, new team. And it was something. The email subject line? "45th President Donald J. Trump Announces Legal Team." It's first sentence? "45th President Donald J. Trump today announced that highly respected trial lawyers David Schoen and Bruce L. Castor, Jr., will head his impeachment defense legal team, bringing national profiles and significant trial experience in high-profile cases to the effort." The second sentence? "Notably, Schoen has already been working with the 45th President and other advisors to prepare for the upcoming trial, and both Schoen and Castor agree that this impeachment is unconstitutional - a fact 45 Senators voted in agreement with last week." more...

By Katie Shepherd

When Bruce L. Castor Jr. ran for district attorney in Montgomery County, Pa., in 2015, the campaign hinged on his decision years earlier not to charge comedian Bill Cosby with sexual assault. And after Castor lost the race, he sued the woman he blamed for the defeat: one of Cosby’s victims. His suit, which was dismissed in 2018, made national headlines as the prosecutor who defeated him criminally charged Cosby, eventually sending him to prison. Now, Castor is poised to represent another politician dismayed over a recent election loss: former president Donald Trump. Following a sudden exodus of lawyers who had been working on Trump’s defense for his Feb. 9 impeachment trial, the former president on Sunday announced that he’ll be represented by Castor and David Schoen, another attorney with ties to several high-profile, controversial defendants, including Roger Stone and Jeffrey Epstein. more...

By Tim Reid

(Reuters) - Dozens of Republicans in former President George W. Bush's administration are leaving the party, dismayed by a failure of many elected Republicans to disown Donald Trump after his false claims of election fraud sparked a deadly storming of the U.S. Capitol last month. These officials, some who served in the highest echelons of the Bush administration, said they had hoped that a Trump defeat would lead party leaders to move on from the former president and denounce his baseless claims that the November presidential election was stolen. But with most Republican lawmakers sticking to Trump, these officials say they no longer recognize the party they served. Some have ended their membership, others are letting it lapse while a few are newly registered as independents, according to a dozen former Bush officials who spoke with Reuters. more...

By Jim Acosta, Kaitlan Collins, Pamela Brown and Katelyn Polantz, CNN

(CNN) Former President Donald Trump's office announced that David Schoen and Bruce L. Castor, Jr. will now head the legal team for his second impeachment trial, a day after CNN first reported that five members of his defense left and his team effectively collapsed. One point of friction with his previous team was Trump wanted the attorneys to focus on his election fraud claims rather than the constitutionality of convicting a former president. Trump has struggled to find lawyers willing to take his case as he refuses to budge from his false claims. Trump's advisers have been talking to him about his legal strategy and he keeps bringing up election fraud for his defense, while they have repeatedly tried to steer him away from that, according to a source familiar with those discussions. It's unclear whether Schoen and Castor will go along with what Trump wants. more...

Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum

A New York judge Friday increased pressure on former President Donald Trump’s family business and several associates, ordering them to give state investigators documents in a civil inquiry into whether the company misstated assets to get bank loans and tax benefits. It was the second blow that the judge, Arthur F. Engoron of state Supreme Court in Manhattan, had dealt to Trump’s company in recent weeks. In December, he ordered the company, the Trump Organization, to produce records that its lawyers had tried to shield, including some related to a Westchester County, New York, property that is among those being scrutinized by the New York state attorney general, Letitia James. more...

Are we entering a new era of political violence?
By Zack Beauchamp

That the United States made it through President Joe Biden’s inauguration without any major act of violence is a relief. But the fact that we had to be seriously worried about it — to the point of deploying 25,000 National Guard troops to secure Washington, DC — illustrates that the threat of far-right violence is here to stay. Indeed, on January 27, the Department of Homeland Security issued a bulletin warning that the threat from right-wing extremists “will persist in the weeks following the successful Presidential Inauguration” — that extremists “may be emboldened by the January 6, 2021 breach of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. to target elected officials and government facilities.”

A country that once stood itself up as a model of liberal democratic stability is now beginning to reckon with the fact that it is at serious risk of a major wave of political violence. Federal agents have been warning of a surge in far-right violence since at least 2009, but Trump’s malign influence supercharged the threat. The Trump years have seen a flurry of deadly right-wing violence: the murder of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville; 16 pipe bombs mailed to prominent Democrats and media figures; the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue; and then the Capitol assault, a literal attack on the democratic process by an armed mob fueled by bigotry and conspiracy theories. more...

Lloyd Green

The Republican leadership has jettisoned its commitment to democracy and the rule of law and authoritarianism has found a political home. On Tuesday, the US Senate rejected an attempt to kill the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, 55-45, but only five Republicans voted with the majority. Acquittal of the ex-president is now a foregone conclusion. The only question is when. Trump 2024 can still happen. In the short run, his dream won’t die. With another campaign looming over the horizon, the former reality show host can still rake in the bucks to the delight of his family and his creditors. The beast will continue to be fed. Naturally, there were minor casualties. Mitch McConnell, the newly minted minority leader, fell in behind his caucus. His post-Capitol Hill attack theatrics are done, his outrage is over, his hopes for a Trump-free future dashed. On the other hand, Elaine Chao – McConnell’s wife who doubled as Trump’s transportation secretary and resigned in a pique over the storming of the Capitol – has landed on her feet at a conservative thinktank along with Mike Pompeo, Trump’s secretary of state. For Team McConnell, the past can be relegated to the rearview mirror. more...

Tom Porter

Veteran Republican Congressman Tom Cole of Oklahoma told The New York Times that the crisis facing the Republican Party in the wake of Donald Trump's presidency is greater than it faced after the Watergate scandal. "I've been in Republican politics for 40 years professionally — so, just after Watergate — and I will tell you this has been the worst period of the entire time," Cole told the Times. His remarks come amid chaos in the GOP following Trump's departure from office. A rift has between lawmakers who want to distance the party from Donald Trump in the wake of the Capitol riot and his bid to subvert the election and a group who've remained steadfastly loyal to the former president. more...

