"Where you can find almost anything with A Click A Pick!"
Go to content
Racism in America page 4

Learn more about racism in America, the events, laws and how racism helped shape America.

Racism in the United States has been widespread since the colonial era. Legally or socially sanctioned privileges and rights were given to white Americans but denied to all other races. The KKK, white mobs and other white supremacist groups have killed more Americans than terrorist have. The KKK may have given up their sheets for suites and changed their name to the alt-right or other names to hide who they are, but at their core, they are white people who hate black people, people whose skin is not white and Jews. White Racist Have Been Killing and Terrorizing Black People for Over 150 Years; if black lives mattered in America, the KKK and other white supremacist groups would be branded as the domestic terrorist groups they are and government resources would be devoted to combating them. #WhiteSupremacist, #WhiteNationalist, #RightWingExtremists, #KKK, #Racism, #Hate

No one was more at risk of experiencing violence and targeted racial  terror than black veterans who had proven their valor and courage as  soldiers during the Civil War, World War I, and World War II. Because of  their military service, black veterans were seen as a particular threat  to Jim Crow and racial subordination. Thousands of black veterans were  assaulted, threatened, abused, or lynched following military service. The disproportionate abuse and assaults against black veterans have never been fully acknowledged. This report highlights the particular  challenges endured by black veterans in the hope that our nation can  better confront the legacy of this violence and terror. No community is  more deserving of recognition and acknowledgment than those black men  and women veterans who bravely risked their lives to defend this  country’s freedom only to have their own freedom denied and threatened  because of racial bigotry.

By Minyvonne Burke

"Blackface photographs are inappropriate and offensive," Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul said. "They were inappropriate then and are inappropriate today." A Louisiana police department has found itself at the center of its own blackface scandal after a photo taken more than two decades ago surfaced showing two white Baton Rouge officers wearing face and body paint to appear as if they are black. In it, Lt. Don Stone and Capt. Frankie Caruso are seen dressed in denim outfits, hats and sunglasses with their exposed skin covered in brown paint as they strike a pose for the camera.

The photo, taken in 1993, was in the Baton Rouge Police Department yearbook, according to the media outlet The Rouge Collection, which featured the photo on its site. The picture was captioned "Soul Brothers." The image — the latest in blackface controversies popping up across the country in recent weeks — led to the Baton Rouge Police Department issuing an apology. "Blackface photographs are inappropriate and offensive," police Chief Murphy Paul said. "They were inappropriate then and are inappropriate today." According to the police department, the photo was taken before Stone and Caruso went undercover for a drug bust in a predominantly black neighborhood. "The Baton Rouge Police Department would like to apologize to our citizens and to anyone who may have been offended by the photographs," Paul said.

Marking the breakout of peace after World War I, President Donald Trump on Sunday heard a dire warning from his host: the forces that led to the slaughter are resurgent. Trump and dozens of his global counterparts gathered at the Arc de Triomphe in central Paris to mark 100 years since the nightmares of World War I ended, a conclusion brought about partly by the entry of the United States into the bitter, nationalism-fueled conflict. But decades later, as living memories fade of the trenches and the poison gas, nationalism is on the rise. It's been fueled by Trump himself, who has proudly identified himself as a nationalist as he advances an "America First" agenda. In his address, French President Emmanuel Macron -- who has emerged as Europe's most vocal sentry against a global tide of nationalism -- repeated his warnings.

"Patriotism is the exact opposite of nationalism," he said through a translator. "Nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism. By saying our interests first, who cares about the others, we erase what a nation holds dearest, what gives it life, what makes it great and what is essential: its moral values." "I know there are old demons which are coming back to the surface. They are ready to wreak chaos and death," he said. "History sometimes threatens to take its sinister course once again."

It was impossible to view his remarks as anything less than a rebuke of Trump, who has proudly espoused an "America First" foreign policy. Speaking later at an American cemetery in Paris, Trump did not directly respond, choosing instead to stick to a brief speech honoring the war dead. - Nationalism is the name racist people use to hide their racist propaganda. The Alt-Right (All White)  are white supremacist are the KKK without the white sheets. Donald J. Trump is a white nationalist he has shown he has a dislike for people who are not white. America deserves better than the likes of Donald J. Trump, the KKK, the Alt-Right (All White) and their hatred for people who are not white. America was not built by white people it was built on the backs of immigrants of all races.

Associated Press

LEWISTON, Maine — The mayor of Maine’s second-largest city resigned Friday in the wake of a controversy over his leaked text messages, one of which included a racist remark, and authorities confirmed he’s being investigated by the state attorney general’s office and the city police. Republican Shane Bouchard stepped down as Lewiston’s mayor effective immediately. Text messages made public by a woman who said she had an affair with Bouchard when he was a mayoral candidate revealed a racist remark he sent her while the two were working to undermine a political opponent. The woman, Heather Berube Everly, has said that she was the source of emails the Maine GOP used to attack Democratic opponent Ben Chin.

A website created by Maine Republican Party leader Jason Savage published emails from Chin’s campaign, including one in which Chin said he’s run into “a bunch of racists.” Bouchard went on to defeat Chin in the December 2017 runoff. The Sun Journal reported Everly has now made public more than 150 text exchanges with Bouchard. In one, Bouchard describes elderly black people as “antique farm equipment.” Bouchard apologized after the texts became public. He said he says “stupid things and stupid jokes occasionally.” He then held a brief press conference on Friday in which he said he’s “not a perfect person” and blamed the news media in part for his troubles. “It has become clear to me that the media does not acknowledge personal space and reports on nothing more than rumor in many cases.

In this political climate where the media does not discriminate between fact and rumors, it is hard to be a public figure,” he said. The investigation division of the Office of the Attorney General is working with the Lewiston Police Department on an investigation of the allegations against the now-former mayor, said Marc Malon, a spokesman for the office. He declined to comment further. City Council President Kristen Cloutier will take over as mayor until the election in November. She also said she doesn’t plan to run for the office. Cloutier said she’d heard some of the rumors concerning Bouchard’s campaign. “The campaign was fraught with those rumors. A lot of people had heard some of them,” she said. Bouchard has described the allegations of his affair with Everly as a rumor that was dealt with months ago. Everly hasn’t responded to e-mails seeking comment. The Lewiston Republican City Committee said in a statement Friday that it “offers its prayers to the mayor, his family, the Lewiston City Council, city
officials, citizens and neighbors.”

After an apparent celebration kicking off the return to 11 White History Months in a row, administrators at an exclusive private school in New York are scrambling to explain reports that a teacher held a series of mock slave auctions in which white students bid on their black classmates. According to WPIX, Rebecca Antinozzi, a white fifth-grade social studies teacher at Chapel School in Bronxville, N.Y., reportedly organized a mock slave auction where the teacher took the black students into the hall, put “imaginary chains” on their necks and wrists and shackled their ankles before parading them in front of their white classmates who posed as wealthy slave owners playing the original version of The Price Is Right’s showcase showdown.

