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"Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech," said Benjamin Franklin.
Everyone has an opinion and the right to speak that opinion our forefathers granted us that right it's called the First Amendment. Read it then discuss it in the Forums. Find out about Donald J. Trump’s time in the white house. Donald J. Trump is a crook, a con man and liar who uses alternative facts and projects himself on to other.

Donald J. Trump Is A Bully, A Racist And A White Supremacist
Trump claims to be the least racist person in the world, he is not the least racist person but he is the most racist person in the world. He is a known a liar who lies about his lies so you cannot believe anything he says. If Trump mouth is open, it will probably be a lie. Over the years, repeatedly Trump has shown us he is trifling; he is a bully, a bigot, a racist and a white supremacist. Therefore, whom are you going to believe Trump a known lair or the facts? Trump is a trifling weak-minded bully who bullies people, but wines if somebody says something about him or says something he does like. Trump does not punch back, like a child he lashes out if somebody says something bad about him or hurt feeling. Below you will find examples of how petty Trump is that he is a bully, a bigot, a racist and a white supremacist.

Analysis by Maeve Reston, CNN

(CNN) As the country mourned civil rights icon John Lewis, President Donald Trump spent the weekend conjuring scary images of "who knows" invading the suburbs, trying to appeal to his White supporters in his latest attempt to lead the nation backward instead of embracing the march to racial justice that Lewis championed. Trump's rhetoric -- so discordant with where many Americans are headed on issues of race -- was a reminder that despite mass demonstrations in cities across America and signs of change within big corporations to show that Black lives matter, there have been very few tangible signs of progress on civil rights at the federal level since the death of George Floyd, who was killed by a Minneapolis police officer on Memorial Day. The kinds of policies that Lewis fought for during his 33 years in Congress — voting rights, desegregation in housing and efforts to curb the disproportionate use of police brutality against Black Americans — have run headlong into the intransigence of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and the President's refusal to lead on issues of racial justice. As Americans remember Lewis, who repeatedly risked his life in the name of progress on racism and prejudice, they also face a choice — to stand by passively and allow this moment of cultural change to evaporate or to demand action from their leaders, who risk a rebuke at the polls in November.

By Bruce Haring

NASCAR’s Cup Series All-Star Race was not a good one for Bubba Wallace. Appearing at a qualifier held on Wednesday in Bristol, Tennessee, Wallace was booed, then crashed into a wall. It was the first time a significant number of fans were present at a NASCAR race since the Confederate flag was banned. Several thousand fans were on hand – and so was the flag. Jenna Fryer, the Associated Press auto racing reporter, tweeted that many Confederate flags were sighted in and around the Bristol Motor Speedway. “FWIW, in addition to Confederate flag flying over Bristol there was another hanging off a balcony of a condo across from the main entrance as well as others along Speedway Blvd. Spoke to fan @Matt2Harrison and he said he say many flags on shirts and other items in stands.” Fryer also reported that Wallace, NASCAR’s only top tier African American driver and prominently in the news when reports surfaced of a noose found in his garage at another track, was booed when he was introduced and had fans cheer when he crashed. “Bubba Wallace was also booed when he was introduced, and many cheered when he crashed. NASCAR still has a lot of work to do to back up its position. The group Justice 4 Diversity held signs along Speedway Blvd. after the race.”

Kevin Breuninger

President Donald Trump lashed out Monday at the NASCAR Cup series’ only Black driver and ripped its ban on the Confederate battle flag. Trump asked in a tweet if 26-year-old Bubba Wallace has “apologized to all of those great NASCAR drivers & officials who came to his aid, stood by his side, & were willing to sacrifice everything for him, only to find out that the whole thing was just another HOAX?” Trump was referring to findings that what appeared to have been a noose found in Wallace’s garage recently was a pull rope and not meant to intimidate the driver. It was not ruled a hoax, as the president claims. “That & Flag decision has caused lowest ratings EVER!” the president added in a reference to NASCAR’s move last month to prohibit displaying the Confederate battle flag. Contrary to Trump’s tweet, NASCAR’s ratings have actually increased from previous years, according to Speed Report. The flag has been commonly displayed at NASCAR races for decades. NASCAR in 2015 had asked that fans not fly the flag following the slaughter in Charleston, South Carolina, of nine Black churchgoers by racist Dylan Roof, but many fans had ignored that request.

The growing pattern comes as Trump drops in national polls.
By Terrance Smith and Will Steakin

Amid historic nationwide protests calling for racial justice, President Donald Trump retweeted a video last Sunday showing a supporter yelling "white power!" Then, more than three hours and thousands of views later, the tweet was deleted and the White House issued a statement claiming the president "did not hear" what the supporter could clearly be heard saying. As startling as it was, it was only the latest instance of the president using his vast social media presence to magnify racist messaging to a segment of his political base, ahead of the November election. One critic says it's part of a growing pattern on the part of Trump, his campaign and allies to push racially inflammatory language and then, after widespread outrage, claim ignorance. Leah Wright Rigueur, professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and author of "The Loneliness of the Black Republican," calls that pattern "convenient." "If it was actual ignorance, we wouldn't see this happening repeatedly and we also wouldn't see the same kind of targeted type of retweets, tweeting commentary, etc. So, it just seems like a very convenient shield as defense to use, when once again they find themselves in the position that they're often in," Rigueur told ABC News.