By Donald Ayer and Dennis Aftergut

Democracy’s future depends on the stories told of the past. They must be told from facts. We have important facts about the Jan. 6. insurrectionists Donald Trump incited to invade the Capitol. Some told an FBI informant that they intended to kill Mike Pence and Nancy Pelosi. They reportedly came within 60 seconds of finding Pence. That close call should compel robust criminal investigations — not only to hold accountable all those who entered the Capitol but also to tell us exactly what Trump knew when he gave his speech that morning inciting the rioters. The facts already known do not cast Trump in a good light. Consider the context: Trump’s increasing desperation on Jan. 6 as the walls closed in on his prospects for holding power. More than 60 courts had rejected Trump’s unfounded legal attempts to overturn the election. more....

By Gloria Borger, Kaitlan Collins, Jeff Zeleny and Ashley Semler, CNN

(CNN) Five of former President Donald Trump's impeachment defense team attorneys have stepped aside a little more than a week before his Senate trial is set to begin, according to people familiar with the case, amid a disagreement over his legal strategy. Butch Bowers and Deborah Barbier, who were expected to be two of the lead attorneys, are no longer on the team. A source familiar with the changes said it was a mutual decision for both to leave the legal team. As the lead attorney, Bowers assembled the team. Josh Howard, a North Carolina attorney who was recently added to the team, has also left, according to another source familiar with the changes. Johnny Gasser and Greg Harris, also from South Carolina, are no longer involved with the case, either. A person familiar with the departures told CNN that Trump wanted the attorneys to argue there was mass election fraud and that the election was stolen from him rather than focus on the legality of convicting a president after he's left office. Trump was not receptive to the discussions about how they should proceed in that regard. more...

By Darragh Roche

Former President Donald Trump officially left office at noon on January 20. He's now been a former president for nearly a week and there's been little indication of what he plans to do next. Many former presidents keep a low profile immediately after leaving office and Trump has been no exception. This may be due to the fact that he was permanently suspended from Twitter, his favorite social media site, as well as a slew of other platforms. Trump is now staying at his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida where he's been spotted playing golf and wearing his trademark "Make America Great Again" baseball cap. He spent a lot of time on the golf course during his four years in the White House. more...

By Danya Hajjaji

Former President Donald Trump's apparent plans to reside in his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida may be in contravention of a 1993 agreement with the Town of Palm Beach, which limits his stay to seven consecutive days and 21 days per year. After leaving Washington, D.C. hours before President Joe Biden's inauguration, Trump and his wife Melania moved to the Palm Springs estate. The change of address, which had taken place over a week ago since the couple's departure from the White House, may pose an issue in the long run. Upon his arrival in Florida, the former president was greeted by a small crowd holding signs such as "Pres. Trump Won" and "Welcome Home." Others, however, were not too enthused by his return. more...

By Bill Powell

Donald Trump's first week out of office ended well. On Tuesday only five Republican senators opposed a motion that declared it unconstitutional to impeach a former president—far from the 17 GOP votes that Democrats would need to find Trump guilty. "He was gratified, because that's certainly his view: that it's unfair and unconstitutional, and he knows it means there's no chance he'll be convicted," says a close friend who spends time with Trump in Mar-a-Lago. (This source and several other Trump friends and advisers requested anonymity in order to speak candidly.) Now Citizen Trump feels confident he'll emerge with a legal and a political win.

Trump has been considering two questions: how to contest the forthcoming Senate trial and how to maintain his political relevance over the next four years. He's getting differing opinions from family members, friends and advisers. Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, former chief White House political strategist Steve Bannon, and a handful of others are pushing him not just to defend against the charge that he incited the January 6th Capitol insurrection, but to use the Senate trial as an opportunity to re-litigate his claims of election fraud in key swing states. "Show everyone the receipts," is how Bannon puts it, referring to evidence of fraud that the Trump team claims to have. more...

Trump has thin skin even when he's golfing. Rick Strom breaks it down. Give us your thoughts in the comments below! video...

Thing 1/Thing 2: The president supposedly shoots a 73 -- which would him one of the best senior golfers in the world. His former partners say he has a secret: He cheats. A lot. video...


By Tara Subramaniam, CNN

Washington (CNN)While Donald Trump's first campaign for president was all about change, his argument for re-election was based on the premise that he had delivered on his initial promises and would continue to do so. The campaign slogan "Promises made, promises kept," became Trump's rallying cry. To be sure, Trump delivered on a number of initial campaign promises. He cut regulations, lowered taxes, withdrew from the Trans Pacific Partnership, pulled the US out of the Paris Climate Agreement and appointed hundreds of conservative justices. But in many cases, the reality behind the talking points and slogans fell short of what was actually promised. Here's a look back at how some of the most notable promises Trump made during his campaigns and throughout his time in office stack up against reality.

The wall
Building a wall on the US border with Mexico (and getting Mexico to pay for it) was one of Trump's flagship promises from his first campaign, though the specific parameters of the wall evolved over time, from 1,000 miles to over 500 miles. Throughout his presidency, Trump acted as if this was one accomplishment he had successfully crossed off the list, continuing to tout the hundreds of miles of wall his administration had built. But the figures he threw out, as recently as in his recorded farewell video, were misleading and didn't live up to what he initially promised. As of January 8, 2021, 453 miles of border barriers were built under the Trump administration, just 47 of which were erected where no barriers had existed before. Of the other 406 miles: 22 miles replaced previously existing dilapidated or outdated secondary barriers, 33 miles were new secondary barriers where there had previously been only primary barriers and 351 miles replaced previously existing primary barriers that the government considered dilapidated or outdated. While these replacement barriers are not insignificant, it's worth noting that Trump did not build a new wall. more...

By Nikki Schwab, Senior U.S. Political Reporter For Dailymail.com

As President Donald Trump has headed south, so has the see-and-be-seen nature of his Washington, D.C. hotel, once a hub for sightings of Trump family members and allies - and even the president himself. On Thursday night, six tables of people were seated in the expansive Benjamin Bar and Lounge, while one table of guests - and later another - dined at the upstairs BLT Prime by David Burke, alongside DailyMail.com.  Gone were fixtures of the Trump hotel: no Rudy Giuliani, no cabinet secretaries, no Republican congressman, no White House aides, no Trump children or in-laws, and no chance of an encounter with the president and his entourage. The property has the three-pronged problem of no more Trumps, COVID restrictions that had kept the restaurants closed for the past month - and signs that suggest business simply isn't wanted. A sign posted to fencing around the hotel's main driveway reads: 'Hotel Guests & Invitees Access Only'. For those who try to venture inside the Pennsylvania Avenue hotel, a guard pops out of a small shed at the edge of the driveway asking what business they have, even though reservations for BLT can be made on the popular OpenTable app. Still, the staff tried their best. more...