By Barrett Holmes Pitner

Of course Trump prefers Andrew Jackson. But this episode forces contemplation of the worst possibility of all: Trump himself on our currency. Earlier this week, to almost no one’s surprise, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced that the Harriet Tubman $20 bill would be delayed until President Donald Trump leaves office. So if anyone wanted to know who’s to blame for Tubman’s absence and Andrew Jackson’s offensive presence on our greenbacks, Mnuchin clearly wants you to know it’s the guy throwing temper tantrums in the Oval Office.

I have no idea what Mnuchin’s opinion is on the Tubman situation because he always dodges the question, but honestly Mnuchin’s opinion never mattered. Trump has such a long history of racist statements and praising Andrew Jackson that we all expected him to never let Tubman appear on our currency—and especially not at the expense of his idol Jackson. Trump has been known to not want black accountants for his businesses because he did not want “black people handling his money,” instead preferring “guys with yarmulkes.” So if he despised the idea of black people touching his money, just think about how enraged he would become if black people were on his money.

By P.R. Lockhart

A new lawsuit from a Detroit man subjected to 911 calls for “gardening while black” could offer a way forward for other victims of recent racial profiling incidents. In 2018, stories of black people being racially profiled and subjected to unnecessary 911 calls dominated news headlines. This week, two more stories show that racial profiling remains a problem — but that the way people are handling such incidents may be changing. On March 1, a police officer in Boulder, Colorado, confronted an unidentified black man, a student at a local university, as he picked up trash in the yard of his student housing. Boulder police later said in a statement that the officer had approached the man “to determine if he was allowed to be on the property.”

In a video of the incident that went viral, the man explained that he lived and worked in the building, and showed the officer a student ID. But the officer still detained the man, saying that police needed to investigate further. When the man angrily objected to how he was being treated, the officer called for backup, saying that the man was “uncooperative and unwilling to put down a blunt object,” according to the Denver Post. “You’re on my property with a gun in your hand, threatening to shoot me because I’m picking up trash,” the man in the video yells at an officer. The man was not, ultimately, arrested, but the officer who initiated the confrontation has been placed on paid leave as the department launches an investigation into the incident. The case, which angered local residents, is the latest in a long line of “Living While Black” incidents that have attracted considerable news coverage and online outrage in recent months. It’s yet another reminder that racial profiling hasn’t gone away.

But because of this, it’s also important to look at another recent story: the news this week that Marc Peeples, a black man living in Detroit, has filed a $300,000 lawsuit against three white women who he says repeatedly made up incidents and called the police on him for more than a year, starting in 2017. In his lawsuit, Peeples notes that the women frequently called the police while he worked on a garden in the neighborhood, with the women eventually going so far as to accuse the man of committing a drive-by shooting, stalking them, and being a “convicted pedophile.” In 2018, the allegations led to Peeples being arrested and charged with stalking, but a judge threw out the case in October, saying that the women’s claims were “ridiculous” and “a waste of the court’s time and resources.”

Four educators who smiled for a photo with a noose are all suspended, along with their principal, who reportedly shared it in a mass email. Linda Brandt, the principal of Summerwind Elementary School in Palmdale, California, allegedly emailed the photo to her staff, attaching a second image of the noose hanging in an office, according to Los Angeles television station Fox 11. Other parents found the photo on Instagram. Palmdale School District Superintendent Raul Maldonado tells Yahoo Lifestyle, “Yesterday, it was brought to the Palmdale School District’s attention that an incident involving the discovery of a noose and possibly inappropriate responses to that discovery occurred at Summerwind Elementary School. The Principal and the personnel involved in this matter have been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation of the matter. We will follow process and procedures to conduct the investigation.”

By Jonathan Chait

Last week, Donald Trump argued that minority voters concerned about the fact that he is a gigantic racist should support him because the opposing party used to be the home of even more gigantic racists. “It is the Democratic Party,” the Republican nominee argued, “that is the party of slavery, the party of Jim Crow.” Conservatives place strange importance on the historical fact that the Democratic Party used to be the natural home of southern white racial conservatives. It is reasonably well known that the Democratic Party’s embrace of civil rights drove that faction out. The other, less known factor that altered the composition of the two parties was the conservative takeover of the GOP, which turned the party against civil rights at just the same time the Democrats were turning toward it.

Phyllis Schlafly, who died this weekend, happened to play an important role in this transformation. In 1960, when Schlafly first arrived on the national stage, the conservative movement was a minority faction within the Republican Party. Conservatives regarded the liberal and mainstream wings of the party Establishment, like Nelson Rockefeller and Dwight Eisenhower, with undisguised loathing. The faction fights within the GOP mirrored those within the Democratic Party. Just as conservative Democrats fought to stop liberal Democrats from moving their party left on civil rights, conservative Republicans did the same with liberal Republicans. In 1960, Schlafly led the conservative faction in a revolt against a platform plank opposing segregation and racial discrimination in voting and housing. In 1964, conservatives again defeated platform amendments endorsing the enforcement of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (which had already become law, over the objections of the Republican Party’s nominee, Barry Goldwater) and calling for the federal protection of voting rights. Just as racial liberals drove racial conservatives out of the Democratic Party, racial conservatives did the same in the Republican Party.


In the back of a nondescript building at the University of Maryland, a team of researchers combs through the files of homegrown extremists who have plotted attacks in the name of far-right causes. In each case, researchers are hunting for the motivation, the ideology, that inspired the violence. That means digging into the many elements that make up the far right, as researcher Michael Jensen explained on a recent afternoon. "White supremacist, white nationalist, white extremist, sovereign citizen, anti-government, Patriot [movement], neo-Nazis, skinhead. What else?" Jensen asked two of his colleagues, Elizabeth Yates and Patrick James. "I've seen 'anti-federalist' recently," Yates said. "We also deal with a lot of just specifically anti-Muslim or anti-immigrant," James added. "Kind of xenophobic cases." That list, rattled off on the spot, is nowhere near exhaustive, but it shows the complexities of trying to better understand far-right violence, which federal authorities say is the deadliest and most active form of domestic extremism. The labels the researchers use to code attacks are part of a wider debate over what to call the far-right threat — and how politics plays into that debate.

The poolside confrontations keep coming. This summer, a black boy was harassed by a white woman in South Carolina; a black woman was asked to provide identification by a white man in North Carolina; and a black man wearing socks in the water had the police called on him by a white manager of an apartment complex in Tennessee. The encounters, some captured on video, have prompted widespread anger and resulted in consequences for white people involved. But they are hardly new: The United States has a long history of people of color facing harassment and racism at swimming pools.