Analysis by Maeve Reston, CNN

(CNN) On a very different Fourth of July holiday, when many Americans are wrestling with the racist misdeeds of the country's heroes and confronting an unrelenting pandemic with surging cases, their commander-in-chief is attempting to drag America backward -- stirring fear of cultural change while flouting the most basic scientific evidence about disease transmission. In a jaw-dropping speech that amounted to a culture war bonfire, President Donald Trump used the backdrop of Mount Rushmore Friday night to frame protesters as a nefarious left-wing mob that intends to "end America." Those opponents, he argued, are engaged in a "merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children." On Saturday in the nation's capital, the Trump administration has planned July 4 celebrations that ignore Washington, DC, Muriel Bowser's concerns about public health guidelines, although at least there'll be some of the social distancing measures at the White House that were ignored in South Dakota, where the President largely acted as if the coronavirus didn't exist. Instead, when Trump spoke on Friday night of a "growing danger," he was talking about an entirely different threat than rising coronavirus cases. He referred to a threat to America's "heritage" -- rhetoric intended to rev up his base at a time when many Americans are attempting to relearn the nation's history with greater attention to the wrongs inflicted on Black and Native American people.

His racism and intolerance have always been in evidence; only slowly did he begin to understand how to use them to his advantage.
Story by David A. Graham, Adrienne Green, Cullen Murphy, and Parker Richards

The first quotation from Donald Trump ever to appear in The New York Times came on October 16, 1973. Trump was responding to charges filed by the Justice Department alleging racial bias at his family’s real-estate company. “They are absolutely ridiculous,” Trump said of the charges. “We have never discriminated, and we never would.” In the years since then, Trump has assembled a long record of comment on issues involving African Americans as well as Mexicans, Hispanics more broadly, Native Americans, Muslims, Jews, immigrants, women, and people with disabilities. His statements have been reflected in his behavior—from public acts (placing ads calling for the execution of five young black and Latino men accused of rape, who were later shown to be innocent) to private preferences (“When Donald and Ivana came to the casino, the bosses would order all the black people off the floor,” a former employee of Trump’s Castle, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, told a writer for The New Yorker). Trump emerged as a political force owing to his full-throated embrace of “birtherism,” the false charge that the nation’s first black president, Barack Obama, was not born in the United States. His presidential campaign was fueled by nativist sentiment directed at nonwhite immigrants, and he proposed barring Muslims from entering the country. In 2016, Trump described himself to The Washington Post as “the least racist person that you’ve ever encountered.”

Desperate to distract from the coronavirus catastrophe, Trump and his media allies are going full-on rabid racism
Amanda Marcotte

Racism is all he's got. Everything else Donald Trump was going to run on this summer and fall has evaporated. The "booming" economy? (Which he inherited from Barack Obama in the first place.) The U.S. has the worst unemployment rate since the Great Depression and the situation is about to get exponentially worse as unemployment benefits expire. And no, "reopening" is not a solution, since the data makes clear that consumers have little interest in shopping or eating out during a pandemic. And then there was Trump's plan to hold big rallies to make himself look like he's got momentum, while Joe Biden campaigns in responsible ways that don't spread the coronavirus Not only was that plan sociopathic, it's also not working. Trump's big comeback rally in Tulsa was a hilarious failure, with only a third of the arena filled. Now Trump has canceled a rally in Alabama, citing coronavirus fears. It's just as likely that the campaign was scared of more empty seats — even some of his most ardent followers would rather root for him at home rather than risk getting sick.

Trump's efforts to paint Biden as too old and out of it to do a job as difficult as being president? Well, in the face of reports that Trump did nothing to push back against Russia paying Afghan fighters to kill American soldiers, the only "defense" of Trump is that he's either too lazy or too illiterate to pay attention to his intelligence briefings. For a 74-year-old man trying to argue he's sharper than his slightly older opponent, having his press secretary argue that Trump does too know how to read is arguably not a great look. As for the coronavirus itself, Trump is so hostile to any efforts to meaningfully fight the disease that people have started to wonder, only half-facetiously, whether he's campaigning on a pro-coronavirus agenda.

By Kevin Liptak and Kristen Holmes, CNN

(CNN) On Monday, President Donald Trump went after attempts to strip the names of racists from buildings. On Tuesday, it was a federal housing rule meant to combat racial segregation. By Wednesday, Trump was calling the words "black lives matter" a "symbol of hate" -- a description he's refused to use for Confederate emblems -- that would spoil the "luxury avenue" he once called home. Navigating a precarious political moment, Trump continues seizing upon widening cultural divisions in a way he believes will appeal to voters concerned about safety and order -- despite polls showing wide disapproval of how he's handling race relations. As he distributes wanted posters of suspected vandals on his Twitter feed and warns those who splashed red paint on statues of George Washington to turn themselves in, Trump is also stoking racial tensions using language and tropes that harken to the days of segregationist politics and fears of ruined neighborhoods. The effort has been waged mostly on Trump's Twitter page, which over the weekend featured a video of a supporter in Florida chanting "White power." Trump later removed it, though he left up a video of two White homeowners in St. Louis protecting their stone mansion with firearms as a Black Lives Matter march went past. * The confederate monuments and statues Trump wants to protect are the symbols of hate and traitors.