By Sonia Moghe, CNN

(CNN) A New York state judge on Friday ordered a tax firm that has worked with former President Donald Trump to turn over more documents to New York Attorney General Letitia James as part of her office's investigation into the Trump Organization. The supplemental order is one of several that Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron has made in the past month requesting that the tax firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius turn over documents that James's office has requested as part of its investigation. The attorney general's office declined to comment. CNN has reached out to the Trump Organization and Morgan, Lewis & Bockius for comment. The Trump Organization has previously argued that the documents are protected by attorney-client privilege, but in December, Engoron ruled that "some but all" of the documents requested by the attorney general's office were privileged. more...

David Smith in Washington

The KGB ‘played the game as if they were immensely impressed by his personality’, Yuri Shvets, a key source for a new book, tells the Guardian. Donald Trump was cultivated as a Russian asset over 40 years and proved so willing to parrot anti-western propaganda that there were celebrations in Moscow, a former KGB spy has told the Guardian. Yuri Shvets, posted to Washington by the Soviet Union in the 1980s, compares the former US president to “the Cambridge five”, the British spy ring that passed secrets to Moscow during the second world war and early cold war. Now 67, Shvets is a key source for American Kompromat, a new book by journalist Craig Unger, whose previous works include House of Trump, House of Putin. The book also explores the former president’s relationship with the disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

“This is an example where people were recruited when they were just students and then they rose to important positions; something like that was happening with Trump,” Shvets said by phone on Monday from his home in Virginia. Shvets, a KGB major, had a cover job as a correspondent in Washington for the Russian news agency Tass during the 1980s. He moved to the US permanently in 1993 and gained American citizenship. He works as a corporate security investigator and was a partner of Alexander Litvinenko, who was assassinated in London in 2006. more...

Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN

(CNN) Former President Donald Trump may be gone from the White House but his legacy of catastrophic mistrust is poisoning Washington, dimming hopes of a unified effort to crush the pandemic before mutant viral strains take root. Nine days after newly sworn-in President Joe Biden told America that "every disagreement doesn't have to be a cause for total war," recriminations between the parties and the Republican meltdown are consuming Congress. It's now clear that the January 6 mob attack on Capitol Hill, while failing in its bid to reverse Trump's election loss, has utterly fractured the basic level of trust needed to make a political system function — at a critical national moment. In the quarter century of bitter political battles since former speaker Newt Gingrich's Republican revolution, Washington has never been this inflamed. more...

Emma Hurt

The Georgia Senate runoffs were the first test of former President Donald Trump's ability to bring his most fervent supporters to the polls without his name on the ballot. And after Republicans lost the seats and their U.S. Senate majority, in Georgia Republican circles, much of the blame has centered on the former president. Trump's refusal to concede his own race and constant questioning of the electoral system's integrity sowed confusion that likely dampened Republican turnout. But it was the campaigns' Trump-centric strategies that left them no room to break away, calling into question the future viability of the strategy in competitive states like Georgia. And with Trump showing no sign of heading toward a quiet post-presidential retirement, the dangers of embracing him too closely could risk other GOP candidates in 2022, when control of the House and Senate could again be up for grabs. more...


To the editor: Senate Republicans have said there should be no trial for former President Trump because of a whole host of reasons (“Forget constitutionalism. Rand Paul’s attempt to preempt Trump’s trial is just brute politics,” Opinion, Jan. 27). Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) says he is concerned about the trial tearing America apart. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) argues that a former president cannot be tried in the Senate. Perhaps Paul is correct. Trump is now an “ordinary” citizen and should be subject to the same justice that everyone else is. I believe there is ample evidence that Trump committed crimes as stated by the article of impeachment. Dozens of people who stormed the Capitol have been arrested. Now that Trump is an ordinary citizen, why has he not been arrested on suspicion of inciting an insurrection? more..

By Michael Warren, CNN

Former President Donald Trump is focusing his political energy on targeting Rep. Liz Cheney, the third-ranking House Republican, who voted for Trump's impeachment earlier this month. According to one source, Trump has repeatedly questioned his Republican allies about efforts to remove Cheney from her leadership position and run a primary candidate against her. He has also been showing those allies a poll commissioned by his Save America PAC that purports to show that Cheney's impeachment vote has damaged her standing in Wyoming, even urging them to talk about the poll on television. Trump's push comes as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is working to shore up his relationship with the former president, including meeting with Trump at his Palm Beach resort Mar-a-Lago on Thursday. McCarthy and Trump discussed the midterm elections in 2022, according to a readout provided by Save America. The statement claimed Trump "has agreed to work with Leader McCarthy" on retaking the majority in the House for the GOP. more...

By Devon M. Sayers, Jamie Gangel and Ryan Nobles, CNN

(CNN) Former President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy met Thursday at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, where the two Republicans discussed strategy for winning the House majority in next year's midterms, according to a readout of the meeting provided by Trump's Political Action Committee Save America. "They discussed many topics, number one of which was taking back the House in 2022," the statement read. "President Trump's popularity has never been stronger than it is today, and his endorsement means more than perhaps any endorsement at any time." The statement described the meeting as "cordial" and highlighted a stronger than expected performance among key House GOP candidates, though Democrats maintained their House majority with a slimmer margin.

McCarthy's visit comes at a tumultuous time for the Republican Party, following Trump's role ahead of the January 6 deadly riot storming the Capitol that led to his second impeachment just days before he left office. Ten House Republicans voted to impeach Trump and the Senate is expected to pick up the former President's trial next month. Still, all but five Republican senators voted earlier this week that such a trial was not constitutional, outlining just some of the divides in the party, as Democrats now control the legislative and executive branches. McCarthy released his own statement confirming Trump's account of the meeting, showing he's in lock-step with the former President. more...