By Kayla Epstein

Several cities have launched investigations into the online conduct of their police officers after a database revealed thousands of racist and otherwise offensive social media posts by current or former members of law enforcement. The Plain View Project (PVP) has since 2017 examined the public profiles of police officers from eight jurisdictions. Its findings were detailed in an investigative feature published jointly by Injustice Watch and BuzzFeed News on Saturday. After matching published employee rosters with Facebook profiles, and examining the public posts those individuals made, the project found thousands of Facebook posts and comments that ran the gamut from racist memes to conspiracy theories to bombastic expressions of violence. Several expressed the desire to use a taser or deadly force on suspects, actions that have brought law enforcement under scrutiny in recent years and sparked nationwide protests against police brutality.

The term refers to the physical separation and provision of so-called "separate but equal" facilities, which were separate but rarely equal,as well as to other manifestations of racial discrimination, such as separation of roles within an institution: for example, in the United States Armed Forces before the 1950s, black units were typically separated from white units but were led by white officers. Signs were used to show non-whites where they could legally walk, talk, drink, rest, or eat. Segregated facilities extended from white only schools to white only graveyards.

Donald J. Trump, the President of the United States, has a history of making racially controversial remarks and taking actions widely seen as playing upon racial anxieties in the United States.

By Zak Cheney-Rice

For a political movement whose rallying cry was “build the wall” to keep Mexicans out of the United States, it was perhaps inevitable that a Muslim, Somali-born congresswoman would eventually have chants of “send her back” aimed her way. Spurred by President Donald Trump — who on Sunday tweeted that Democratic Representatives Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez should “go back” to the “totally broken and crime infested” countries they “originally came from” — supporters at his rally in Greenville, North Carolina shouted this directive on Wednesdsay after Trump suggested that Omar was an Al Qaeda sympathizer who looked down on Americans. Racist remarks are routine for the president, who, incidentally, saw his approval rating among Republican voters receive a five point jump after his bigoted tweetstorm, raising it to 72 percent.

But some Republican officials have expressed trepidation since Wednesday’s rally. Politico reports that a handful of GOP members of Congress approached Vice-President Mike Pence with concerns about Trump’s broadsides against the four Democratic congresswomen, three of whom, despite his rhetoric, were born in the U.S. “It’s one thing to do chants of ‘lock her up,’” Representative Paul Mitchell of Michigan told the outlet, referencing the 2016 pro-Trump rallying cry aimed at Hillary Clinton. “But a chant like [‘send her back’] is simply not reflective of our constitution.” (Neither is incarcerating people who haven’t been charged with or convicted of crimes, it’s worth noting.) “[Pence] said, ‘at first I couldn’t even tell what it was,’” added Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma. “And he said, ‘that just needs to not happen.’ [The vice-president] seemed as appalled by it as everybody else.” But perhaps the most telling response came from Representative Mark Walker of North Carolina, who in addition to being a former pastor, is vice-chairman of the House Republican conference. “We talked about [the chant], and [Pence] — we — felt like this is going to be part of our discussion to make sure we are not defined by that,” Walker said. “We want our policies, from the House all the way up to the administration, to define us.”

Fox News

Actor Ron Perlman had some choice words for GOP lawmakers in the wake of the ongoing controversy surrounding Rep. Steve King. The 68-year-old former 'Hellboy' star took to Twitter on Monday to share his distaste with certain members of the party that have spoken out against King, going as far as to compare them to the Ku Klux Klan. #FoxNews - No longer the party of Lincoln the GOP is a party of racist and racist sympathizers.


Ronald Reagan made racist remarks about African delegates to the United Nations, newly released audio recordings have revealed. 'Damn them, they’re still uncomfortable wearing shoes,' Reagan tells Richard Nixon, who erupts in laughter. At the time of the call, Nixon was still president and Reagan was governor of California.

The Rosewood Massacre was an attack on the predominantly African-American town of Rosewood, Florida, in 1923 by large groups of whites. The town was entirely destroyed by the end of the violence, and the residents were driven out permanently. The story was mostly forgotten until the 1980s, when it was revived and brought to public attention. ROSEWOOD, FLORIDA: Though it was originally settled in 1845 by both blacks and whites, black codes and Jim Crow laws in the years after the Civil War fostered segregation in Rosewood (and much of the South).

In American politics, the Southern strategy was a Republican Party electoral strategy to increase political support among white voters in the South by appealing to racism against African Americans. As the civil rights movement and dismantling of Jim Crow laws in the 1950s and 1960s visibly deepened existing racial tensions in much of the Southern United States, Republican politicians such as presidential candidate Richard Nixon and Senator Barry Goldwater developed strategies that successfully contributed to the political realignment of many white, conservative voters in the South who had traditionally supported the Democratic Party rather than the Republican Party.

It also helped to push the Republican Party much more to the right. The "Southern Strategy" refers primarily to "top down" narratives of the political realignment of the South which suggest that Republican leaders consciously appealed to many white Southerners' racial grievances in order to gain their support. This top-down narrative of the Southern Strategy is generally believed to be the primary force that transformed Southern politics following the civil rights era. This view has been questioned by historians such as Matthew Lassiter, Kevin M. Kruse and Joseph Crespino, who have presented an alternative, "bottom up" narrative, which Lassiter has called the "suburban strategy".

This narrative recognizes the centrality of racial backlash to the political realignment of the South, but suggests that this backlash took the form of a defense of de facto segregation in the suburbs rather than overt resistance to racial integration and that the story of this backlash is a national rather than a strictly Southern one. The perception that the Republican Party had served as the "vehicle of white supremacy in the South", particularly during the Goldwater campaign and the presidential elections of 1968 and 1972, made it difficult for the Republican Party to win back the support of black voters in the South in later years. In 2005, Republican National Committee chairman Ken Mehlman formally apologized to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), a national civil rights organization, for exploiting racial polarization to win elections and ignoring the black vote.

Springfield race riot of 1908 was a series of violent actions initiated against African Americans by a mob of about 5,000 European-Americans and European immigrants in Springfield, Illinois, between August 14 and 16, 1908. Two black men had been arrested as suspects in a rape, and attempted rape and murder. The alleged victims were two young white women and the father of one of them. When a mob seeking to lynch the men discovered the sheriff had transferred them out of the city, the European-Americans furiously spread out to attack black neighborhoods, murdered black citizens on the streets, and destroyed black businesses and homes. The state militia was called out to quell the rioting. The riot, trials and aftermath are said to be one of the most well-documented examples of the complex intersection of race, class, and criminal justice in the United States. In 2008 an NPR report on the centenary of the race riot said that the fact of its taking place in a Northern state, specifically in "The Land of Lincoln", demonstrated that blacks were mistreated across the country, not just in the South, and described the event as a proxy for the story of race in America. At least sixteen people died as a result of the riot: nine black residents, and seven white residents who were associated with the mob, five of whom were killed by state militia and two committed suicide. It was mistakenly reported for decades that blacks were responsible for white deaths and that more European-Americans than blacks had died. Personal and property damages, suffered overwhelmingly by blacks, amounted to more than $150,000 (approximately $4 million in 2018), as dozens of black homes and businesses were destroyed, as well as three white-owned businesses of suspected black sympathizers.

