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"Seeking liberty and truth above suppression and mendacity!"
"Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech," said Benjamin Franklin.
Everyone has an opinion and the right to speak that opinion our forefathers granted us that right it's called the First Amendment. Read it then discuss it in the Forums. Find out about Donald J. Trump’s time in the white house. Donald J. Trump is a crook, a con man and liar who uses alternative facts and projects himself on to other.


Donald J. Trump Is A Bully, A Racist And A White Supremacist


Trump claims to be the least racist person in the world, but he also known a liar who lies about his lies so you cannot believe anything he says. If Trump mouth is open, it will probably be a lie. Over the years, repeatedly Trump has shown us he is a bully, a bigot, a racist and closet white supremacist. Therefore, whom are you going to believe Trump a known lair or the facts? Trump is a weak-minded bully who bullies people, but wines if somebody says something about him or says something he does like. Trump does not punch back, like a child he lashes out if somebody says bad about him or hurt feeling. Below you will find examples of Trump the bully, Trump the bigot, Trump’s racism and his white supremacist leaning.


By Shane Croucher
President Donald Trump appeared to mock Greta Thunberg after her emotional speech to the United Nations on Monday. Thunberg, 16, was tearful and her voice broke as she chided world leaders for having "stolen my dreams and my childhood" with their inaction on climate change. The Swedish activist founded the school strike campaign to raise awareness about the climate emergency and the urgent need for governments to take comprehensive action quickly. She has since traveled the world to campaign on climate change and recently sailed across the Atlantic to New York City so she could give this speech to the U.N. "She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!" Trump wrote on Twitter alongside a clip of Thunberg's speech. He tweeted after a video of Thunberg glaring at him as he entered the U.N. headquarters went viral on social media. Trump has questioned climate change science and sought to roll back environmental protections, as well as encouraged greater production in the fossil fuel industry. But climate scientists are near-unanimous in the view that humans are the driving force of the current changes to the climate and that time is almost out for us to halt it and reverse its effects. more...

New Trump-Pence campaign logo, seemingly borrowed from overt racists, is another in a long line of "coincidences"
By Amanda Marcotte
Oh boy, it's time for another round of Let's Pretend the President Isn't Air-Kissing White Nationalists. This time, the instigating incident is the discovery that a fan video tweeted by Donald Trump featured a logo — a lion's face built out of red stripes and blue stars — that was apparently, um, "borrowed" from a white supremacist group so unhinged that it managed to get banned from Twitter, a site that is always reluctant to boot fascists. Mediaite has a detailed account of the internet sleuths, including Brooke Binknowski of Snopes, who pieced together the apparent source of this lion logo. It has been used by the white supremacist site VDare, which also happens to be the same site whose articles the Department of Justice recently forwarded to immigration court employees, launching a minor scandal. The logo has been traced back to a pro-Trump fascist group called the "Lion Guard." The group's name, and apparent ethos comes from a quote from Benito Mussolini that Trump approvingly tweeted in 2016: "It is better to live one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep." Back then, Trump claimed it was an accident born of ignorance that he approvingly quoted Mussolini, just as the DOJ claims it was an unfortunate accident that it mailed out links to white supremacist sites. That's the strategy in play: Wink at the fascists, and whenever you get called out on it, play innocent. more... - Was it an accident or was it on purpose?

Trump has repeatedly claimed he’s “the least racist person.” His history suggests otherwise.
By German Lopez
If you ask President Donald Trump, he isn’t racist. To the contrary, he’s repeatedly said that he’s “the least racist person that you’ve ever encountered.” Trump’s actual record, however, tells a very different story. On the campaign trail, Trump repeatedly made explicitly racist and otherwise bigoted remarks, from calling Mexican immigrants criminals and rapists to proposing a ban on all Muslims entering the US to suggesting a judge should recuse himself from a case solely because of the judge’s Mexican heritage. The trend has continued into his presidency. From stereotyping a black reporter to pandering to white supremacists after they held a violent rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, to cracking a joke about the Trail of Tears, Trump hasn’t stopped with the racist acts after his 2016 election. Most recently, Trump tweeted that several black and brown members of Congress are “from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe” and that they should “go back” to those countries. The tweets, aimed at Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), exemplify a common racist trope used against immigrants and minority groups who criticize US policies. Democrats, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, condemned Trump’s tweets as racist. more...