*** Make no mistake about it Donald J. Trump interfered in the 2020 election on multiple levels in an attempted coup. ***

By Ed Kilgore

On December 1, I looked back at Donald Trump’s elaborate efforts to discredit voting by mail and cast doubt on a Biden victory before, during, and after Election Day and asked questions about why his coup had failed. I thought faulty planning, hesitation when it looked like Trump might win without stealing it, a failure to bring Republican state legislators in on the coup, and legal incompetence were all factors. But while I acknowledged Biden’s victory would not be complete until Congress confirmed it on January 6, I didn’t expect Trump was saving his worst offenses against democracy for the very end. Ultimately, Congress did confirm Biden’s win, the mob Trump incited was repulsed, and he has been impeached for his outrageous conduct. But it’s time to ask again: How close did we come to a stolen election, or at least a constitutional crisis? Here are some moments of real peril to consider: more...

Juliana Kaplan

After a tumultuous one-term presidency, a violent insurrection by supporters, and a retirement to Florida, the Trump name has attracted some negative connotations. And his real-estate holdings are feeling the heat: According to Curbed's analysis of a report from real-estate data firm UrbanDigs, Trump-branded Manhattan properties have lost more than 20% of their value since Trump first took office.

UrbanDigs — which looked at the seven luxury buildings in Manhattan that still bear the Trump moniker, and three that used to — found that even properties that formerly had Trump in their names lost 17% of their value since 2016. By comparison, the overall price per square foot decline in Manhattan over the same period was just 9%.

In 2016, the average price per square foot in seven NYC properties run by his real-estate behemoth, the Trump Organization, was $2,065, according to the report. In 2017, following Trump's election and inauguration, that figure sunk to $1,903; by 2020, it was at $1,619. That's a drop of 21% from its 2016 price. more...

Juliana Kaplan

The board of the Trump Plaza condominium complex in West Palm Beach, Florida, last week voted unanimously to remove "Trump" from its name, The Palm Beach Post reported on Tuesday. The vote came after the deadly insurrection by supporters of President Donald Trump in early January. Trump later became the first president to be impeached twice. It's not the first time the Trump Plaza complex has distanced itself from the Trump name. The Palm Beach Post reported last February that residents had voted not to replace Trump Plaza signs that were on top of the towers. And in June, street-level signs were removed amid the protests over the police killing of George Floyd. more...

By Adam Schrader For Dailymail.Com

Palm Beach officials are conducting a 'legal review' of Donald Trump's use of Mar-a-Lago as a residence because of a 1993 permit that restricts long-term stays at the resort. But Eric Trump, the former president's son and an executive vice president of the Trump Organization, said his father is within his rights to stay at the exclusive club as long as he chooses. Trump signed a 'special exception use' agreement in 1993 that let him convert the historic mansion into a for-profit social club. But the agreement includes a clause that limits stays to no more than 10 guests at one time, for no longer than seven days at a time, up to three non-consecutive visits a year. more...

Shawna Chen

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday. "If we can’t get to 67 votes for impeachment, there may be another way to hold President Trump accountable."

Details: The censure resolution will declare that the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol was an insurrection against the Constitution — an effort to stop Congress from "undertaking its constitutional duty to count electoral votes," according to Kaine. It finds that Trump "gave aid and comfort" to the insurrectionists by "repeatedly lying about the election, slandering election officials, pressuring others to come to Washington for a wild event and encouraging them to come up to Congress." more...

The Proud Boys, who have a history of scuffling with left-wing anti-fascist activists, have long been some of Trump’s most vocal, and violent, supporters, and he has returned the favor, telling them during one of the presidential debates to “stand back and stand by.”
By: New York Times
Written by Alan Feuer and Frances Robles

The leadership of the Proud Boys has come under increased scrutiny as agents and prosecutors across the country try to determine how closely members of the far-right nationalist group communicated during the riot at the Capitol this month and to what extent they might have planned the assault in advance, according to federal law enforcement officials. At least six members of the organization have been charged in connection with the riot, including one of its top-ranking leaders, Joseph Biggs. Biggs, a U.S. Army veteran, led about 100 men on an angry march from the site of President Donald Trump’s speech toward — and then into — the Capitol building. more...

By Marshall Cohen, CNN

Washington (CNN) The "Trump defense" is taking shape among some alleged Capitol rioters. One by one, die-hard supporters of former President Donald Trump are now blaming him for their actions that day, after being charged by federal prosecutors and facing possible jail time. A lawyer for one rioter who allegedly attacked police officers with a baseball bat said he was "inspired" by Trump's incendiary speech at a rally beforehand. The so-called QAnon shaman, whose horned bearskin headdress made him go viral, now claims he was "duped" by Trump, his lawyer said. At this point, the statements may be more of a public relations strategy than an articulated legal defense. But they dovetail with Democrats' case in favor of impeaching and convicting Trump; they agree that the former president incited the deadly insurrection that overwhelmed the Capitol on January 6. More than 150 people have been charged in connection with the attack, according to CNN's latest tally. more...

*** Republicans pledge full allegiance to Trump but not to America. ***

Once a producer of centrist Republicans like Arlen Specter and Tom Ridge, the state GOP now bears the MAGA stamp.
By HOLLY OTTERBEIN

PHILADELPHIA — Pennsylvania once stocked D.C. with a steady stream of establishment Republicans. Now, in the wake of Donald Trump’s reelection defeat, it’s better known for its GOP hard-liners — among them, Scott Perry, the congressman who recently made headlines for his behind-the-scenes efforts to assist Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election results in Georgia. The state GOP’s transformation from the party of former Sens. Arlen Specter and John Heinz — and Govs. Dick Thornburgh and Tom Ridge — to a bastion of Trump loyalists has been decades in the making. But the shift has perhaps never been so obvious as in the past two months when Republicans here were repeatedly thrust into the spotlight for their role in trying to override President Joe Biden’s victory. more...

Bill Bostock

Former President Donald Trump has opened a new "Office of the Former President" to announce and drive his future plans from his new base in Florida, as he remains barred from most social media. On Monday, a number of journalists received the first missive from the office, which pledged to carry on the work of the Trump administration. "Today, the 45th President of the United States, Donald J. Trump, formally opened the Office of the Former President," the statement said. "The office will be responsible for managing President Trump's correspondences, public statements, appearances, and official activities to advance the interests of the United States and to carry on the agenda of the Trump Administration through advocacy, organizing, and public activism." more...