Republicans rebuked the Iowa representative for his recent racist remarks, exposing an uncomfortable truth: why does the party still support Trump’s similar views? When Iowa representative Steve King questioned how “white supremacy” and “white nationalism” became offensive terms, the nine-term Republican congressman was overwhelmingly rebuked by members of his own party. King, whose longstanding nativist views were well documented, was stripped of his committee assignments in Washington, and swiftly became the target of a Super Pac launched by Iowa Republicans with the goal of unseating him in 2020. Steve King stripped of committee posts after 'white nationalist' comments But the Republican response to King also exposed uncomfortable truths about the party’s penchant for attracting white nationalists: the individual most championed by the latter’s movement resides in the White House. “In many respects, Steve King was the easier target to go after. The harder target is Donald Trump,” said Michael Steele, former chairman of the Republican national committee. “We have had now three years of Donald Trump, as candidate for president and as president, espousing very similar views,” he added. Trump, much like King, has made sharp anti-immigrant sentiment central to his platform.

Racial and ethnic inequalities loom large in American society. People of color face structural barriers when it comes to securing quality housing, healthcare, employment, and education. Racial disparities also permeate the criminal justice system in the United States and undermine its effectiveness.

By James Loewen. 2005.

“Don’t let the sun go down on you in this town.” We equate these words with the Jim Crow South but, in a sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, award-winning and bestselling author James W. Loewen demonstrates that strict racial exclusion was the norm in American towns and villages from sea to shining sea for much of the twentieth century. Weaving history, personal narrative, and hard-nosed analysis, Loewen shows that the sundown town was—and is—an American institution with a powerful and disturbing history of its own, told here for the first time. In Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, sundown towns were created in waves of violence in the early decades of the twentieth century, and then maintained well into the contemporary era. Sundown Towns redraws the map of race relations, extending the lines of racial oppression through the backyard of millions of Americans—and lobbing an intellectual hand grenade into the debates over race and racism today.

POWAY, California - The 19-year-old was the son of a devout church elder, a high school overachiever, and a piano player who went on to shoot up a suburban San Diego synagogue. Nineteen-year-old nursing student John T. Earnest, who was charged with murder Sunday as the lone gunman in the deadly Poway Synagogue shooting, played piano for hours a day and earned a 4.31 grade point average. His father was a church elder whom neighbors called “the sweetest man.” But somewhere on his path, Earnest took a terrible turn, claiming Adolf Hitler as an idol and writing what appears to be his own rambling manifesto that Jews “deserved nothing but hell.” He wanted to be the one to, as he put it, “Send. Them. There.” Police say someone purporting to be him posted the anti-Semitic, Islamophobic, white supremacist “manifesto”—which eerily mirrored the Q&A style that Christchurch terrorist Brenton Tarrant used in his own pre-massacre diatribe—about 20 minutes before he walked into the Poway synagogue with an AR-15 style assault rifle and started shooting—killing one woman and injuring three others—before the gun malfunctioned and he was chased out by an armed security guard.

How America's Structural Racism Helped Create the Black-White Wealth Gap. The already large racial wealth gap between white and black American households grew even wider after the Great Recession. Targeted policies are necessary to reverse this deepening divide.

By Doug Criss and Leah Asmelash, CNN

(CNN) - It was the last thing anyone was expecting. Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger had just been sentenced to 10 years in prison for fatally shooting a black man, Botham Jean, in his own apartment. Jean's younger brother Brandt Jean was on the witness stand Wednesday, giving a victim-impact statement, when he turned to the judge and made a most unusual request. "I don't know if this is possible, but can I give her a hug, please?" he asked. What happened next stunned both the courtroom and the nation. Jean stepped off the witness stand and stepped over to Guyger. The two hugged for nearly a minute. "I forgive you. And I know if you go to God and ask Him, He will forgive you," Jean told Guyger. "I think giving your life to Christ is the best thing Botham would want for you."

This isn't the first time a black victim of violence has offered public forgiveness to the perpetrator. Some relatives of the nine victims in the 2015 Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting publicly forgave killer Dylann Roof just a few days after the massacre. The mother of Walter Scott, an unarmed man who was gunned down by a South Carolina police officer that same year, told CNN's Anderson Cooper that she felt "forgiveness in my heart." But many other black victims, including the mother of Michael Brown, slain in 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri, are not so quick to absolve. And not everyone agrees with this method of instant and public forgiveness. Trayvon Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, said earlier this year she has not been able to forgive George Zimmerman for killing her son in Florida in 2012. "I think black people are not forced to forgive, but they are expected to forgive, because there are so many times where we have forgiven people who have done mean, evil, and nasty things to us," she told Essence magazine.

Here's a look at why some people -- black and white alike -- opt to forgive, while others refuse. It's part of their Christian faith: Forgiveness is mentioned many times in the Bible and is a pinnacle of the Christian faith. "Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you," reads Ephesians 4:32. Another verse, Matthew 6:14, goes further: "For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you." These sentiments of forgiveness are reiterated again and again throughout the Bible, and Botham's family is quite acquainted with this Christian tradition. Like his brother, Brandt was raised in the Church of Christ in St. Lucia, where his family lives. His mother, Allison Jean, gave all of her three children Biblical middle names. Botham Jean's middle name was Shem, who was a son of Noah. Brandt's middle name is Samuel, after a prophet in the Old Testament.

A 52-year-old case is closed — unsolved. The Justice Department said it closed a 52-year investigation into the deaths of three activists killed while registering black voters in Mississippi. A look back at the case.

A high school teacher resigned from an Illinois high school after he was exposed by anti-racism activists as a cyber-racist, which is like regular racism but for white cowards who can only espouse their hate when they are far from negroes and have a good wi-fi connection. Online sleuths found a number of posts reportedly penned by the educator bragging about indoctrinating students with white nationalist ideology, finally answering the burning question: “What do racists put on their W-2s?” Kevin Pummill was a mild-mannered, unassuming teacher at Pekin Community High School in Pekin, Ill. But according to Identify Evropa, a website dedicated to outing white supremacists online, he was allegedly known as “Undercover Academic,” a pro-white social studies teacher who informed students at his lily-white school about the dangers of race mixing, Mexicans and—of course—the Jews. He also boasted about bringing his wife into the fold of white supremacy and lamented the number of non-white kids trick or treating in his neighborhood.