By elizabeth thomas and abby cruz
In the days since the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, more 2020 candidates have started using the words "white supremacist" to describe not just some of President Donald Trump's supporters, but even the president himself. So far, at least seven Democratic presidential contenders have escalated their criticism of Trump and his racist rhetoric, calling him a "white supremacist" outright. Other candidates, have shied away from using the harsh label, but instead have said he enables and encourages white supremacy across the country, claiming he's using divisive language as a political strategy. more...

Posted By Tim Hains
Anti-Defamation League head Jonathan Greenblatt appeared on CNN Wednesday morning to respond to the president saying American Jews who vote for Democrats are disloyal to Israel and the president's Wednesday morning retweet of radio host Wayne Allen Root saying Trump is so beloved is Israel he is like "the King of Israel." "I will say that it is the height of hypocrisy to use Christian theology to bully jews and to push out some messianic complex," Greenblatt said about the retweet. "Literally, it's hard to think of something less kosher than telling the Jewish people you're the king of Israel, and therefore we should have some fidelity to you for that reason. I don't know if he's read the bible, but in the Old Testament, that's not what we believe." more...

Yes, Donald Trump is an anomaly — for America. In global terms, the bully-turned-autocrat is distressingly common
By Paul Rosenberg
I wasn’t surprised by Donald Trump’s rage-tweet attack on Reps. Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib, any more than I was surprised by the maturity and sobriety of their response. After all, Trump’s racism is legendary, and telling them to “go back where you came from” is not just textbook racism, it’s a schoolyard bully’s taunt. And a racist schoolyard bully is the sum and substance of what Trump is. In fact, one expert, physician and psychiatrist Dr. Frederick "Skip" Burkle, told me that autocratic leaders typically have histories of being bullies, and that that the most important thing about them that the public needs to understand. I first contacted Burkle by way of counselor and therapist Elizabeth Mika, whose chapter in “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump” (Salon review here) explained that "Tyrannies are three-legged beasts": the tyrant, his supporters and the society as a whole. That perspective is vital to understand our specific predicament, which is historically unique only within our national borders. The generic predicament of racism is nothing new — particularly for the Republican Party. (See “The Long Southern Strategy.” Salon author interview here.) What is new is Trump’s malignant psychology, a character disorder shared by dozens of destructive autocratic leaders whose patterns of murderous rule Burkle described in a 2015 paper, “Antisocial Personality Disorder and Pathological Narcissism in Prolonged Conflicts and Wars,” drawing on  decades of experience as a world  leader in emergency public health crises such as war and conflict, as well as his background in psychiatry and pediatrics. A recent follow-up paper (“Character Disorders,” for short), focused on the negative impact autocratic leaders have on health security, human rights and humanitarian care. more...

By Vanessa Williamson and Isabella Gelfand
The Brookings Cafeteria podcast last week discussed the role President Trump’s racist rhetoric has played in encouraging violence in America. Predictably, some podcast listeners responded skeptically on Twitter, doubting the association between Trump and hateful behavior. It would be naïve to think that data will change many individuals’ minds on this topic, but nonetheless, there is substantial evidence that Trump has encouraged racism and benefitted politically from it. First, Donald Trump’s support in the 2016 campaign was clearly driven by racism, sexism, and xenophobia. While
some observers have explained Trump’s success as a result of economic anxiety, the data demonstrate that anti-immigrant sentiment, racism, and sexism are much more strongly related to support for Trump. Trump’s much-discussed vote advantage with non-college-educated whites is misleading; when accounting for racism and sexism, the education gap among whites in the 2016 election returns to the typical levels of previous elections since 2000. Trump did not do especially well with non-college-educated whites, compared to other Republicans. He did especially well with white people who express sexist views about women and who deny racism exists. more...

He thinks "The Hunt" is racist. Elijah Cummings, too. That tells us a lot about the president's sinister worldview.
By Matt Ford
President Donald Trump’s Twitter feed is, among other things, a gift to historians. No major historical figure has provided so thorough a public, real-time account of their daily thoughts and feelings. Future generations of Americans will almost certainly look back on this era with horror and astonishment—and thanks to the president’s stream-of-consciousness social-media habits, they’ll have the raw material to understand how it happened. With these tweets on Friday, Trump was almost surely referring to The Hunt, a horror film in which wealthy foreigners hunt “deplorables” for sport. The movie was scheduled for release in late September, but Universal Pictures, which had already paused its marketing campaign after the twin mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, cancelled it amid the political backlash from conservatives. Trump’s tweets on Friday followed similar remarks to the press earlier in the day. “Hollywood is really terrible,” he said. “You talk about racist—Hollywood is racist. What they’re doing, with the kind of movies they’re putting out—it’s actually very dangerous for our country.” more...

