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US News July 2019: Get the latest monthly headline news from multiple news sources and news links. Get real facts, real news from major news originations.  

Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large
(CNN) - Donald Trump wants to create an America that runs directly counter to the "melting pot" principle on which the country has prided itself for generations. This isn't an opinion. It is a statement of fact. How else can we take Trump's Sunday morning tweets -- directed at freshman Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (Minn.), Rashida Tlaib (Mich.) and Ayanna Pressley (Mass.) -- in which he told the quartet, in essence, to go back where they came from? Wrote Trump: "So interesting to see 'Progressive' Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don't they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." Trump continued his attacks Monday morning, calling for the "Radical Left Congresswomen," who he again did not name, to "apologize to our Country, the people of Israel and even to the office of the President" for what he called "their horrible & disgusting actions." Let's start with some facts. Of the four people Trump told to go home to their own country, 3 of the 4 were born in the United States. The 4th -- Omar -- was born in Somalia, spent four years in a refugee camp in Kenya, arrived in the US at age 12 and is a naturalized US citizen, according to the New York Times. So, telling them to go back to their "totally broken and crime infested placed from which they came" makes very, very little factual sense. But Trump isn't terribly concerned with the facts here. It's the sentiment that matters to him.

By Jennifer Hassan
LONDON — Lawmakers and commentators around the world expressed shock and disgust Monday after President Trump targeted Democratic minority congresswomen in tweets over the weekend and told them to “go back” to their countries. On U.S. soil, the tweets prompted outrage, with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) branding Trump’s string of remarks as “xenophobic comments meant to divide our nation,” and Democrats defending those believed to be at the center of Trump’s fury: Reps. Ayanna Pressley (Mass.), Rashida Tlaib (Mich.), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.) and Ilhan Omar (Minn.). While Republicans remained overwhelmingly silent, lawmakers around the world were not. British politician David Lammy branded Trump’s comments “1950s racism straight from the White House” and called for Boris Johnson, who is in the running to replace Theresa May as prime minister, to condemn the remarks.

By Rosena Allin-Khan
I have been told to ‘go home’ – especially on Twitter, when someone disagrees with me. Back a People’s Vote? Go home. Talk about sexism in football? Go home. And now, I assume, I would get the same treatment from the leader of the free world. From as early as I can remember, I was used to meeting people and their first two questions being: “What is your name?” and “Where do you come from?” – and not always in that order. My answer was always “Tooting” and still is today. The questions did not, and do not, stop there: “Where do you REALLY come from?” – with a huge emphasis on the “really”. My mother was born in Poland, my father in Pakistan, and I identify as being 100 per cent Tooting. Generally, people understand this and I am so fortunate to represent an area which is so vibrant and diverse. There are people from all backgrounds, first generation, second generation and beyond, who each day have to go through the same line of questioning over and over.  Most importantly though, we are all British. Regardless of background, we all live here because we share the same values, support the same teams, enjoy a cup of tea. On occasion, I have been told to “go home” – especially on Twitter, when someone disagrees with me. Back a People’s Vote? Go home. Talk about sexism in football? Go home. Criticise Donald Trump? Go home. How do you want me to “go home” exactly? Get the tube south on the Northern Line? Get a bus? Taxi?  I have never been told to “go home” by the American President. But going by his track record now, anything is possible. Donald Trump’s weekend attack on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib sought to do exactly what those who seek to undermine me want to do, to make us appear as the “other”. In truth all he’s doing is seeking to limit the voices of Americans. The irony is remarkable. Four of Trump’s children have mothers born in Eastern European countries. Would he tell his own children to “go home”? I don’t think so. Is it any coincidence that he has decided to take a swipe at four rising stars in the Democratic Party? Politics is changing – for the good as well as the bad. Congress is now more racially diverse than ever. American people are being represented more and more by people who have similar life experiences.