'I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility,' late actor said in 1971 interview
By John T Bennett - Washington Bureau Chief

Donald Trump is accusing some Democratic officials of "incredible stupidity" for calling for actor John Wayne's name to be removed from an airport in California even after an interview resurfaced of "The Duke" embracing white supremacy. John Wayne Airport in southern California serves Orange County and Los Angeles. Mr Trump in January 2016, as a presidential candidate, held a special event at the John Wayne Birthplace Museum in Winterset, Iowa. He spoke at a lectern with a wax statue of the late actor behind him. After being introduced by Wayne's daughter, the GOP candidate called himself a "longtime fan" of the star of many hit Western films. "We love John Wayne," Mr Trump said that day. "We love John Wayne and we love his family equally, right? Equally." But amid ongoing protests and other social changes following the death of George Floyd, a black man, under the knee of a white police officer in Minneapolis, Mr Trump's full embrace of Wayne could give him yet another political headache. That's because of a 1971 interview the actor conducted with Playboy magazine. "With a lot of blacks, there's quite a bit of resentment along with their dissent, and possibly rightfully so. But we can't all of a sudden get down on our knees and turn everything over to the leadership of the blacks," Mr Wayne said. "I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility. I don't believe in giving authority and positions of leadership and judgment to irresponsible people." "I don't feel guilty about the fact that five or 10 generations ago these people were slaves. Now, I'm not condoning slavery. It's just a fact of life, like the kid who gets infantile paralysis and has to wear braces so he can't play football with the rest of us," he added. "I will say this, though: I think any black who can compete with a white today can get a better break than a white man. I wish they'd tell me where in the world they have it better than right here in America."

The ball’s ‘nostalgic’ design is less controversial than its price tag, which echoes a code used by neo-Nazis everywhere
By Andrew Naughtie

Donald Trump’s umbrella company, The Trump Organisation, is being hectored and denounced on social media for selling a “nostalgic” baseball for $88 – an unusual price tag that uses a number often referenced on the far right to signal sympathy with Adolf Hitler. The awkward attention to the ball’s price tag comes just after the president retweeted a video in which an elderly white man in Florida riding a golf cart shouts “white power” at anti-racism protesters. Mr Trump originally captioned his retweet “Thank you to the great people of The Villages,” but has since deleted it. In white supremacist and neo-Nazi circles, the number 88 serves as a code for the letters “HH” – an abbreviation of “heil Hitler”. The number 18 sometimes stands in for Hitler’s initials, while the number 14 refers to a widely known 14-word shibboleth: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”. The numbers are sometimes combined into 1488.

Clip shows man and woman pointing weapons at people staging protest against US city’s mayor
By Martin Pengelly in New York and agencies

Donald Trump courted controversy on Monday – and perhaps sought to deflect attention from reports about Russia placing bounties on US soldiers in Afghanistan – by retweeting news footage of a white couple in St Louis, Missouri, who pointed guns at protesters marching for police reform. The president’s action came a day after he retweeted footage of protesters clashing in Florida in which a Trump supporter could be heard to say: “White power! White power!” That retweet was deleted from the president’s account after a few hours, a White House spokesman saying Trump had not heard the inflammatory words before sending the footage on to his supporters. The protesters in St Louis were marching to the mayor’s home to demand her resignation.

Face the Nation
The Republican senator from South Carolina said the president should take down a tweet showing a video of clashing protesters in Florida.

By Veronica Stracqualursi and Sarah Westwood, CNN

(CNN) President Donald Trump on Sunday morning widely shared a video he said is from the Villages, a retirement community in Florida, in which a man driving a golf cart with Trump campaign posters is seen chanting "white power." The President retweeted the video that showed the community's Trump supporters and anti-Trump protesters arguing with one another. The President thanked the "great people" shown in the video. "Thank you to the great people of The Villages. The Radical Left Do Nothing Democrats will Fall in the Fall. Corrupt Joe is shot. See you soon!!" he wrote in the tweet. Roughly three hours later, the tweet no longer appeared in Trump's timeline. "President Trump is a big fan of the Villages. He did not hear the one statement made on the video. What he did see was tremendous enthusiasm from his many supporters," White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere said in a statement.

By Jeong-Ho Lee, Nick Wadhams and Jennifer Jacobs / Bloomberg

A large “Black Lives Matter” banner draped on the front of the U.S. embassy in Seoul was removed on Monday after it was brought to the attention of President Donald Trump and Secretary of State Michael Pompeo, according to people familiar with the matter. Pompeo and Trump were both displeased about the banner, the people said. A large, multicolored Pride”banner recognizing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people was also removed on Monday. They were replaced with a banner commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Korean War. The embassy unfurled the “Black Lives Matter” banner on its mission building on Saturday to support worldwide anti-racism protests that have followed the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody last month. - Trump America’s racist president

By James Walker

A senior adviser to Mike Bloomberg hit out at Donald Trump Jr. on Tuesday, listing examples of his father's "racism and bigotry" after the president's eldest son shared a clip of the former New York City mayor defending his controversial "stop and frisk" policing strategy. In a thread posted on Twitter yesterday afternoon, Tim O'Brien described President Donald Trump as a "flagrantly hateful racist" and said his boss Bloomberg was not "in the same category" as the commander-in-chief. He went on to list examples of Trump being "racist" to people of color on Capitol Hill and elsewhere in the world, both before and during his presidency. The senior adviser's criticism of the president came shortly after a 2015 clip of Bloomberg defending stop and frisk and putting "all the cops" in minority neighborhoods surfaced on social media, causing the hashtag #BloombergIsRacist to trend. A copy of the Democratic presidential candidate's Aspen Institute speech shared by podcaster Benjamin Dixon has picked up more than seven million views so far. In the clip of his speech, Bloomberg is heard saying: "Ninty-five percent of your murders and murderers and murder victims fit one M.O. You can just take the description, Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops. They are male minorities, 15 to 25." He also said: "One of the unintended consequences is people say, 'Oh my god, you are arresting kids for marijuana, they're all minorities.' Yes, that's true, why? Because we put all the cops in the minority neighborhoods. Yes, that's true. "Why did we do it? Because that's where all the crime is. And the first thing you can do for people is to stop them getting killed." After the audio resurfaced, the president's eldest son tweeted a clip of the talk with the hashtag #BloombergIsARacist. Responding to the post, O'Brien tweeted: "Your father is the most overt and flagrantly hateful racist and bigot of the modern presidency and nothing—absolutely nothing—in Mike Bloomberg's background puts him in the same category as your dad." He went on to list several allegations and examples of President Trump's past racism including his support of the birtherism conspiracy theory that wrongly suggested former President Barack Obama was not born in the United States.