In his everyday life, Stephen Arnquist was a typical high school teacher. Since 2018, he has worked at Skyline High School in Dallas, Texas, whose student body is 99 percent non-white. Like many white men, he enjoyed activities such as balancing his sunglasses on the bill of his baseball cap, standing for the national anthem, wondering about Chicago and boasting about his Caucasian heritage. But Stephen Arnquist is also allegedly a white supremacist. To most people, Arnquist’s public persona came across like a store-brand white man. But online, it was as if the 33-year-old Japanese teacher had transformed himself from Dollar Tree Clark Kent into a super racist. Luckily, the instructor’s internet antics had been carefully concealed until an online group exposed Arnquist’s alleged white supremacist identity with the one element that could piece his cyber-Nazi armor. On Tuesday, Eugene Antifa, an anti-fascist group dedicated to outing white supremacists, published information connecting Arnquist to multiple hate groups and neo-Nazi websites, including Identity Evropa, Stormfront and American Renaissance. However, the post did not indicate if Arnquist was tied to the granddaddy of all extremist sites—Facebook.

Michael Steele made history when he became the first African-American chair of the Republican National Convention in 2009. Steele served in that role until 2011 and he likely wasn’t expecting to make headlines while in attendance at this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington, D.C. Then, this happened at the event’s annual Ronald Reagan dinner. “We were somewhat lost as a group, we had just elected the first African-American president, and that was a big deal and that was a hill that we got over and it was something that we were all proud of and we weren’t sure what to do, and in a little bit of cynicism what did we do? This is a terrible thing. We elected Mike Steele to be the RNC chair because he’s a black guy, that was the wrong thing to do.” —Ian Walters, CPAC Communications Director. Steele’s response to the remarks have ranged from refusing to accept an apology from CPAC officials to agreeing that the Republican Party has a “racism problem.” A 2016 Pew Research survey reveals that only about 7 percent of African-Americans identify as or lean Republican, even after the GOP’s efforts (including the selection of Steele as RNC head) to appeal to more black voters.

As some conservatives rhetorically wrestle with the racists in their ranks, they seem to keep avoiding the first step in ousting them.
by Michael Tomasky

This may surprise you, if you haven’t been following it, but a pretty interesting dialogue has opened up on the right about whether it’s possible to build a conservative movement free of racism. I know. It sounds like trying to build a coal industry without pollution. But the conversation has been—to a point—encouraging. I’m going to walk you through the recent phases of the argument so you’re right up to speed. It all began with a well-reported piece that appeared on the left-leaning web site Splinter, in which reporter Hannah Gais obtained some emails back and forth among some people in the conservative universe; none of them tier-one figures you see on cable a lot, but nevertheless people who occupy fairly prominent positions. I won’t try to summarize the whole thing, but just to give you a little taste, Gais was leaked a 2015 email in which one rightie writes to another: “In public places we avoid using certain terms. Like N and K. N’s are Alaskans. Hebes are Hawaiians.” Like that. Writing off that story, conservative Tim Carney in the Washington Examiner wrote that while liberals too often caricature all conservatives as racist, sometimes these charges are true, as the Splinter story proves, and that it’s on conservatives to deal with that. Carney’s headline states the admirable goal: “It’s time to build a conservative ecosystem that doesn’t welcome racists.”   

House Republicans could have rejected the president’s xenophobia. Instead, they went with it.
By John Nichols

Donald Trump’s assertion that four progressive Democratic congresswomen of color should “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came” was racist and xenophobic. On Tuesday evening, the US House of Representatives rejected it as such, voting 240 to 187 for a resolution that “strongly condemns President Donald Trump’s racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” The condemnation of Trump should have been unanimous. And it was, on one side of the aisle. All 235 House Democrats voted for it. But just four Republicans (Will Hurd of Texas, Fred Upton of Michigan, Susan Brooks of Indiana, and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania) joined in the condemnation, as did a former Republican who has left the party because of his objections to Trump and Trumpism, Justin Amash of Michigan.

The overwhelming majority of House Republicans, including the party’s key House leaders and ranking committee members, formed the group of 187 that rejected appropriate and necessary criticism of the president. In so doing, they identified themselves and their party with Trump’s racism and xenophobia. This was a choice—a definitional choice. It delighted Trump, who tweeted: “So great to see how unified the Republican Party was on today’s vote concerning statements I made about four Democrat Congresswomen.” The president, with his boundless self-absorption, had reason to be pleased. If and when historians point to the moment when “the party of Lincoln” formally degenerated into the party of Trump, and all that Trump stands for, they will be hard-pressed to find a better illustration than the night when 98 percent of House Republicans gave racism and xenophobia a pass. Of course, that degeneration began long ago. This is the party that welcomed Strom Thurmond into its ranks in in 1964.

The Thibodaux massacre was a racial attack mounted by white paramilitary groups in Thibodaux, Louisiana in November 1887. It followed a three-week strike during the critical harvest season by an estimated 10,000 workers against sugar cane plantations in four parishes: Lafourche, Terrebonne, St. Mary, and Assumption parishes. The strike was the largest in the industry and the first conducted by a formal labor organization, the Knights of Labor. At planters' requests, the state sent in militia to protect strikebreakers, and work resumed on some plantations. Black workers and their families were evicted from plantations in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes and retreated to Thibodaux. Tensions broke out in violence on November 23, 1887, and the local white paramilitary forces attacked black workers and their families in Thibodaux. Although the total number of casualties is unknown, at least 35 black people were killed in the next three days (more historians believe 50 were killed) and as many as 300 overall killed, wounded or missing, making it one of the most violent labor disputes in U.S. history. Victims reportedly included elders, women and children. All those killed were African American. The massacre, and passage by white Democrats of discriminatory state legislation, including disenfranchisement of most blacks, ended the organizing of sugar workers for decades, until the 1940s. According to Eric Arnesen, "The defeated sugar workers returned to the plantations on their employers' terms."

The decision of Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina to change his political affiliation from Democratic to Republican has at least candor and consistency to recommend it. Beginning in 1948 when Mr. Thurmond was the Presidential candidate of the States Rights third party, many Southern Democrats in Congress have tacitly or avowedly defected from their party's national ticket every four years. As soon as the election was over, these same Southern Congressmen have turned up on Capitol Hill to claim the committee chairmanships and the other perquisites that the seniority system confers on members wearing the majority party label. Senator Thurmond's action cuts through this hypocrisy. It may even embolden the Democratic leadership in Congress to abandon the feeble doctrine that “anyone is a Democrat who says he is” and thus organize legislative committees according to some principles of party responsibility. The immediate political consequences of Mr. Thurmond's bolt are not likely to be impressive. His active espousal of Senator Goldwater's candidacy may enable the Republicans to capture South Carolina's eight electoral votes, a modest prize that has narrowly eluded them in each of the last three Presidential elections. However, since General Eisenhower could not carry the state, even this is doubtful. Elsewhere in the South, Senator Thurmond's appeal is confined to the diehard white supremacists, most of whom have already adopted Mr. Goldwater as their hero.