David Jackson, USA TODAY
WASHINGTON – Under fire for what many called racist tweets, President Donald Trump said Monday that the minority Democratic congresswomen he said should "go back" to other countries are the ones who should apologize. "When will the Radical Left Congresswomen apologize to our Country, the people of Israel and even to the Office of the President, for the foul language they have used, and the terrible things they have said," Trump tweeted. "So many people are angry at them & their horrible & disgusting actions!" He did not detail those alleged actions. On Sunday, Trump tweeted of four minority female House members: "Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how it is done" – this even though three of the four targets were born in the United States. When will the Radical Left Congresswomen apologize to our Country, the people of Israel and even to the Office of the President, for the foul language they have used, and the terrible things they have said. So many people are angry at them & their horrible & disgusting actions! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 15, 2019. Trump's tweets were directed tweets at four Muslim, Hispanic, and black House freshmen members known as "the Squad:" Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

It is undeniably true that America’s president opposes diversity.
By Charles M. Blow
Donald Trump keeps trying to convince any disbelieving holdouts that he is a raging racist. At least, that’s how I imagine his motives. In truth, it is more likely that his truest nature is simply being revealed, again and again, and he is using his own racism to appeal to the racism in the people who support him. On Sunday morning, the same day that the Trump administration earlier announced it would conduct raids to round up undocumented immigrants, Trump weighed in again on the conflict between four female freshmen congresswomen and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, tweeting a series of three of the most racist tweets he could produce: So interesting to see “Progressive” Democrat Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly ... ... and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run. Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came. Then come back and show us how. ... ... it is done. These places need your help badly, you can’t leave fast enough. I’m sure that Nancy Pelosi would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements! Those progressive congresswomen are Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts.

Some White House officials expect the Cabinet secretary, who has known the president for years, to depart as soon as this summer.
By Hans Nichols, Kayla Tausche, CNBC and Hallie Jackson
WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump has told aides and allies that he is considering removing Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross after a stinging Supreme Court defeat on adding a citizenship question to the census, according to multiple people familiar with the conversations. While Trump has previously expressed frustration with the 81-year-old Ross, in particular over failed trade negotiations, Ross's long personal relationship with the president has allowed him to keep his job. And after the departure of Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, the Cabinet’s only Hispanic who resigned on Friday amid questions about his role in a controversial 2008 plea agreement with sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, Ross may yet receive another reprieve. But some White House officials expect Ross to be the next Cabinet secretary to depart, possibly as soon as this summer, according to advisers and officials. Frustrated by Ross' leadership of the Census Bureau, which is within the Commerce Department, Trump has been making calls to allies outside the White House musing about replacing Ross. The White House declined comment. Ross is one of the original members of a Cabinet that has seen historically high turnover, but his exit would mark the first departure of an agency head that Trump knew well before entering politics. Trump and Ross met — and bonded — through Trump's Atlantic City casino hotel bankruptcies in the 1990s, with Ross representing some of Trump's creditors. For more than 25 years, the two socialized across marriages and states, with both owning nearby residences in Manhattan and Palm Beach. In June of 2016, Ross, a registered Democrat, endorsed Trump for president, saying, "We need a more radical, new approach to government." On election night, Trump promised to recruit only the "best and brightest" to serve in his administration, but he has soured on much of his Cabinet. He called his former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson "dumb as a rock," compared his former Attorney General Jeff Sessions to "Mr. Magoo," and declared that former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis was "not too good" at his job.

By Dean Obeidallah
(CNN) - The headline-grabbing Democratic infighting between Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the high-profile progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC), D-New York, must be bringing joy to President Donald Trump and the GOP. After all, a divided Democratic party would be a great boon to Trump's 2020 reelection bid. And clearly Trump wants to fan the flames of that divide, as we saw with his racist tweets Sunday morning, in which he wrote that he wanted AOC and her closest allies in the House -- Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minnesota, and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Massachusetts, who are black, and Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Michigan, who is the daughter of Palestinian immigrants -- to go back to their own countries, and that he was sure Speaker Pelosi would be "happy" to work out arrangements for their travel. (Pelosi slammed Trump in response for his racist tweets.) But what I witnessed this past week at the annual Netroots convention in Philadelphia tells a far different tale about what's going on with rank-and-file progressives -- and it should deeply worry Trump and his supporters who were hoping for a divided Democratic Party come 2020. Netroots is an annual gathering of progressive activists that began in 2006. As Netroots organizers explained to me, it grew from a few hundred attendees who were primarily white men to this year's convention featuring a record crowd of over 3,600 that was remarkably diverse in terms of age, race, faith, sexual orientation, gender identity, etc. And this year's conference was marked by a singular mantra in approaching the 2020 election that I heard time and time again: "Vote Blue, no matter who." Now, to be clear, that doesn't mean there wasn't a wide range of views by the countless attendees I spoke to regarding which 2020 candidate they were supporting, with many still torn between two or three. But one moment that truly summed up what's going on with the progressive grassroots happened when I spoke to a crowd of a little over 100 people at the convention. I asked them which candidate they were supporting or at least considering. I began by asking about Sen. Elizabeth Warren, which elicited a big cheer. Then Bernie Sanders, and again a sizable number applauded. I went on to measure support (in an unscientific way) for a few of the other top tier candidates, such as Sen. Kamala Harris and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, with all receiving some level of support, but far below that of Warren and Sanders.