Analysis by Brandon Tensley, CNN

Washington (CNN)As on so many other occasions during his presidency, President Donald Trump on Tuesday night showed that he's ever the showman, having used part of his third official State of the Union address to ostensibly pander to black voters as he vies for another term in the White House. And as before, one thing seemed especially clear: The President would rather perform support for black Americans than actually champion them. There were the predictable talking points, such as Trump's crowing about low black unemployment rates under his leadership -- "African American poverty has declined to the lowest rate ever recorded," he said -- despite the fact that he inherited an already OK economy that's still just OK. Indeed, black unemployment has hit all-time lows while Trump has been in office. In August, the unemployment rate for black workers fell to 5.5% from 6%, according to the Labor Department data. The previous record low of 5.9% was set in May 2018. Yet maybe more jarring than Trump's words alone was the sheer spectacle of it all. As the President celebrated some of his avowed accomplishments, he also chose to spotlight black Americans in a manner that felt designed to soothe white supporters who might be uncomfortable with his discriminatory track record and rhetoric. Trump's polling with black Americans is dismal -- a recent Washington Post/Ipsos poll showed 8-in-10 black voters said the President is racist. Maybe he's trying to turn that number around. But he also might be trying to give the 53% of white women who voted for him in 2016 reasons to justify voting for him again in 2020, despite his high-profile antagonism of prominent politicians of color, such as Reps. John Lewis and Elijah Cummings, and his denigration of cities such as Baltimore as "rat-infested." Trump pivoted from touting the creation of the Space Force -- the youngest branch of the American military -- to praising 13-year-old Iain Lanphier ("one of the Space Force's youngest potential recruits") and his 100-year-old great-grandfather, Charles McGee, who happens to be one of the few surviving Tuskegee Airmen, the famed group of black military pilots during World War II.

By Zachary Cohen and Kevin Bohn, CNN

(CNN) - A new biography of former Defense Secretary James Mattis reports President Donald Trump personally got involved in who would win a major $10 billion contract to provide cloud computing services to the Pentagon, according to the website Task & Purpose, which writes about military issues. That hotly contested contract was awarded to Microsoft on Friday evening over Amazon in a months-long battle. Task & Purpose reports the new book, "Holding The Line: Inside Trump's Pentagon with Secretary Mattis" by former Mattis speechwriter and communications director Guy Snodgrass recounts that Mattis always tried to translate Trump's demands into ethical outcomes. According to Snodgrass' book, Trump called Mattis during summer 2018 and directed him to "screw Amazon" out of the opportunity to bid on the contract. Task & Purpose obtained an advanced copy of the book. CNN has not yet seen the book. For several years Trump has voiced his displeasure with Amazon and Jeff Bezos, who also owns The Washington Post. He has accused Amazon of taking advantage of the Postal Service although independent investigations have disagreed with that contention. He also has linked his unfavorable view of Washington Post reporting to Amazon although the Post makes clear it is run separately. "Relaying the story to us during Small Group, Mattis said, 'We're not going to do that. This will be done by the book, both legally and ethically,'" Snodgrass wrote according to Task & Purpose. The White House did not immediately respond to a CNN request for comment. more... - Jeff Bezos must have hurt the little baby’s feelings. Trump is the pettiest person in the world and as Americans; we should be ashamed to have him as our president.

By Julia Arciga

The White House is reportedly planning to instruct federal agencies not to renew their subscriptions to The New York Times and The Washington Post. “Not renewing subscriptions across all federal agencies will be a significant cost saving—hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars will be saved,” White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham told The Wall Street Journal. It’s not clear how many subscriptions the federal government has to each newspaper, or how the White House would direct agencies to cut the subscriptions. The Post and the Times declined to comment. On Monday evening, Trump told Fox News’ Sean Hannity that he doesn’t want the Post or the Times to be in the White House. “We’re going to probably terminate that and The Washington Post. They’re fake,” he said. Aides told the Journal that they expect Trump will read both newspapers despite the move. more... - Oh, they must have hurt the little baby’s feelings. Trump is the pettiest person in the world and as Americans; we should be ashamed to have him as our president.