By Alex Lockie

President Richard Nixon in 1971 declared a US "war on drugs" that hasn't saved the US from the dangers of drugs, but has fueled migrant crises and the mass incarceration of minorities in the US. A top Nixon aide told an author that the policy was specifically designed to target opposition to Nixon: Blacks and Hippies. Today, hundreds of thousands of people of color languish in jail for drug charges as the US's seemingly insatiable appetite for drugs wreaks havoc on countries in Latin America, fuelling humanitarian crises at the border and far beyond it. President Richard Nixon in 1971 declared a US "war on drugs" that, over the decades, fueled mass incarceration and the crisis at the US's southern border without preventing Americans from accessing dangerous drugs, and one of his top aides say it's because it was a racist policy implemented as a power grab. Criminalizing possession of drugs like heroin and marijuana was intended to "disrupt" two of the biggest anti-establishment forces that opposed Nixon, one of his top advisors later admitted. Nixon, the only US president to resign in scandal, presided over the waning days of the Vietnam war, a relentlessly brutal fight over far away lands that nominally represented a fight between the free world and communism.

The Guardian - In the Emmy-nominated virtual reality project, viewers are given an immersive historical experience on the depressingly topical dangers of being black in America. The theatre has luxurious red velvet upholstered seats, grand ceilings and gilded trimmings. The rows of chairs stretch back into the ostensible blackness, with light beaming from the projector room. Ahead, archival footage of stylish black travelers pack the screen as an unseen narrator discusses the hardships of mid-20th-century black travel. Enabled by modern technology but trapped by racist social convention, their trips were eventually greatly eased by the publication of the Green Book, which listed safe spaces for black people to sleep, eat and replenish.

A car gradually appears next to the stage in black and white and a Green Book institution, Washington DC’s Ben’s Chili Bowl, comes into view. The seats have dissipated into a silent, empty U Street. For the next 20 minutes, the viewer will journey through the traumatic stories lent to Emmy-nominated virtual reality documentary Traveling While Black, which discusses the agony and trepidation of a people moving through a country that has not fully accepted them. Traveling While Black is the first virtual reality project by Oscar-winning documentarian Roger Ross Williams, in collaboration with virtual reality studio Felix and Paul Studios. Glued together by the deep terror of racism, the documentary relies on a collection of interviews and poetic cinematic recreations to tell the harrowing tale of the danger that comes with having black skin. Originally developed from a play as a multimedia project, someone suggested it might take better life as virtual reality project. Even so, its initial development was rocky.

“It was tough figuring out the landscape because everything is so new,” Williams said. “At one point, this piece was going to be animated. At one point, we wrote a script and were talking to actors...” But all parties agree that the story works best told through documentary film-making. “Documentaries are a lot more immediately mature as a medium of virtual reality, as a genre, as a format than fiction. We saw that this was too sensitive of a shoot to be experimenting with,” said Paul Raphael of Felix and Paul Studios. “We really wanted to do the material justice. It’s not the kind of subject you want to approach and not be respectful of.”

By Devan Cole, CNN

Washington (CNN) - President Donald Trump used racist language on Sunday to attack progressive Democratic congresswomen, falsely implying they weren't natural-born American citizens. Trump did not name who he was attacking in Sunday's tirade but earlier this week he referenced New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez when the President was defending House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. A group of Democrats, who are women of color and have been outspoken about Trump's immigration policies, last week condemned the conditions of border detention facilities. The group of women joining Ocasio-Cortez were Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts. Ocasio-Cortez, Tlaib and Pressley are natural-born US citizens, while Omar was born in Somalia and immigrated to the US when she was young. Omar became a citizen in 2000 when she was 17 years old, according to the New York Times. Trump implied in the series of tweets that the congresswomen weren't born in America and sarcastically suggested, "they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." Pelosi jumped to the defense of the congresswomen and condemned Trump's language. "When ⁦‪@realDonaldTrump⁩ tells four American Congresswomen to go back to their countries, he reaffirms his plan to "Make America Great Again" has always been about making America white again," Pelosi tweeted. "Our diversity is our strength and our unity is our power." New Mexico Rep. Ben Ray Luján, the assistant speaker of the House, echoed Pelosi's sentiments on Twitter Sunday: "A racist tweet from a racist president."

It’s been over a year since his election, and Trump has only doubled down on his racist rhetoric and policies. He’s spent much of that time reaffirming the legacy of racism upon which he built both his campaign and his real estate business. From taco bowls and travel bans to “birtherism” and scorn about Black Lives Matter, HuffPost has kept running lists during and after the election detailing examples of Trump’s racism dating as far back as the 1970s. We’ll continue to document those incidents here as they happen.

In his first tweet on Saturday morning, President Donald Trump ignored the first player picked in the NFL draft, Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray, who is black, to praise the number two pick -- a white player with a history of racist tweets. In his tweet, Trump skipped over the Heisman Trophy winner to celebrate Ohio State's Nick Bosa -- who missed most of the 2018 season -- for being picked second. "Congratulations to Nick Bosa on being picked number two in the NFL Draft. You will be a great player for years to come, maybe one of the best. Big Talent! San Francisco will embrace you but most importantly, always stay true to yourself. MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!" he tweeted. According to to the San Franciso Chronicle,"Bosa recently deleted tweets in which he called Colin Kaepernick a 'clown,' referred to Beyonce’s music as 'complete trash' and called 'Black Panther' the worst Marvel movie. On Thursday, the website Blacksportsonline posted threads showing Bosa following and liking accounts that feature white nationalist posts. The twitter feed @rzstprogramming showed Bosa retweeted a tweet referring to 'crappernick.'"

The factual evidence seems strong. Trump’s father Fred was arrested in New York City in 1927, when a group of Klansmen got into a brawl with police officers during a Memorial Day parade in Queens. There is a document trail, and the names, dates, and addresses match up. The New York Times published a story about the riot and the seven men who were arrested; Fred Trump is mentioned by name. His address is given at 175-24 Devonshire Road, Jamaica, New York City, and the federal census of 1930 shows that Fred Trump resided at that address.