His racism and intolerance have always been in evidence; only slowly did he begin to understand how to use them to his advantage.
By David A. Graham, Adrienne Green, Cullen Murphy, and Parker Richards
The first quotation from Donald Trump ever to appear in The New York Times came on October 16, 1973. Trump was responding to charges filed by the Justice Department alleging racial bias at his family’s real-estate company. “They are absolutely ridiculous,” Trump said of the charges. “We have never discriminated, and we never would.” In the years since then, Trump has assembled a long record of comment on issues involving African Americans as well as Mexicans, Hispanics more broadly, Native Americans, Muslims, Jews, immigrants, women, and people with disabilities. His statements have been reflected in his behavior—from public acts (placing ads calling for the execution of five young black and Latino men accused of rape, who were later shown to be innocent) to private preferences (“When Donald and Ivana came to the casino, the bosses would order all the black people off the floor,” a former employee of Trump’s Castle, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, told a writer for The New Yorker). Trump emerged as a political force owing to his full-throated embrace of “birtherism,” the false charge that the nation’s first black president, Barack Obama, was not born in the United States. His presidential campaign was fueled by nativist sentiment directed at nonwhite immigrants, and he proposed barring Muslims from entering the country. In 2016, Trump described himself to The Washington Post as “the least racist person that you’ve ever encountered.” more...

By Matthew J. Belvedere
Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden on Friday defended his ability to go head-to-head with President Donald Trump in the general election. Trump is “the bully I knew my whole life,” Biden told CNN in an interview. “He’s the bully I’ve always stood up to.” Biden was asked how Democratic voters can have confidence that he’s up to taking on Trump when he had trouble sparring in last week’s debate against party rivals. “I don’t think I’m having trouble sparring. It’s how you want to spar,” Biden said. “This is ironic. I’ve never been accused of not being able to spar. I’ve been accused of being too aggressive.” Biden said he would beat Trump by “pointing out who I am and who he is and what we’re for and what he’s against.” “This guy is the ‘divider-in-chief,’” said Biden, who added he will “fight without being personal” in this campaign. “I think the American public want a president with some dignity who has a value set who is actually trying to restore the soul of this country,” argued Biden, who remains the front-runner for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. However, Biden’s early wide lead has narrowed considerably since rival Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., called him out in the June 27 debate over issues of race, including busing and comments about working with segregationist senators earlier in his career. Biden said he did not rewatch the debate and he’s not worried about how he’s perceived: “People know who I am.” more...

He’ll insult them in public, then demand a deal behind closed doors. The meeting in Osaka is another test case of the president’s dealmaking skills.
By Robbie Gramer
With U.S. President Donald Trump taking part in his third G-20 summit this week in Osaka, Japan, the world has grown fairly used to his negotiating style. He’ll most likely publicly insult longstanding U.S. allies, then turn around and demand they play ball on his foreign-policy priorities behind closed doors. It’s an all-too-familiar habit—along with Trump’s full-on embrace of Russian President Vladimir Putin, with whom he shared a laugh on Friday about Russian meddling in U.S. elections. But two and a half years into his presidency, the bully boy approach hasn’t gotten Trump all that far. He did manage to orchestrate a successor deal to NAFTA—one that looked a lot like its predecessor—and extract some more defense money from NATO countries. With frequent insults and threats, Trump also pushed the Mexican government to do more to address immigration, including sending 6,000 troops from the Mexican National Guard to its own southern border to stem the flow of migrants from Central America. So far, however, there haven’t been a lot of other goodies—and some experts say any short-term gain from the strong-arming tactics can come at a long-term cost. Today, foreign leaders can brush off the insults. Tomorrow, they might be less willing to strike a deal—or even face domestic political pressure to avoid one, lest they be seen as folding to the demands of a president who is deeply unpopular abroad. “Trump feels this tactic tills the ground, puts foreign leaders more on edge, and puts him in a more dominant negotiating position,” said Nancy McEldowney, a former senior U.S. diplomat now at Georgetown University. “But what he’s also done is creating a lot irritation between allies.” more...