By James Walker

President Donald Trump did not attend the funeral of Elijah Cummings today after the Democrat congressman died in office last week aged 68. A copy of the president's schedule released to the press this morning shows that Trump had nothing planned until 11:40 a.m. when he was due to leave the White House for Joint Base Andrews in Maryland and take a flight to South Carolina. President Trump has also not been pictured in a livestream of Cummings' Baltimore funeral that was available on C-Span from 10 a.m. ET. Newsweek has contacted the White House asking why Trump was not in attendance at the funeral or at the previous day's lying-in-state ceremony for Cummings at the Capitol, but did not receive a response by time of publication. The news of Elijah Cummings' death as a result of complications around "longstanding health challenges" was announced by his office on Thursday, October 17. He had been away from work since September after going for a medical procedure, after which his office said he would be out of his office for a week. Rep. Cummings of Maryland had a fractious relationship with President Trump in his role as chairman of the Oversight and Reform Committee—a post that put him at the center of the impeachment inquiry and other investigations into the commander-in-chief. He also took Trump to task over the treatment of migrant children near the U.S.-Mexico border, a challenge that led to Trump facing accusations of racism after he dismissed Cummings' district as "rat infested." The representative of Maryland's 7th congressional district offered to show Trump around the area in response to the president's remarks. When news broke of Cummings' death, Trump tweeted an offer of condolences to his family and friends, saying: "My warmest condolences to the family and many friends of Congressman Elijah Cummings. I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader. His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!" Although the sitting president has decided not to attend Cummings' funeral today, former Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton were in attendance, along with 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former first lady Michelle Obama. Both the Clintons and former President Obama were set to deliver eulogies at the funeral where House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was also due to address mourners. Newsweek asked representatives of former Presidents George W. Bush and Jimmy Carter if they would be in attendance at Cummings' Baltimore funeral today, but had not received a response by time of publication. President Trump's snub of the Maryland representative's Baltimore funeral comes after he also failed to attend the Democrat's lying-in-state ceremony at the Capitol on Thursday. more... - Trump is so petty that he skipped Elijah Cummings funeral and capitol memorial service. Trump is not a man he is a child.

By Shane Croucher

President Donald Trump appeared to mock Greta Thunberg after her emotional speech to the United Nations on Monday. Thunberg, 16, was tearful and her voice broke as she chided world leaders for having "stolen my dreams and my childhood" with their inaction on climate change. The Swedish activist founded the school strike campaign to raise awareness about the climate emergency and the urgent need for governments to take comprehensive action quickly. She has since traveled the world to campaign on climate change and recently sailed across the Atlantic to New York City so she could give this speech to the U.N. "She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!" Trump wrote on Twitter alongside a clip of Thunberg's speech. He tweeted after a video of Thunberg glaring at him as he entered the U.N. headquarters went viral on social media. Trump has questioned climate change science and sought to roll back environmental protections, as well as encouraged greater production in the fossil fuel industry. But climate scientists are near-unanimous in the view that humans are the driving force of the current changes to the climate and that time is almost out for us to halt it and reverse its effects. more...

New Trump-Pence campaign logo, seemingly borrowed from overt racists, is another in a long line of "coincidences"
By Amanda Marcotte

Oh boy, it's time for another round of Let's Pretend the President Isn't Air-Kissing White Nationalists. This time, the instigating incident is the discovery that a fan video tweeted by Donald Trump featured a logo — a lion's face built out of red stripes and blue stars — that was apparently, um, "borrowed" from a white supremacist group so unhinged that it managed to get banned from Twitter, a site that is always reluctant to boot fascists. Mediaite has a detailed account of the internet sleuths, including Brooke Binknowski of Snopes, who pieced together the apparent source of this lion logo. It has been used by the white supremacist site VDare, which also happens to be the same site whose articles the Department of Justice recently forwarded to immigration court employees, launching a minor scandal. The logo has been traced back to a pro-Trump fascist group called the "Lion Guard." The group's name, and apparent ethos comes from a quote from Benito Mussolini that Trump approvingly tweeted in 2016: "It is better to live one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep." Back then, Trump claimed it was an accident born of ignorance that he approvingly quoted Mussolini, just as the DOJ claims it was an unfortunate accident that it mailed out links to white supremacist sites. That's the strategy in play: Wink at the fascists, and whenever you get called out on it, play innocent. more... - Was it an accident or was it on purpose?

Trump has repeatedly claimed he’s “the least racist person.” His history suggests otherwise.
By German Lopez

If you ask President Donald Trump, he isn’t racist. To the contrary, he’s repeatedly said that he’s “the least racist person that you’ve ever encountered.” Trump’s actual record, however, tells a very different story. On the campaign trail, Trump repeatedly made explicitly racist and otherwise bigoted remarks, from calling Mexican immigrants criminals and rapists to proposing a ban on all Muslims entering the US to suggesting a judge should recuse himself from a case solely because of the judge’s Mexican heritage. The trend has continued into his presidency. From stereotyping a black reporter to pandering to white supremacists after they held a violent rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, to cracking a joke about the Trail of Tears, Trump hasn’t stopped with the racist acts after his 2016 election. Most recently, Trump tweeted that several black and brown members of Congress are “from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe” and that they should “go back” to those countries. The tweets, aimed at Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), exemplify a common racist trope used against immigrants and minority groups who criticize US policies. Democrats, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, condemned Trump’s tweets as racist. more...

By elizabeth thomas and abby cruz

In the days since the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, more 2020 candidates have started using the words "white supremacist" to describe not just some of President Donald Trump's supporters, but even the president himself. So far, at least seven Democratic presidential contenders have escalated their criticism of Trump and his racist rhetoric, calling him a "white supremacist" outright. Other candidates, have shied away from using the harsh label, but instead have said he enables and encourages white supremacy across the country, claiming he's using divisive language as a political strategy. more...