Senator Graham said on Sunday that he has no sympathy for the conditions seen in migrant camps over the weekend.
By Kevin Fitzpatrick
Speaking with Sunday Morning Futures host Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business Network, Senator Lindsey Graham vehemently disagreed with humanitarian concerns raised by Vice President Mike Pence’s recent tour of a migrant detention facility in Texas. “I don’t care if they have to stay in these facilities for 400 days, we’re not going to let those men go that I saw,” said Graham. “It would be dangerous.” Graham was referring to now-viral footage of Pence’s tour, which saw the vice president blithely overlooking a fenced room filled to capacity with migrants protesting unsanitary conditions. Pence subsequently claimed over Twitter that the men “were in a temporary holding area because Democrats in Congress have refused to fund additional bed space,” and derided CNN for allegedly “ignoring the excellent care being provided to families and children” in a separate facility. President Donald Trump likewise tweeted on Sunday that “Friday’s tour showed vividly, to politicians and the media, how well run and clean the children’s detention centers are. Great reviews!” Graham, meanwhile, emphasized that the facility was “overwhelmed,” and claimed “all of [the detained migrants] broke our law.” “What I saw is a bunch of people who have been here before, broke the law before, and we’re not going to let them go,” he continued. “I don’t care if they have to stay in these facilities for 400 days, we’re not going to let those men go that I saw. It would be dangerous.”

By Devan Cole, CNN
Washington (CNN) - Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, one of President Donald Trump's strongest allies on Capitol Hill, declined on Monday to condemn the President over his racist tweets against several minority members of Congress, instead calling them a "bunch of communists." Graham's comments, which were later tweeted out by Trump, are the latest example of congressional Republican alignment with Trump in the face of fierce controversy. "Well, we all know that (New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez) and this crowd are a bunch of communists, they hate Israel, they hate our own country," Graham said during an appearance on "Fox and Friends." "They're calling the guards along our border, the border patrol agents, 'concentration camp guards.' They accuse people who support Israel of doing it for the Benjamins. They're anti-Semitic. They're anti-America." Asked by co-host Steve Doocy if he thinks Trump "went too far" with his comments, Graham, who represents South Carolina, said the President should "aim higher" than the personalities of the congresswomen and instead talk about their policies. "You don't need to -- they are American citizens. They won an election. Take on their policies," he said. Graham added that if the group of lawmakers are made "the face of the future" of their party, "You will destroy the Democratic Party." Shortly after Graham made the comments, Trump shared them in a tweet, writing, "Need I say more?" On Sunday, Trump, without naming the lawmakers, implied in a series of tweets that the group of freshman House Democrats that includes Ocasio-Cortez, Reps. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, weren't born in America and sarcastically suggested, "they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came."

By Dan Mangan, Kevin Breuninger
Accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein is willing to post bail as high as $100 million, his lawyer said Monday, as a prosecutor argued that the case against the wealthy investor is “already significantly stronger and getting stronger every single day.” Two accusers of Epstein also urged Judge Richard Berman at a detention hearing in Manhattan federal court to keep him locked up without bail, as prosecutors also are arguing. Berman said he will wait until Thursday morning to decide whether to grant Epstein bail. “Your honor, my name is Courtney Wild and I was sexually abused by Jeffrey Epstein at the age of 14,” one of the accusers told Berman. “He is a scary person to have walking the street.” Wild said that she was abused by Epstein in Palm Beach, Florida. The other accuser, Annie Farmer, told Berman, “I was 16 years old when I had the misfortune of meeting Mr. Epstein here in New York.” “I want to voice my support” that Epstein not get bail, Farmer said. She said that Epstein “was inappropriate with me,” but declined to provide further details in court.


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