By Elena Mejía and Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux

During most of Donald Trump’s presidency, Congress was in a state of persistent deadlock, passing relatively few big pieces of legislation. But the Republican-controlled Senate stayed humming, nonetheless — thanks to a steady stream of judicial nominees from the White House. After only one term, Trump filled 28 percent of vacant seats on the federal bench, including 27 percent of active federal district court judges and 30 percent of active appeals court judges, not to mention three Supreme Court justices. This figure is far higher than for other recent presidents in their first terms — by January 2013, for instance, Barack Obama had appointed just 17 percent of the vacant federal judge spots, and at the end of his first term, George W. Bush had appointed 21 percent. In fact, Obama was able to appoint only a slightly larger share of the federal bench in his eight years in office (31 percent) than Trump managed to do in his one term. more...

Multiple well-placed sources within the tabloid empire said the old boss is still calling the shots from retirement, and still helping his now-ex presidential pal.
Lloyd Grove

Here’s a question for the supermarket tabloid publisher formerly known as American Media Inc.: Is that a Pecker in your pocket or are you still hot for Trump? Yellow journalism purveyor and Donald Trump acolyte David Pecker ostensibly retired as chairman and CEO of the National Enquirer’s financially strapped parent company last August when AMI changed its name to A360 Media as it was being acquired by a marketer of face masks, hand sanitizer, gloves, disinfectant wipes, and vitamin supplements. But he has, allegedly, remained very much in the saddle. The revelation comes amid mass layoffs across A360 Media’s titles—which also include Star magazine, OK!, Globe, Examiner, In Touch, Us Weekly and Life and Style—with significantly curtailed severance packages being offered to a fired workforce that already took a 23-percent pay cut last March, when the COVID-19 pandemic began affecting print-media bottom lines. According to three well-situated A360 Media insiders, the 69-year-old Pecker, nominally just an “executive adviser,” is still driving editorial decisions from his Greenwich, Connecticut, estate and protecting his longtime pal Trump—much as he did during the 2016 campaign. more...

And the worst part? Trump can’t even tweet about it.
Asawin Suebsaeng

In recent days, former President Donald Trump has watched from afar as one of his most popular rivals for public attention has been unleashed by the Biden administration to, in part, disparage Trump’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. And the ex-president hasn’t even been able to tweet about it. Dr. Anthony Fauci, once a prominent figure on Trump’s coronavirus task force who’s now a top COVID-19 adviser to President Joe Biden, began his multi-day blitz to different news outlets that included openly expressing his relief that the old crew was gone and that he could now serve in the Biden administration. “One of the new things in this administration is if you don’t know the answer, don’t guess, just say you don’t know the answer,” Fauci told reporters at the White House on Thursday. He also stressed to journalists during that White House briefing that when he told them about how certain matters had markedly improved after Trump left office, he definitely “wasn’t joking!” more...

The announcement may indicate that the justices are looking to put the Trump era behind them.
By JOSH GERSTEIN

The Supreme Court has effectively shut down two lawsuits alleging that former President Donald Trump was violating the Constitution by profiting from his public office, the court said Monday. The announcement may indicate that the justices are looking to put the Trump era behind them and are not eager to wade into disputes about his personal or business affairs. The outcome in the cases also signals how ineffective the courts proved to be in policing Trump's alleged violations of the emoluments clauses, which prohibit any president from receiving funds related to their official duties from any foreign or state government. more...

The director also called the Capitol breach a ‘very sad day in the history of America’
Andrew Pulver

Spike Lee has likened Donald Trump to Hitler in an acceptance speech at a film critics awards show, adding that “the whole world is laughing at the United States”. The director made his comments when he accepted a special award from the New York Film Critics Circle for his short film New York, New York. The film was released in May 2020 and Lee described it as a “love letter to its people”. Lee said the comments about the Trump were recorded on 6 January, the day of the Capitol breach, which he said was “a very sad day in the history of America”. “We are living in a very serious time in America,” said the director. “His president, President Agent Orange, will go down in history with the likes of Hitler … all his boys, they are going down on the wrong side of history.” more...

By Peter Sblendorio | New York Daily News

It hasn’t been a banner year for former President Donald Trump. A banner, apparently flown near Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida on Sunday, ripped the ex-commander-in-chief, reading “TRUMP WORST PRESIDENT EVER,” according to images shared on social media. The banner can be seen trailing behind a plane in a video shared Sunday by Twitter user Daniel Uhlfelder. more...

Jacob Shamsian

On his way out of office, President Donald Trump issued more than 100 pardons, mostly to his personal friends and political allies. A number of those pardons were for people convicted of federal crimes linked to the Mueller investigation — including his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and advisors Roger Stone and George Papadopoulos. Trump was sure to malign Mueller's investigation in his pardon notices. The press release for Manafort's pardon, for example, said he was "prosecuted in the course of Special Counsel Mueller's investigation, which was premised on the Russian collusion hoax." Though the president's pardon powers are broad, a number of prosecutors and experts on clemency laws don't believe those people are off the hook just yet. more...

By Christina Zhao

Former Donald Trump lawyer Michael Cohen on Sunday expressed his belief that the ex-president had issued pardons for himself, his children and Rudy Giuliani before leaving office. In the early hours of Wednesday morning, Trump granted pardons to 73 individuals and commuted the sentences of an additional 70, including Steve Bannon and rapper Kodak Black. But his list did not include preemptive pardons for himself, his family or Giuliani. Cohen told MSNBC host Alex Witt that he started to ponder why the former president didn't issue pardons for himself, his children or Giuliani after "knowing Donald Trump for well over a decade." more...

By Alexis Benveniste, CNN Business

New York (CNN Business)Many once-loyal members of Mar-a-Lago are leaving because they no longer want to have any connection to former President Donald Trump, according to the author of the definitive book about the resort. "It's a very dispirited place," Laurence Leamer, historian and author of "Mar-a-Lago: Inside the Gates of Power at Donald Trump's Presidential Palace," told MSNBC host Alex Witt on "Weekends with Alex Witt" Saturday. He said members are "not concerned about politics and they said the food is no good." Leamer said he spoke to a number of former members who "silently walked out" after Trump left office. Trump moved to the Palm Beach, Florida, estate after his term ended last week. But without the cachet of the sitting president of the United States working at the estate, guests are finding Mar-a-Lago lost a step. There isn't any entertainment on the property during the pandemic, and Leamer added, "It's a sad place ... it's not what it was." more...