Posted By Tim Hains

Anti-Defamation League head Jonathan Greenblatt appeared on CNN Wednesday morning to respond to the president saying American Jews who vote for Democrats are disloyal to Israel and the president's Wednesday morning retweet of radio host Wayne Allen Root saying Trump is so beloved is Israel he is like "the King of Israel." "I will say that it is the height of hypocrisy to use Christian theology to bully jews and to push out some messianic complex," Greenblatt said about the retweet. "Literally, it's hard to think of something less kosher than telling the Jewish people you're the king of Israel, and therefore we should have some fidelity to you for that reason. I don't know if he's read the bible, but in the Old Testament, that's not what we believe." more...

Yes, Donald Trump is an anomaly — for America. In global terms, the bully-turned-autocrat is distressingly common
By Paul Rosenberg

I wasn’t surprised by Donald Trump’s rage-tweet attack on Reps. Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib, any more than I was surprised by the maturity and sobriety of their response. After all, Trump’s racism is legendary, and telling them to “go back where you came from” is not just textbook racism, it’s a schoolyard bully’s taunt. And a racist schoolyard bully is the sum and substance of what Trump is. In fact, one expert, physician and psychiatrist Dr. Frederick "Skip" Burkle, told me that autocratic leaders typically have histories of being bullies, and that that the most important thing about them that the public needs to understand. I first contacted Burkle by way of counselor and therapist Elizabeth Mika, whose chapter in “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump” (Salon review here) explained that "Tyrannies are three-legged beasts": the tyrant, his supporters and the society as a whole. That perspective is vital to understand our specific predicament, which is historically unique only within our national borders. The generic predicament of racism is nothing new — particularly for the Republican Party. (See “The Long Southern Strategy.” Salon author interview here.) What is new is Trump’s malignant psychology, a character disorder shared by dozens of destructive autocratic leaders whose patterns of murderous rule Burkle described in a 2015 paper, “Antisocial Personality Disorder and Pathological Narcissism in Prolonged Conflicts and Wars,” drawing on  decades of experience as a world  leader in emergency public health crises such as war and conflict, as well as his background in psychiatry and pediatrics. A recent follow-up paper (“Character Disorders,” for short), focused on the negative impact autocratic leaders have on health security, human rights and humanitarian care. more...

By Vanessa Williamson and Isabella Gelfand

The Brookings Cafeteria podcast last week discussed the role President Trump’s racist rhetoric has played in encouraging violence in America. Predictably, some podcast listeners responded skeptically on Twitter, doubting the association between Trump and hateful behavior. It would be naïve to think that data will change many individuals’ minds on this topic, but nonetheless, there is substantial evidence that Trump has encouraged racism and benefitted politically from it. First, Donald Trump’s support in the 2016 campaign was clearly driven by racism, sexism, and xenophobia. While
some observers have explained Trump’s success as a result of economic anxiety, the data demonstrate that anti-immigrant sentiment, racism, and sexism are much more strongly related to support for Trump. Trump’s much-discussed vote advantage with non-college-educated whites is misleading; when accounting for racism and sexism, the education gap among whites in the 2016 election returns to the typical levels of previous elections since 2000. Trump did not do especially well with non-college-educated whites, compared to other Republicans. He did especially well with white people who express sexist views about women and who deny racism exists. more...

He thinks "The Hunt" is racist. Elijah Cummings, too. That tells us a lot about the president's sinister worldview.
By Matt Ford

President Donald Trump’s Twitter feed is, among other things, a gift to historians. No major historical figure has provided so thorough a public, real-time account of their daily thoughts and feelings. Future generations of Americans will almost certainly look back on this era with horror and astonishment—and thanks to the president’s stream-of-consciousness social-media habits, they’ll have the raw material to understand how it happened. With these tweets on Friday, Trump was almost surely referring to The Hunt, a horror film in which wealthy foreigners hunt “deplorables” for sport. The movie was scheduled for release in late September, but Universal Pictures, which had already paused its marketing campaign after the twin mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, cancelled it amid the political backlash from conservatives. Trump’s tweets on Friday followed similar remarks to the press earlier in the day. “Hollywood is really terrible,” he said. “You talk about racist—Hollywood is racist. What they’re doing, with the kind of movies they’re putting out—it’s actually very dangerous for our country.” more...

His racism and intolerance have always been in evidence; only slowly did he begin to understand how to use them to his advantage.
By David A. Graham, Adrienne Green, Cullen Murphy, and Parker Richards

The first quotation from Donald Trump ever to appear in The New York Times came on October 16, 1973. Trump was responding to charges filed by the Justice Department alleging racial bias at his family’s real-estate company. “They are absolutely ridiculous,” Trump said of the charges. “We have never discriminated, and we never would.” In the years since then, Trump has assembled a long record of comment on issues involving African Americans as well as Mexicans, Hispanics more broadly, Native Americans, Muslims, Jews, immigrants, women, and people with disabilities. His statements have been reflected in his behavior—from public acts (placing ads calling for the execution of five young black and Latino men accused of rape, who were later shown to be innocent) to private preferences (“When Donald and Ivana came to the casino, the bosses would order all the black people off the floor,” a former employee of Trump’s Castle, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, told a writer for The New Yorker). Trump emerged as a political force owing to his full-throated embrace of “birtherism,” the false charge that the nation’s first black president, Barack Obama, was not born in the United States. His presidential campaign was fueled by nativist sentiment directed at nonwhite immigrants, and he proposed barring Muslims from entering the country. In 2016, Trump described himself to The Washington Post as “the least racist person that you’ve ever encountered.” more...