By Rebecca Morin, USA TODAY
WASHINGTON – Rep. Rashida Tlaib on Tuesday called President Donald Trump the "biggest bully" the congresswoman has faced in her life after he tweeted recently that she and three other Democratic congresswomen of color should "go back" to their countries. Tlaib, D-Mich, explained that was her first thought when she saw Trump's tweets, according to an interview with "CBS This Morning," that featured all four members of "The Squad," which also includes Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. "I'm dealing with the biggest bully I've ever had to deal with in my lifetime and trying to push back on that, and trying to do the job that we all have been sent here to do, which is centered around the people at home," Tlaib, who is Palestinian American, said. Three of the four freshmen lawmakers were born in the United States. Omar immigrated to the U.S. over 20 years ago from Somalia and is a naturalized citizen. Tlaib and Omar are the only two Muslim women in the House of Representatives. The interview with "The Squad" came before the House voted to condemn Trump's tweets as racist. The House passed the resolution 240-187. Over the weekend, Trump lashed out at the four Democratic congresswomen saying they should "go back" to fix the countries they "originally came from." He doubled down on his remarks several times since and denies that his repeated comments and attacks are racist. The Squad, however, on Monday afternoon held a press conference and denounced Trump's comments as "racist," "xenophobic," and "bigoted." During the CBS interview, Tlaib once again said Trump's remarks are a "distraction." Leading House Republicans have distanced themselves from Trump's comments, but did not go as far as labeling them as racist. more...

By Michael D'Antonio
(CNN) - In the umpteenth scandalous moment of his reign, the President tweeted that four Congresswomen -- three homegrown Americans and one who became a citizen of the United States at age 17 -- should "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." The racism in this attack is appalling, but it is not the only form of deviance on display. That would be the suggestion, which he later amplified, that Donald Trump has anointed himself the judge of who belongs in America and who does not. This should strike fear in every heart because it means that the most powerful person in the country -- with a large cohort of supporters ready to follow him anywhere -- has begun to sort and separate us from each other. In this moment he finds these four elected public servants unacceptable, but who's to say what he'll think about any of us tomorrow, should we dare to disagree with or challenge him? This is a serious question, with terrifying implications, that voters need to examine before they cast their vote in the 2020 election. Consider that as social beings who depend on our families, our communities, and yes, our country for our identity and well-being, few things are more upsetting than the prospect of being rejected and cast out. Shunning is so painful that most of us will go to great lengths to avoid it. Religious groups that use the threat of excommunication to keep people in line -- "in the fold" --understand this powerful dynamic and so do bullies who make a show of victimizing one kid in order to dominate everyone on the playground. As they make an example out of a target -- a kid whose pain is quite obvious to other kids -- schoolyard bullies can dominate everyone else in the schoolyard. If you didn't witness this as a youngster, you can consult many studies that confirm the process. Later in life, bullies may use this tactic as bosses in a workplace or as coaches of teams (think Bobby Knight) or in politics. These bullies instill in others the fear of being fired, cut from a team, or defeated in an election. In this way they gain control. more...

Some may say Trump's actions on Twitter are akin to cyberbullying. Donna Clark Love, a bullying expert, weighed in: “The people who tend to be bullies, online and in person, have an average or higher self-esteem than the one being bullied." Here are some of the most memorable incidents of Trump’s bullying, ranked from least to most offensive. more...

By Grace Panetta
Anthony Scaramucci, the former short-lived White House communications director, blasted President Donald Trump as a "very weak troll" and "a bully" as their public feud continues to escalate. After Trump attacked Scaramucci as having "nothing to do with my election victory" and claiming he "just wanted to be on TV," Scaramucci tweeted at Trump, "you're losing your fastball,' and added, "Time to call in a good relief pitcher. @potus is lost." The online brawl between the two began when Scaramucci, who famously served just 11 days in the summer of 2017 before being fired, criticized the president's response to mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio in a Thursday appearance on MSNBC's "Hardball" with Chris Matthews. more...

by Martin Longman
On one level, I understand the support evangelical Christians extend to Donald Trump. Many of the explanations provided to Washington Post reporter Julie Zauzmer appear legitimate so long as I’m willing to grant legitimacy to opinions and beliefs that strike me as reactionary and anti-scientific. I get that some people who see marriage as a sacred institution have trouble accepting same-sex marriage and don’t want to see the White House lit up in rainbow colors. I can empathize with business owners who want to be able to deny service to anyone for any reason. I understand that people want to protect their ability to impart their values to their children without government interference or widespread social or political condemnation. I can see why they saw the Obama administration as a threat and why they see Trump as a defender. But I am not sure that these things really get to the heart of Trump’s standing with evangelicals. Trump ran stronger with conservative Christians than either John McCain or Mitt Romney, and I can see a partial explanation for that. McCain famously denounced the Christian Right back in 2000 after his failed primary bid for president. Romney comes from a rival proselytizing faith. Trump isn’t an evangelical so he’s not a true member of the team, but at least he’s not an enemy or a competitor. Yet, why did he do better that George W. Bush, who actually was a member of the team? Trump is transparently a fraud, and this very much includes his ludicrous professions of personal faith. His relationship with evangelicals in completely cynical and transactional and many right-wing Christians are aware of the true nature of this arrangement. They used to tell us it was important to them that Dubya restored dignity to the office of the presidency, but although they continually profess personal discomfort with Trump’s personal morals and much of his behavior, they say they’ll take the bad in order to get the good. What I suspect is that Trump’s popularity with the Christian Right is actually tied to his behavior, and his policies are comparatively less important. more...