CNN's Randi Kaye reports on dropping revenues among various companies listed on former President Donald Trump's final financial disclosure form amid the Covid-19 pandemic and fallout from the attack on the US Capitol. video...

By Devan Cole, CNN

Washington (CNN)Republican Sen. Mitt Romney said Sunday that he believes holding an impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump is constitutional, a position that puts him at odds with some of his Senate colleagues. "I'll of course hear what the lawyers have to say for each side. But I think it's pretty clear that the effort is constitutional," Romney told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union." The Utah Republican said that he's reviewed law review articles, which have shown that "the preponderance of the legal opinion is that an impeachment trial after someone has left office is constitutional." "I believe that what is being alleged and what we saw, which is incitement to insurrection, is an impeachable offense. If not, what is?" Romney said, referring to the impeachment article passed by the House earlier this month that charges Trump with inciting the deadly US Capitol riot on January 6. more...

By ALANNA DURKIN RICHER and COLLEEN LONG

WASHINGTON (AP) — The words of Donald Trump supporters who are accused of participating in the deadly U.S. Capitol riot may end up being used against him in his Senate impeachment trial as he faces the charge of inciting a violent insurrection. At least five supporters facing federal charges have suggested they were taking orders from the then-president when they marched on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 to challenge the certification of Joe Biden’s election win. But now those comments, captured in interviews with reporters and federal agents, are likely to take center stage as Democrats lay out their case. It’s the first time a former president will face such charges after leaving office. more...

The latest back-and-forth is an example of the type of legal wrangling arising from his administration that will continue to dog Donald Trump.
By TOBY ECKERT

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Treasury Department to give attorneys for former President Donald Trump 72 hours' notice if it decides to turn over Trump’s federal tax returns to House Democrats. District Court Judge Trevor McFadden said the order would last for two weeks, amid uncertainty over how the change in administrations will affect House Ways and Means Chair Richard Neal’s long-running effort to get Treasury to turn over Trump’s returns. McFadden also ordered attorneys for all sides in the case to file a joint status report by Feb. 3. Former Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin refused to surrender Trump’s returns when Neal requested them in 2019. But with Democrat Joe Biden now in the White House, Treasury could decide to hand them over. In a hearing before McFadden, House Counsel Douglas Letter said the committee still wants the returns and hopes Treasury “will follow what we believe is a clear legal obligation” to provide them. more...

"He regrets very very much having...just been duped by the president," said Al Watkins, attorney for Jacob Chansley also known as the 'Qanon Shaman'
Author: PJ Randhawa

ST. LOUIS — The number of arrests associated with the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 continues to grow. On Wednesday, two men from Florida with ties to a far-right extremist group were arrested for taking part in the siege. More than 116 people from around the country are now facing federal charges. A few of those people arrested have ties to the Midwest region. That includes Richard "Bigo" Barnett - from Arkansas - who was seen reclining with his feet on Nancy pelosi's desk during the unrest. Closer to home, there's Emily Hernandez of Sullivan, Missouri. "She's a 21-year-old girl and she's got her whole life ahead of her. She knows this was obviously a mistake and she's ready to move past it," said Ethan Corlija, Hernandez's attorney. more...

The president’s oldest son, who still has a Twitter feed at his disposal, is following in his father’s footsteps
Andrew Naughtie

Permanently deprived of his Twitter presence, Donald Trump has left the presidency relatively quietly – but his most belligerent child has no intention of leaving his father’s successor alone. Even with the Biden administration less than 24 hours old, Donald Trump Jr is rolling out accusations and mockery directed at the new president and the Democrats in general. Having worked hard over the last four years to elevate himself as a scourge of the liberal left, Mr Trump clearly intends to continue playing the role despite his father’s loss. On Thursday morning, he shared a New York Times story about federal agents using anti-riot weapons on protesters in Portland, Oregon the night before. “Joe Biden uses tear gas,” he tweeted. “That’s how this is supposed to work right?” He also complained about supposed media bias against conservatives, a longtime hobby horse for him, his family and his father’s supporters. “Imagine how much easier it is to run as a Democrat,” he wrote, “when you have a multi billion dollar main stream [sic] media complex willing to lie and run cover for you at all times! Our media is broken.” more...

Candidates, donors and local party officials are already organizing against the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump.
By ALEX ISENSTADT

Former President Donald Trump’s supporters are mobilizing to exact revenge on the 10 House Republicans who supported impeachment last week, thrusting the GOP into a civil war just as party leaders are trying to move on from the Trump era. Pro-Trump Republicans are racing to launch primary challenges. The former president’s donors are cutting off the Republican incumbents. And Trump’s political lieutenants are plotting how to unseat them. The unrest shows how Trump is all but certain to cast a shadow over the Republican Party long after he’s left the White House. Trump has split the GOP, pitting his loyalists against those who say he incited the Capitol Hill insurrection and want to expunge him from the party. Whether the Trump-inspired primary challengers succeed is far from clear. Dislodging an incumbent is notoriously difficult, and Republican leaders are expected to move aggressively to protect their members. But the early activity illustrates the degree to which Trump’s staunch allies are determined to make his critics pay a price. more...

The president is hiring a respected legal hand with a familiarity on voting laws as a Senate trial nears.
By GABBY ORR and MERIDITH MCGRAW

Donald Trump appears to be finally getting serious about his upcoming impeachment trial. The former president has hired Butch Bowers, a longtime Republican attorney with experience in election law, to represent him when the Senate considers an article of impeachment, likely in a matter of days or weeks. he hiring comes after Trump opted against building out a war room or communications infrastructure to push back against impeachment when it was considered by the House. The former president had also initially struggled to find someone to lead his impeachment defense, as attorneys who previously represented him declined to sign on for a second trial and suggested his political opponents had a stronger case this time. “This is political theater and I am neither a politician or an actor. I don’t see a role for me as a lawyer,” said Alan Dershowitz, the Trump-allied attorney who joined Trump’s impeachment defense team last January. more...