By Matthew J. Belvedere

Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden on Friday defended his ability to go head-to-head with President Donald Trump in the general election. Trump is “the bully I knew my whole life,” Biden told CNN in an interview. “He’s the bully I’ve always stood up to.” Biden was asked how Democratic voters can have confidence that he’s up to taking on Trump when he had trouble sparring in last week’s debate against party rivals. “I don’t think I’m having trouble sparring. It’s how you want to spar,” Biden said. “This is ironic. I’ve never been accused of not being able to spar. I’ve been accused of being too aggressive.” Biden said he would beat Trump by “pointing out who I am and who he is and what we’re for and what he’s against.” “This guy is the ‘divider-in-chief,’” said Biden, who added he will “fight without being personal” in this campaign. “I think the American public want a president with some dignity who has a value set who is actually trying to restore the soul of this country,” argued Biden, who remains the front-runner for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. However, Biden’s early wide lead has narrowed considerably since rival Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., called him out in the June 27 debate over issues of race, including busing and comments about working with segregationist senators earlier in his career. Biden said he did not rewatch the debate and he’s not worried about how he’s perceived: “People know who I am.” more...

He’ll insult them in public, then demand a deal behind closed doors. The meeting in Osaka is another test case of the president’s dealmaking skills.
By Robbie Gramer

With U.S. President Donald Trump taking part in his third G-20 summit this week in Osaka, Japan, the world has grown fairly used to his negotiating style. He’ll most likely publicly insult longstanding U.S. allies, then turn around and demand they play ball on his foreign-policy priorities behind closed doors. It’s an all-too-familiar habit—along with Trump’s full-on embrace of Russian President Vladimir Putin, with whom he shared a laugh on Friday about Russian meddling in U.S. elections. But two and a half years into his presidency, the bully boy approach hasn’t gotten Trump all that far. He did manage to orchestrate a successor deal to NAFTA—one that looked a lot like its predecessor—and extract some more defense money from NATO countries. With frequent insults and threats, Trump also pushed the Mexican government to do more to address immigration, including sending 6,000 troops from the Mexican National Guard to its own southern border to stem the flow of migrants from Central America. So far, however, there haven’t been a lot of other goodies—and some experts say any short-term gain from the strong-arming tactics can come at a long-term cost. Today, foreign leaders can brush off the insults. Tomorrow, they might be less willing to strike a deal—or even face domestic political pressure to avoid one, lest they be seen as folding to the demands of a president who is deeply unpopular abroad. “Trump feels this tactic tills the ground, puts foreign leaders more on edge, and puts him in a more dominant negotiating position,” said Nancy McEldowney, a former senior U.S. diplomat now at Georgetown University. “But what he’s also done is creating a lot irritation between allies.” more...

By Rebecca Morin, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – Rep. Rashida Tlaib on Tuesday called President Donald Trump the "biggest bully" the congresswoman has faced in her life after he tweeted recently that she and three other Democratic congresswomen of color should "go back" to their countries. Tlaib, D-Mich, explained that was her first thought when she saw Trump's tweets, according to an interview with "CBS This Morning," that featured all four members of "The Squad," which also includes Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. "I'm dealing with the biggest bully I've ever had to deal with in my lifetime and trying to push back on that, and trying to do the job that we all have been sent here to do, which is centered around the people at home," Tlaib, who is Palestinian American, said. Three of the four freshmen lawmakers were born in the United States. Omar immigrated to the U.S. over 20 years ago from Somalia and is a naturalized citizen. Tlaib and Omar are the only two Muslim women in the House of Representatives. The interview with "The Squad" came before the House voted to condemn Trump's tweets as racist. The House passed the resolution 240-187. Over the weekend, Trump lashed out at the four Democratic congresswomen saying they should "go back" to fix the countries they "originally came from." He doubled down on his remarks several times since and denies that his repeated comments and attacks are racist. The Squad, however, on Monday afternoon held a press conference and denounced Trump's comments as "racist," "xenophobic," and "bigoted." During the CBS interview, Tlaib once again said Trump's remarks are a "distraction." Leading House Republicans have distanced themselves from Trump's comments, but did not go as far as labeling them as racist. more...

By Michael D'Antonio

(CNN) - In the umpteenth scandalous moment of his reign, the President tweeted that four Congresswomen -- three homegrown Americans and one who became a citizen of the United States at age 17 -- should "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." The racism in this attack is appalling, but it is not the only form of deviance on display. That would be the suggestion, which he later amplified, that Donald Trump has anointed himself the judge of who belongs in America and who does not. This should strike fear in every heart because it means that the most powerful person in the country -- with a large cohort of supporters ready to follow him anywhere -- has begun to sort and separate us from each other. In this moment he finds these four elected public servants unacceptable, but who's to say what he'll think about any of us tomorrow, should we dare to disagree with or challenge him? This is a serious question, with terrifying implications, that voters need to examine before they cast their vote in the 2020 election. Consider that as social beings who depend on our families, our communities, and yes, our country for our identity and well-being, few things are more upsetting than the prospect of being rejected and cast out. Shunning is so painful that most of us will go to great lengths to avoid it. Religious groups that use the threat of excommunication to keep people in line -- "in the fold" --understand this powerful dynamic and so do bullies who make a show of victimizing one kid in order to dominate everyone on the playground. As they make an example out of a target -- a kid whose pain is quite obvious to other kids -- schoolyard bullies can dominate everyone else in the schoolyard. If you didn't witness this as a youngster, you can consult many studies that confirm the process. Later in life, bullies may use this tactic as bosses in a workplace or as coaches of teams (think Bobby Knight) or in politics. These bullies instill in others the fear of being fired, cut from a team, or defeated in an election. In this way they gain control. more...