It's not your imagination: President Trump, who regularly makes a point of personally insulting public figures who challenge or displease him in any way, taps into an especially toxic well of vitriol when aiming his attacks at black Americans. This week alone, Trump berated CNN correspondent Abby Phillip ("What a stupid question. But I watch you a lot. You ask a lot of stupid questions.") He said of April Ryan, a reporter and CNN contributor who has covered the White House for 21 years: "You talk about somebody that's a loser. She doesn't know what the hell she's doing." And at a post-election press conference, when Yamiche Alcindor of "PBS NewsHour" began to ask about accusations that his rhetoric may have emboldened violent white nationalist groups, Trump interrupted with, "I don't know why you say that. That is such a racist question." The three women -- all of them gifted, accomplished professionals -- will be covering politics long after Trump has left the White House. They join a long list of athletes, entertainers, journalists and politicians who Trump routinely attacks as "dumb," "not qualified" or some such insult. None of this is subtle or secret; that would defeat the purpose. For Trump, loudly and publicly denigrating black figures is the whole point. - Donald J. Trump is racist white nationalist who projects his weakness on to others.

It is undeniably true that America’s president opposes diversity.
By Charles M. Blow

Donald Trump keeps trying to convince any disbelieving holdouts that he is a raging racist. At least, that’s how I imagine his motives. In truth, it is more likely that his truest nature is simply being revealed, again and again, and he is using his own racism to appeal to the racism in the people who support him. On Sunday morning, the same day that the Trump administration earlier announced it would conduct raids to round up undocumented immigrants, Trump weighed in again on the conflict between four female freshmen congresswomen and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, tweeting a series of three of the most racist tweets he could produce: So interesting to see “Progressive” Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly ... ... and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how. ... ... it is done. These places need your help badly, you can’t leave fast enough. I’m sure that Nancy Pelosi would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements! Those progressive congresswomen are Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts.


(CNN)University of Michigan police are investigating after a noose was found on an employee's desk at a university hospital. The university has "taken immediate action" to investigate the incident that occurred Thursday as an act of discrimination and criminal ethnic intimidation, said Dr. Marschall S. Runge, the dean of the University of Michigan Medical School. "This act of hate violates all of the values that we hold dear and will not be tolerated," Runge said in a statement, calling the noose a "symbol of hate and discrimination." Heather Young, a university police spokeswoman, told CNN the desk is "a shared workspace, shared by multiple people," and it's "difficult to answer" questions about the race or ethnicity of the employees who use it.

For two decades, domestic counterterrorism strategy has ignored the rising danger of far-right extremism. In the atmosphere of willful indifference, a virulent movement has grown and metastasized. White supremacists and other far-right extremists have killed far more people since Sept. 11, 2001, than any other category of domestic extremist.

The Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism has reported that 71 percent of the extremist-related fatalities in the United States between 2008 and 2017 were committed by members of the far right or white-supremacist movements. Islamic extremists were responsible for just 26 percent. Data compiled by the University of Maryland’s Global Terrorism Database shows that the number of terror-related incidents has more than tripled in the United States since 2013, and the number of those killed has quadrupled. In 2017, there were 65 incidents totaling 95 deaths.

In a recent analysis of the data by the news site Quartz, roughly 60 percent of those incidents were driven by racist, anti-Muslim, anti-Semitic, antigovernment or other right-wing ideologies. Left-wing ideologies, like radical environmentalism, were responsible for 11 attacks. Muslim extremists committed just seven attacks. These statistics belie the strident rhetoric around “foreign-born” terrorists that the Trump administration has used to drive its anti-immigration agenda.

Dareh Gregorian and Hallie Jackson

Ralph Northam was on Friday night resisting growing calls from fellow Democrats as well as Republicans for him to step down. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam apologized Friday for appearing in a racially offensive photo on his medical school yearbook page that featured men in blackface and Ku Klux Klan robes. But a growing number of fellow Democrats and Republicans called on him to resign.

"Earlier today, a website published a photograph of me from my 1984 medical school yearbook in a costume that is clearly racist and offensive," Northam said in a statement. "I am deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now." He added, "This behavior is not in keeping with who I am today and the values I have fought for throughout my career in the military, in medicine and in public service. But I want to be clear, I understand how this decision shakes Virginians’ faith in that commitment.

"I recognize that it will take time and serious effort to heal the damage this conduct has caused. I am ready to do that important work. The first step is to offer my sincerest apology and to state my absolute commitment to living up to the expectations Virginians set for me when they elected me to be their Governor." Five Democrats who have announced 2020 presidential runs or said they would form exploratory committees — Julián Castro, Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand — said Northam should resign.

In the video captured by a member of the Dream Defenders, a woman we shall call “Toe-ler Swift” pushes one of the young men she claims ran over her pink toes. The footage (see what I did there?) shows that the boys do not touch the woman as she angrily berates them, calling them a “bunch of thugs” [sic]. Halfway through the clip, a man carrying what appears to be a firearm emerges from an SUV. As he wields the weapon, the woman informs Captain Save-a-Toe that one of the boys ran over her foot, pointing him out to the gunman. The boys scatter while the man yells at them, calling them “dumb-ass fucking niggers” and “stupid niggers” while carrying what police later described as a Springfield XT9 automatic pistol.

Jacksonville’s enforcement of pedestrian violations raises concerns that it’s another example of racial profiling.
by Topher Sanders and Kate Rabinowitz, ProPublica, and Benjamin Conarck, Florida Times-Union

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office issues hundreds of pedestrian citations a year, drawing on an array of 28 separate statutes governing how people get around on foot in Florida’s most populous city. There is, of course, the straightforward jaywalking statute, barring people from crossing against a red light. But in Jacksonville, pedestrians can also be ticketed for crossing against a yellow light, for “failing to cross a street at a right angle,” for not walking on the left side of a road when there are no sidewalks, or alternatively for not walking on a sidewalk when one is available.

The sheriff’s office says the enforcement of the full variety of pedestrian statutes is essential to keeping people alive in a city with one of the highest pedestrian fatality rates in the nation. The office also says the tickets are a useful crime-fighting tool, allowing officers to stop suspicious people and question them for guns and or drugs.

However, a ProPublica/Florida Times-Union analysis of five years of pedestrian tickets shows there is no strong relationship between where tickets are being issued and where people are being killed. The number of fatal crashes involving pedestrians, in fact, climbed every year from 2012 to 2016, the most recent years for which complete data is available.

What the analysis does show is that the pedestrian tickets — typically costing $65, but carrying the power to damage one’s credit or suspend a driver’s license if unpaid — were disproportionately issued to blacks, almost all of them in the city’s poorest neighborhoods. In the last five years, blacks received 55 percent of all pedestrian tickets in Jacksonville, while only accounting for 29 percent of the population. Blacks account for a higher percentage of tickets in Duval County than any other large county in Florida.