The prophecies did not come true. And people are fuming about it.
By TINA NGUYEN and MARK SCOTT

The pardons went to Democrats, lobbyists and rappers, with nary a “patriot” among them. The mass arrests of Antifa campaigners never came. The inauguration stage at the Capitol, full of America’s most powerful politicians, was not purged of Satan-worshipping pedophiles under a shower of gunfire. Even the electricity stayed on. The moment the clock struck noon on Wednesday, Jan. 20, it was over — and the extreme factions of Trump’s diehard base were left reeling. Inauguration Day 2021 was supposed to be a culminating moment for the legion of online conspiracy theorists and extremists who have rallied around the now former president. But the lengthy list of prophecies they’d been told would eventually happen under Trump’s watch never came. In the days leading up to Trump’s departure from office, his online followers watched with horror as his pardons that were supposed to go to allies and supporters instead went to people who were inherently swampy: white-collar criminals convicted of tax fraud, family friends, Steve Bannon, even Democrat Kwame Kirkpatrick. more...

*** They need to convict Trump, if they give Trump, a pass the next Trump will be far worse because he knows there is no punishment for a president that commits crimes. ***

By American-Statesman Editorial Board

Imagine our nation’s future if President Donald Trump’s actions go unchallenged. Consider the precedents he will set. The losing candidate for president can spread wild conspiracy theories about a stolen election, even after recounts, court rulings and voting security experts have upheld the results. That candidate can tell supporters that the winner is illegitimate and must be stopped. That candidate can summon thousands to the nation’s capital and tell them, “If you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.” That candidate can order the crowd to march to the U.S. Capitol to stop the certification of election results — launching a deadly riot. We cannot undo the horrors of Jan. 6, the bloodshed and the beatings and the plumes of tear gas filling the halls of Congress. But we can hold the instigators accountable. We can insist on consequences that send a clear message: Attacks on our democracy — on the power of voters to choose their leaders — will not be tolerated. more...

Pelosi earlier said she’ll send impeachment article ‘soon,' which would trigger the start of the trial.
By BURGESS EVERETT, SARAH FERRIS and HEATHER CAYGLE

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is proposing to give former President Donald Trump two weeks to prepare his legal case for his impeachment trial, according to sources familiar with the matter. McConnell told Republican senators that he would propose to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer that the former president have until early-February to prepare his case, according to three people briefed on a conference call Thursday. The discussion of a two-week delay comes as congressional leaders attempt to work out details of Trump’s second impeachment trial, including the former president’s defense against the House’s charges that he incited the deadly insurrection at the Capitol earlier this month. more...

By Chris Isidore, CNN Business

New York (CNN Business) A growing number of businesses suddenly want very little to do with Donald Trump after he incited a mob to attack the Capitol. That could make it more difficult for the Trump Organization to do business after he leaves office. "I think it's a huge problem for him," said Michael D'Antonio, a CNN Contributor and a Trump biographer. "He created toxicity for an important part of his market. I don't know if some will ever come back. Most brands try to avoid controversy. I feel like he's forced the hands of the companies that decided to disengage." Since last week's siege of the US Capitol by Trump supporters, a growing list of banks and businesses have cut ties with him, citing violations of their rules against promoting violence — or concerns about associating their brands with Trump. Twitter and Facebook banned Trump indefinitely, taking away his biggest megaphones. Stripe is no longer processing credit card payments for his campaign, Shopify stopped operating online stores for the Trump Organization and the campaign and the PGA announced it is pulling a major golf tournament from one of his properties. more...

By Sophie Alexander, Bill Allison and Shahien Nasiripour

Donald Trump’s empire has been hit hard by coronavirus closures, with revenue from his Washington and Las Vegas hotels down by more than half. In his last financial disclosure form as president, Trump detailed the damage the pandemic has wrought, at a time when many tourism businesses are suffering from a lack of travelers. As president, the real-estate magnate resisted policies to slow the pandemic through mask-wearing, and insisted it remained safe for people to travel domestically. Revenue from the Trump hotel in Washington, which he had been trying to sell, fell to $15.1 million from $40.5 million a year earlier, according to the disclosure posted Wednesday. In Vegas, hotel-related sales were down to $9.2 million from $23.3 million. Another important property of Trump’s, the Doral Golf Resort in Miami, also saw revenues drop to $44 million from $77 million a year earlier. more...

Analysis: Donald Trump promised to end "American carnage" and "Make America Great Again." Four years later, he leaves with those goals far from reach.
By Jonathan Allen

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump did not build a wall or end American carnage or finish his term with a robust economy. His slogan was "Make America Great Again," but the lasting image of his term — rioters assaulting the U.S. Capitol and the country's republican form of governance, in his name — was anything but great. The failed coup — if it was organized enough to call it that — concluded a presidency that often used Orwellian tools of Newspeak and Doublethink to communicate. "This mob was fed lies," Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said Tuesday. "They were provoked by the president and other powerful people." Trump's lies, told up until the end in service of accumulating and maintaining power, were so conspicuous and dangerous that he was booted from the very social media sites that had built his base. Julian Zelizer, a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University, said Trump shook the foundations of the country over four years. more...

By Kevin D. Williamson

Goodbye to Donald J. Trump, the man who wanted to be Conrad Hilton but turned out to be Paris Hilton. Well, that sucked. Memo to MAGA and all its myriad fellow-travelers: Maybe Death of a Salesman as presented by Leni Riefenstahl just wasn’t the show Americans were dying to tune into this season. And, while we’re at it, maybe turning your party over to Generalissimo Walter Mitty, his hideous scheming spawn, and the studio audience from Hee-Haw was not just absolutely aces as a political strategy. Think on it, Cletus. I know this whole thing still sounds like your idea of a good time — how’s that working out for you? Let me refresh your memory: On the day Donald Trump was sworn in as president, Republicans controlled not only the White House but both houses of Congress. They were in a historically strong position elsewhere as well, controlling both legislative chambers in 32 states. They pissed that away like they were midnight drunks karaoke-warbling that old Chumbawumba song: In 2021, they control approximately squat. more...