Some may say Trump's actions on Twitter are akin to cyberbullying. Donna Clark Love, a bullying expert, weighed in: “The people who tend to be bullies, online and in person, have an average or higher self-esteem than the one being bullied." Here are some of the most memorable incidents of Trump’s bullying, ranked from least to most offensive. more...

By Grace Panetta

Anthony Scaramucci, the former short-lived White House communications director, blasted President Donald Trump as a "very weak troll" and "a bully" as their public feud continues to escalate. After Trump attacked Scaramucci as having "nothing to do with my election victory" and claiming he "just wanted to be on TV," Scaramucci tweeted at Trump, "you're losing your fastball,' and added, "Time to call in a good relief pitcher. @potus is lost." The online brawl between the two began when Scaramucci, who famously served just 11 days in the summer of 2017 before being fired, criticized the president's response to mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio in a Thursday appearance on MSNBC's "Hardball" with Chris Matthews. more...

by Martin Longman

On one level, I understand the support evangelical Christians extend to Donald Trump. Many of the explanations provided to Washington Post reporter Julie Zauzmer appear legitimate so long as I’m willing to grant legitimacy to opinions and beliefs that strike me as reactionary and anti-scientific. I get that some people who see marriage as a sacred institution have trouble accepting same-sex marriage and don’t want to see the White House lit up in rainbow colors. I can empathize with business owners who want to be able to deny service to anyone for any reason. I understand that people want to protect their ability to impart their values to their children without government interference or widespread social or political condemnation. I can see why they saw the Obama administration as a threat and why they see Trump as a defender. But I am not sure that these things really get to the heart of Trump’s standing with evangelicals. Trump ran stronger with conservative Christians than either John McCain or Mitt Romney, and I can see a partial explanation for that. McCain famously denounced the Christian Right back in 2000 after his failed primary bid for president. Romney comes from a rival proselytizing faith. Trump isn’t an evangelical so he’s not a true member of the team, but at least he’s not an enemy or a competitor. Yet, why did he do better that George W. Bush, who actually was a member of the team? Trump is transparently a fraud, and this very much includes his ludicrous professions of personal faith. His relationship with evangelicals in completely cynical and transactional and many right-wing Christians are aware of the true nature of this arrangement. They used to tell us it was important to them that Dubya restored dignity to the office of the presidency, but although they continually profess personal discomfort with Trump’s personal morals and much of his behavior, they say they’ll take the bad in order to get the good. What I suspect is that Trump’s popularity with the Christian Right is actually tied to his behavior, and his policies are comparatively less important. more...

After the massacre, Trump visited Ohio victims and then criticized the mayor and Sen. Sherrod Brown as “very dishonest” and “misrepresenting” his visit.
By Sarah Ruiz-Grossman

Days after a mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, the city’s Democratic mayor, Nan Whaley, called President Donald Trump a “bully and a coward” after he came after her and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) for supposedly “misrepresenting” his visit to shooting victims in a hospital. In an interview on CNN late Wednesday, Whaley was asked her response to the president reportedly calling her and Brown “very dishonest people” after his visit. “I’ve watched President Trump’s Twitter feed for a while. He’s a bully and a coward,” the mayor said. “And it’s fine that he wants to bully me and Sen. Brown. We’re OK. We can take it. But the citizens of Dayton deserve action.” Over the weekend, two horrific mass shootings occurred within 24 hours in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton. In Dayton, the shooter left nine people dead and injured over two dozen others. Trump tweeted earlier Wednesday that Whaley and Brown were “totally misrepresenting” his hospital visit at a news conference they gave. At that news conference, however, Whaley had said the victims and first responders were “grateful” for Trump’s visit. She also called the president’s past rhetoric “divisive.” At a stop in El Paso the same day, Trump also told reporters that Whaley and Brown were “very dishonest” and said: “I get on Air Force One where they do have a lot of televisions. I turn on the television and there they are saying, ‘Well, I don’t know if it was appropriate for the president to be here.’” Whaley told CNN later she “really [didn’t] understand... at all” Trump’s comments on her and Brown. more...

New Jersey casino regulators have fined the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino $200,000 for catering to a high-roller by transferring black and female dealers from his table. The Casino Control Commission approved the penalty Wednesday by a 3-1 vote. The fine was twice the amount recommended by the commission's vice chairman but far less than the $900,000 sought by the state Division of Gaming Enforcement. more...   

Donald J. Trump assumed an increasingly prominent role in the business, the company’s practice of turning away potential black tenants was painstakingly documented by activists and organizations that viewed equal housing as the next frontier in the civil rights struggle. The Justice Department undertook its own investigation and, in 1973, sued Trump Management for discriminating against blacks. Both Fred Trump, the company’s chairman, and Donald Trump, its president, were named as defendants. It was front-page news, and for Donald, amounted to his debut in the public eye. more...

The FBI has released nearly 400 pages of records on an investigation the bureau conducted in the 1970s into alleged racial discrimination in the rental of apartments from President Donald Trump's real estate company. The files detail dozens of interviews the bureau conducted with Trump building tenants, management and employees, seeking indications that minority tenants were steered away from housing complexes. Most of those interviewed said they were not aware of any discrimination. However, some of the records recount the stories of black rental applicants who said they were told no apartments were available, while whites sent to check on the same apartments were offered leases. The records, posted on the FBI's Freedom of Information Act website, include a 1974 interview with a former doorman at a Trump building in Brooklyn. more...

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