Blacks, then, were nearly three times as likely as whites to be ticketed for a pedestrian violation. Residents of the city’s three poorest zip codes were about six times as likely to receive a pedestrian citation as those living in the city’s other, more affluent 34 zip codes. Full Story

By Harry J Enten

Once you control for region, it turns out that Democrats were actually more likely to support the 1964 Civil Rights Act. With Republicans having trouble with minorities, some like to point out that the party has a long history of standing up for civil rights compared to Democrats. Democrats, for example, were less likely to vote for the civil rights bills of the 1950s and 1960s. Democrats were more likely to filibuster. Yet, a closer look at the voting coalitions suggests a more complicated picture that ultimately explains why Republicans are not viewed as the party of civil rights. Let's use the 1964 Civil Rights Act as our focal point. It was arguably the most important of the many civil rights bills passed in the middle part of the 20th century. It outlawed many types of racial and sexual discrimination, including access to hotels, restaurants, and theaters. In the words of Vice President Biden, it was a big "f-ing deal". When we look at the party vote in both houses of Congress, it fits the historical pattern. Republicans are more in favor of the bill:

And now, as separated families try to reunite, it’s worth thinking back on black American families’ attempts to do the same after the Civil War.

Vox
The hidden history of an American coup.

White nationalist, right-wing extremists and other white supremacist groups have killed more Americans than terrorist have. White nationalist, right-wing extremists and other white supremacist groups are domestic terrorist and should be branded as the domestic terrorist they are.

This page was added due to the increasing number of incidents around America in which white people call police on black people going about their everyday activities. We had Driving while black (DWB) and Walking While Black (WWB). Now Just Being Black (JBB) will cause you problems. Racism in America is nothing new black people have been killed simply for looking at a white woman or because of a perceived disrespect towards a white person.

White Racist, White Mobs, White Nationalist,  Right-Wing Extremists, the KKK and Other White Supremacist Groups Have  Been Killing and Terrorizing Black People for Over 150 Years; if Black lives mattered in America, the KKK and other white supremacist groups would be branded as the domestic terrorist groups they are.

White supremacy or white supremacism is a racist ideology based upon the belief that white people are superior in many ways to people of other races, and that therefore, white people should be dominant over other races. White supremacy has roots in scientific racism, and it often relies on pseudoscientific arguments. Like most similar movements such as neo-Nazism, white supremacists typically oppose members of other races as well as Jews. The term is also typically used to describe a political ideology that perpetuates and maintains the social, political, historical or institutional domination by white people (as evidenced by historical and contemporary sociopolitical structures such as the Atlantic slave trade, Jim Crow laws in the United States, and apartheid in South Africa). Different forms of white supremacism put forth different conceptions of who is considered white, and different groups of white supremacists identify various racial and cultural groups as their primary enemy.

A white supremacist ran down and killed a young black man in Oregon has been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for 28 years

By Ryan J. Reilly and Christopher Mathias

The latest setback in a domestic terrorism-related case shows how much tougher it is for the feds to prosecute neo-Nazis than Muslim extremists. A federal judge this week cited the First Amendment in tossing criminal charges against three members of a neo-Nazi organization accused of conspiring to assault their ideological opponents, handing the government another defeat in its struggle to curtail white supremacist violence. Robert Rundo, Robert Boman and Aaron Eason, all members of the violent white nationalist group Rise Above Movement (RAM), were charged last year under the federal Anti-Riot Act in connection with their actions at political rallies across California in 2017.

Prosecutors alleged that the men conspired to assault opposing protesters at political rallies in Huntington Beach and San Bernardino and on the campus at the University of California, Berkeley. The men sometimes taped their hands and wore skull masks allegedly in preparation for violent encounters. Video evidence showed them punching and kicking protesters. Rundo, one of the group’s founders, even punched a police officer twice in the head. An FBI affidavit accused the men of using social media to “prepare to incite and participate in violence.” The men, according to the criminal complaint, “publicly documented their assaults in order to recruit” other white men to join RAM. But on Monday, U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney found the Anti-Riot Act of 1968 to be “unconstitutionally overbroad,” writing in his order dismissing the indictment that the law had a “chilling effect” on free speech.

Instead of focusing on criminalizing “acts and imminent threats of violence,” he wrote, the Anti-Riot Act “focuses on pre-riot communications and actions” and “sweeps in a wide swath” of protected activity. “Although some alleged overt acts create no First Amendment problem, the Indictment also contains a substantial amount of protected expressive activity,” the judge wrote. “It charges the Defendants with making social media posts months before ― and months after ― any political rallies. Some posts express repugnant, hateful ideas. Other posts advocate the use of violence. Most, if not all, are protected speech.” Two of the defendants, Rundo and Boman, were still in federal custody before the judge’s ruling and were released on Monday after the cases were dismissed, according to one of the taxpayer-funded lawyers representing them. A fourth RAM member, Tyler Laube, had pleaded guilty last year to a single conspiracy-to-riot charge, but that charge could also be dismissed if he enters a similar motion.

White supremacists were responsible for twice as many U.S. murders as  Islamic extremists were reponsible for last year, according to a new report. Extremists of all stripes killed 34 people last year in the U.S., according to the Anti-Defamation League’s “Murder and Extremism in the United States in 2017”  report. Of those 34 deaths, white supremacists were responsible for 18 —  more than half — while Islamic extremists were linked to 9, the report  found. The number of murders committed  by white supremacists doubled from the number of white  supremacist-linked killings in 2016, according to the report. Included  in that number is the death of Heather Heyer, who was protesting a white  nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., when rally attendee James Fields, 20, allegedly ran her over with his car.

Baffling as it may sound, white supremacists blame Jews for political shifts in America that granted blacks their civil rights and enabled waves of Hispanic immigration. Jews, they say, are the root of all evil. Some of the first images and videos that came out of the white supremacist rally at the University of Virginia last weekend featured chants and imagery against Jews. "Jews will not replace us!" the tiki-torch bearing protesters shouted as they marched Friday night. "Blood and soil!" (the latter is an English version of a Nazi slogan). Throughout the day Saturday, marchers displayed swastikas on shirts, flags and posters, as well as quotes from Adolf Hitler.

They yelled "Heil Hitler!" and "Heil Trump!" And they stood outside a local Jewish temple with guns.  As a result, some have wondered why white supremacists – a group associated with xenophobia and racism against people of color – would show such a strong outpouring of anti-Semitism. After all, aren’t many Jews in the United States white? (According to Pew, 94 percent of Jews identify as such.) Not according to neo-Nazis, who believe American Jews are a non-white race that is ruining the country. Longtime civil rights strategist Eric Ward says anti-Jewish sentiment is at the core of everything the Charlottesville rally goers stand for. "Anti-Semitism is part and parcel of the movement," Ward says. "It is the oxygen and the fuel that allows the engine of the alt-right and nationalist movement to thrive and breathe. It is the paper upon which all the other forms of bigotry are being written upon." The white nationalist worldview, he says, suggests whites are a minority under assault, and that Jews are seeking to take away their rights.


Back to content