After the massacre, Trump visited Ohio victims and then criticized the mayor and Sen. Sherrod Brown as “very dishonest” and “misrepresenting” his visit.
By Sarah Ruiz-Grossman
Days after a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, the city’s Democratic mayor, Nan Whaley, called President Donald Trump a “bully and a coward” after he came after her and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) for supposedly “misrepresenting” his visit to shooting victims in a hospital. In an interview on CNN late Wednesday, Whaley was asked her response to the president reportedly calling her and Brown “very dishonest people” after his visit. “I’ve watched President Trump’s Twitter feed for a while. He’s a bully and a coward,” the mayor said. “And it’s fine that he wants to bully me and Sen. Brown. We’re OK. We can take it. But the citizens of Dayton deserve action.” Over the weekend, two horrific mass shootings occurred within 24 hours in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton. In Dayton, the shooter left nine people dead and injured over two dozen others. Trump tweeted earlier Wednesday that Whaley and Brown were “totally misrepresenting” his hospital visit at a news conference they gave. At that news conference, however, Whaley had said the victims and first responders were “grateful” for Trump’s visit. She also called the president’s past rhetoric “divisive.” At a stop in El Paso the same day, Trump also told reporters that Whaley and Brown were “very dishonest” and said: “I get on Air Force One where they do have a lot of televisions. I turn on the television and there they are saying, ‘Well, I don’t know if it was appropriate for the president to be here.’” Whaley told CNN later she “really [didn’t] understand... at all” Trump’s comments on her and Brown. more...

New Jersey casino regulators have fined the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino $200,000 for catering to a high-roller by transferring black and female dealers from his table. The Casino Control Commission approved the penalty Wednesday by a 3-1 vote. The fine was twice the amount recommended by the commission's vice chairman but far less than the $900,000 sought by the state Division of Gaming Enforcement. more...   

Donald J. Trump assumed an increasingly prominent role in the business, the company’s practice of turning away potential black tenants was painstakingly documented by activists and organizations that viewed equal housing as the next frontier in the civil rights struggle. The Justice Department undertook its own investigation and, in 1973, sued Trump Management for discriminating against blacks. Both Fred Trump, the company’s chairman, and Donald Trump, its president, were named as defendants. It was front-page news, and for Donald, amounted to his debut in the public eye. more...

The FBI has released nearly 400 pages of records on an investigation the bureau conducted in the 1970s into alleged racial discrimination in the rental of apartments from President Donald Trump's real estate company.
The files detail dozens of interviews the bureau conducted with Trump building tenants, management and employees, seeking indications that minority tenants were steered away from housing complexes. Most of those interviewed said they were not aware of any discrimination. However, some of the records recount the stories of black rental applicants who said they were told no apartments were available, while whites sent to check on the same apartments were offered leases. The records, posted on the FBI's Freedom of Information Act website, include a 1974 interview with a former doorman at a Trump building in Brooklyn. more...

Looking for more information on Donald J. Trump (aka Don the Con, aka Don the Snake, aka Two face Donnie, aka The Don, aka Criminal Don). Here you can find information on lawsuits against Trump, Trump’s time is the white house, Trump Administration scandals and corruption, Trump before the white house, Trump Impeachment Inquiry, Trump Russia Affair, Trump-Ukraine Affair, how Trump runs his properties and more. Find out if Trump is filling his pockets with foreign money and your tax dollars. Find out if Trump is a good a businessman or a bad businessman and how viral, nasty and disgusting Trump properties are. Find out if Trump is a crook and/or a conman. Find out if Trump lies about his lies and more. The more you know the better informed you will be to make your own determination on the real Donald J. Trump (aka Don the Con, aka Don the Snake, aka Two face Donnie, aka The Don, aka Criminal Don). Find out all you can about Donald J. Trump, for some you may find he is not the man you thought he was, for others you may be proven right, for others you may find he is far worse than you thought he was.

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