Social media platforms, banks, law firms and even the country’s largest golf association all cut ties with former president
Chris Riotta

Donald Trump’s legal troubles began mounting before he could even step foot out of the White House on Wednesday. Reports indicated early in the morning on Inauguration Day that federal prosecutors in New York had obtained some of his financial records amid an investigation into the former president and his private business. Those records were obtained despite the Supreme Court having not yet made a decision on whether Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr can demand eight years of Mr Trump’s tax records from his accounting firm, Mazars USA. While the district attorney’s office was still waiting for an order from the nation’s highest court on its subpoena powers, Bloomberg News reported the new developments meant investigators can begin verifying criminal allegations against the Trump Organization and former president. By the afternoon, as President Joe Biden was officially sworn in as the next commander-in-chief, reports said Mr Trump’s team of tax lawyers were officially severing ties with him. A spokesperson for Morgan Lewis said the global law firm was ending its relationship with Mr Trump and his business, which predated his 2015 presidential bid, according to The American Lawyer. more...

By David Brennan

American allies and enemies are welcoming President-Elect Joe Biden's inauguration and bidding farewell to President Donald Trump, who on Wednesday will head to Florida and refuse to attend his successor's swearing-in ceremony in Washington, D.C. Adversaries and partners alike expect Biden to be more predictable than his predecessor, easier to work with and easier to read. Biden has promised to revive multilateralism and repair the damage done by Trump to traditional American alliances; welcome news in Canada and Europe who faced withering criticism from the outgoing administration. Germany was a favored Trump target, the president dismissing Europe's most powerful nation as "delinquent" on military spending, self-serving on trade, and his frosty relationship with Chancellor Angela Merkel is well documented. more...

"We thought Trump was a bad joke, but five years later we realized he jeopardized nothing less than the world's most powerful democracy," Spain's prime minister said.
By Henry Austin

LONDON — It was a sigh heard round the world. With almost palpable relief, longstanding American allies welcomed Joe Biden as he was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday. Some signaled hopes for a radical change in the White House, particularly in its approach to climate change and the coronavirus pandemic. And a few took parting shots at Donald Trump and his nationalist, "America first" agenda. The European Union's top politician, Ursula von der Leyen, said that "after four long years, Europe has a friend in the White House." "This time-honored ceremony on the steps of the U.S. Capitol will be a demonstration of the resilience of American democracy," she added in a speech in Brussels. Spain’s prime minister, Pedro Sanchez, meanwhile, said that Biden represented "victory of democracy over the ultra-right." Then he took aim directly at the former president. "Five years ago, we thought Trump was a bad joke, but five years later we realized he jeopardized nothing less than the world's most powerful democracy," he said in a speech. more...

By MATTHEW LEE

WASHINGTON (AP) — China imposed sanctions on nearly 30 former Trump administration officials moments after they left office on Wednesday. In a statement released just minutes after President Joe Biden was inaugurated, Beijing slapped travel bans and business restrictions on Trump’s secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, national security adviser Robert O’Brien and U.N. ambassador, Kelly Craft. Others covered by the sanctions include Trump’s economic adviser Peter Navarro; his top diplomat for Asia, David Stilwell; health and human services secretary, Alex Azar; along with former national security adviser John Bolton and strategist Stephen Bannon. The sanctions are largely symbolic but underscore Beijing’s antipathy toward a U.S. administration it regarded as hostile. more...

Learn more about Don the Con the real Donald J. Trump:  Find out more about the real Donald j. Trump and the Mueller investigation. Is Donald j. Trump a traitor? Was there collusion with the Russians? Did the trump campaign collude or conspire with Putin and the Russians? Trump is the king of fake news alternative facts. Donald Trump is a liar. Donald Trump is a racist. Find out more about trump the Mueller investigation Russia. Learn about don the con trump and Russia. Find out about the trump Russia Putin connection. Find out more about don the con, con man don and learn about the trump university, trump foundation, trump Russia, Russian collusion, money laundering, Trump the money launder and more…   
Is Donald J. Trump Is A Deadbeat? Is Donald J. Trump a traitor? Did the Trump campaign collude or conspire with Putin and the Russians? Donald J. Trump is the king of lies, fake news and alternative facts. Does Donald J. Trump lies about his lies. Doanld J. Trump is a con man, a crook, a fraud, a bully, a racist, a bad businessman, and a white supremacist. How many people will become sick or die from Trump’s changes to environmental rules and regulations? Donald J. Trump is making a profit on the American taxpayer dime. Donald J. Trump is the greatest threat to national security America has ever faced. Donald J. Trump is a threat to free press, free speech, free trade, the rule of law, human rights, human decency, our democracy, our air, our water, our lands and the American way of life. Donald J. Trump is a threat to America and we are dedicated to exposing Don the Con the real Donald J. Trump and shining a light on the threat Donald J. Trump is to Democracy, the America way of life and you. Find out more about Trump Impeachments
or the Trump Insurrection. The more you know the better informed you are. Find out for yourself how much of a threat Donald J. Trump is to America and you by clicking the links below and reading more.


Polls:  Your opinion matters take one of our free online polls. Free surveys, free polls, free trump polls, polls on trump. Take one of our free polls. Free polls, free on-line surveys Polls for trump polls for democrats polls for republicans. Dems polls and gop polls survey free online survey surveys survey junkie opinions opinion and more… Take a free trump poll. Find free online polls online trump polls online trump poll. Find donald trump polls, donald j trump polls. Polls for trump polls for democrats polls for republicans. Dems polls and gop polls survey free online survey surveys survey junkie opinions opinion and more…  
Your opinion matters take one of our free online polls:
Take one of our Polls
Take one of our Donald J. Trump Polls

Some of Donald J. Trump's Twitter Hashtags: A Small list of Donald J. Trump’s more infamous twitter hashtags #Trump, #TrumpTraitor, #TrumpIsATraitor, #TraitorTrump, #RemoveTrump, #TrumpIsAMole, #TrumpRussia, #TrumpRussianAsset, #TrumpPutin, #TrumpPutinsPunk, #DonTheCon, #LockHimUp, #TrumpFullofBs
See what people really think about Donald J. Trump.
Back to content